28

I need to write a method that will check if Time.now is in between the open hours and the close hours of a shop.

The open and close hours are saved as a Time object but I can't compare it corectly because the shop saved its hours at 2012/2/2 so the open hours will be something like:

2012-02-02 02:30:00 UTC

and Time.now will be:

07:23 +0200

How can I compare just the time part without the date part?

36

You can compare the Time without a date part, for example, as follows:

time1.utc.strftime( "%H%M%S%N" ) <= time2.utc.strftime( "%H%M%S%N" )
  • if open time is 08 AM and close time is 01 AM. does it work ? – Vishal Mar 22 '18 at 8:44
  • @Vishal but how do you wish for the code to work to? – Малъ Скрылевъ Mar 22 '18 at 20:21
  • @МалъСкрылевъ I use postgres as db. i have two fields open_at, close_at , Datatype is time. In my case, store's open time is 8 AM and close time is 1:00 AM, it means store will close tomorrow's 1 AM. so my query fail because ,open_at <= close_at becomes false. can you help me to overcome this issue ? – Vishal Mar 23 '18 at 4:15
  • @Vishal if type of the fields in ruby are strings, you can't compare them is such way, class of the variables in ruby must be only Time or DateTime to the that kind of comparison – Малъ Скрылевъ Mar 23 '18 at 8:06
  • Yes it is Time Class. and it is storing in this format "2000-01-01 08:00:00" – Vishal Mar 23 '18 at 9:44
3

There is a nice library https://github.com/bokmann/business_time which will do this and more for you.

BusinessTime::Config.with(beginning_of_workday: "8:30 am", end_of_workday: "5:30 pm") do
  Time.now.during_business_hours?
end

It will do much more for you, like rolling a time to next or previous opening time, counting business hours between two timestamps, etc.

2

Try converting the Time into a number and strip off the days. Since the Time is represented as a number of seconds since the UNIX Epoch with the decimal being a fraction of the second, you can convert this number to a number of days with the fraction being a fraction of a day.

Day based number = Ruby Time Number / 60 / 60 / 24

You can then use the modulus operator to strip the day portion so all you have left to compare is the time. So you want something like this:

def is_open?(time)
  open_h=Time.parse('2012-02-02 02:30:00 UTC')
  close_h=Time.parse('2012-02-02 10:00:00 UTC')
  (((time.to_r / 60 / 60 / 24) % 1) >= ((open_h.to_r / 60 / 60 / 24) % 1)) && (((time.to_r / 60 / 60 / 24) % 1) <= ((close_h.to_r / 60 / 60 / 24) % 1))
end

is_open? (Time.parse('2013-01-01 09:58:00 UTC'))
=> true
is_open? (Time.parse('2013-01-01 12:58:00 UTC'))
=> false
1

You can strip the Time into its hours, minutes and seconds.

As described in Time Class:

t = Time.now
hour = t.hour
minute = t.min
seconds = t.sec

Since you need to just compare whether it's within 2 hours you can check it as below.

if hour > openingHour and hour < closingHour
  • 2
    How can the OP compare the three values? – the Tin Man Jan 15 '13 at 0:34
  • That doesn't work across the UTC day boundary. – joelparkerhenderson Jan 15 '13 at 2:34
  • Good point. If so then we will have to take t = Time.now.utc – Althaf Hameez Jan 15 '13 at 2:50
  • Yes, and more: imagine a shop in San Francisco that closes at 5 p.m. Pacific, which is 00:00:00 UTC. – joelparkerhenderson Jan 15 '13 at 15:42
1

Instead of trying to compare the point of time directly, you can compare their offsets from a common reference (e.g. midnight). You might need to make sure all times are using the same time zone, depending on your use case.

In Rails, this can be done easily with one of the helpers such as #seconds_since_midnight:

#given
opening_hour = DateTime.new(2012,2,2,2,30,0)

#compare
now = DateTime.now.in_time_zone('UTC')
opening_hour_since_midnight = opening_hour.seconds_since_midnight
now_since_midnight = now.seconds_since_midnight
p 'shop opened' if now_since_midnight > opening_hour_since_midnight
0

You can compare only time in rails without date part like:--- Here post_review is table and we are getting only these record of post_review which are created_at between 10 am ---5pm in any date

post_review.where("(created_at::time >= :start_time) AND (created_at::time <= :end_time)", 
    start_time: Time.parse("10 am").strftime("%r"),
    end_time:   Time.parse("5 pm").strftime("%r")
 )
-1
close_or_open_time_object.to_a.first(3).reverse <=> Time.now.to_a.first(3).reverse
  • 1
    That doesn't work. Try a time across the day boundary to see. – joelparkerhenderson Jan 15 '13 at 2:33
-4

This will work only for time being in 24 hour format and when start hour is less than end hour.

Time start = DateUtil.convertStringToTime(Object.getStartTime());
Time mid = DateUtil.convertStringToTime(time);
Time end = DateUtil.convertStringToTime(Object.getEndTime());

    if(mid.getHours()>start.getHours() && mid.getHours()< end.getHours())
    {
        flag=true;
    }
    else if(mid.getHours() == start.getHours() && mid.getHours() < end.getHours())
    {
        if(mid.getMinutes() > start.getMinutes())
        {               
            flag=true;              
        }
        else if(mid.getMinutes() == start.getMinutes())
        {               
            if(mid.getSeconds() >= start.getSeconds())
            {
                flag=true;
            }
        }
    }
    else if(mid.getHours() > start.getHours() && mid.getHours() == end.getHours())
    {
        if(mid.getMinutes() < end.getMinutes())
        {
            flag=true;
        }
        else if(mid.getMinutes() == end.getMinutes())
        {
            if(mid.getSeconds() <= end.getSeconds())
            {
                flag=true;
            }
        }
    }
    else if(mid.getHours() == start.getHours() && mid.getHours() == end.getHours())
    {
        if(mid.getMinutes() > start.getMinutes() && mid.getMinutes() < end.getMinutes())
        {
            flag=true;
        }           
        else if(mid.getMinutes() == start.getMinutes() && mid.getMinutes() < end.getMinutes())
        {
            if(mid.getSeconds() > start.getSeconds())
            {
                flag=true;
            }
        }
        else if(mid.getMinutes() > start.getMinutes() && mid.getMinutes() == end.getMinutes())
        {
            if(mid.getSeconds() < end.getSeconds())
            {
                flag=true;
            }
        }
        else if(mid.getMinutes() == start.getMinutes() && mid.getMinutes() == end.getMinutes())
        {
            if(mid.getSeconds() > start.getSeconds() && mid.getSeconds() < end.getSeconds())
            {
                flag=true;
            }
        }
    }

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