18

I'm having trouble with the following code and can't seem to figure out what is wrong

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

double distance(int a, int b)
{
    return fabs(a-b);
}

int main()
{
    vector<int> age;
    age.push_back(10);
    age.push_back(15);

    cout<<distance(age[0],age[1]);
    return 0;
}

The error lies at calling of function distance.

/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h: In instantiation of ‘std::iterator_traits<int>’:
test.cpp:18:30:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:166:53: error: ‘int’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:167:53: error: ‘int’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:168:53: error: ‘int’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:169:53: error: ‘int’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.6/bits/stl_iterator_base_types.h:170:53: error: ‘int’ is not a class, struct, or union type
1
  • I want to store data in a vector array (for dynamic size), then calculate the distance between the data points. – Dzung Nguyen Jan 14 '13 at 16:22
33

You are trying to override std::distance function, try removing "using namespace std" and qualifying cout and endl with std::

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>


double distance(int a, int b)
{
    return fabs(a-b);
}

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> age;
    age.push_back(10);
    age.push_back(15);

    std::cout<< distance(age[0],age[1]);
    return 0;
}

The std::distance is used to count the number of elements in a container within a specified range. You can find more about it here.

Or you can rename your distance function if you want to introduce the std:: namespace:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

double mydistance(int a, int b)
{
    return fabs(a-b);
}

int main()
{
    vector<int> age;
    age.push_back(10);
    age.push_back(15);

    cout<<mydistance(age[0],age[1]);
    return 0;
}

This will make your code work, but it is not recommended to have "using namespace" declarations before definitions. When you write your code, you should avoid the second option, it's shown here only as an alternative for your code example.

4
  • 2
    Or simply rename your own distance function and remove the clash with std::distance. – Mithrandir Jan 14 '13 at 16:24
  • 1
    @Mithrandir That is a quick and cheap fix. I prefer the posters answer. – Caesar Jan 14 '13 at 16:26
  • 6
    @Mithrandir, no, "simply" is "don't bring another namespace into global namespace", because that's why we have them! – Griwes Jan 14 '13 at 16:36
  • 3
    @Mithrandir: namespaces are there to enable you to reuse names. If you fear name-clashes and code around them, you are using namespaces wrong or did not understand them. – Sebastian Mach Jan 14 '13 at 16:40
9

How about

cout<< ::distance(age[0],age[1]);

(other answers already suggest removing the using directive).

1
  • 3
    This is a worthwhile thing to know about the scope resolution operator, but I wouldn't put it in production code unless avoiding it would cause big, big problems. None the less +1 for useful trivia. – dmckee --- ex-moderator kitten Jan 14 '13 at 16:29
4

Don't use using namespace std when you're creating your own function called distance, because your call to distance is looking for std::distance and not your distance function.

You could also do this:

namespace foo
{
  double distance(int a, int b)
  {
    return fabs(a-b);
  }
}

int main()
{
   foo::distance(x,y); //now you're calling your own distance function.
}
1
  • Looks like he has his own distance implementation – CAMOBAP Jan 14 '13 at 16:23
0

Alternatively, you can use

 using foo::distance; // OR:
 using namespace foo;

 (distance)(x,y); // the (parens) prevent ADL

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