17

Is it possible to have a switch in a lambda expression? If not, why? Resharper displays it as an error.

5
  • 7
    Does it compile? I wouldn't use Resharper as your final word on valid syntax. – Jeff Yates Sep 16 '09 at 13:26
  • Sure it doesn't and the compiled error is the same as resharper displayed output : A lambda expression with a statement boody cannot be convrted to an expression tree. – Toto Sep 16 '09 at 13:28
  • NB : I don't know what a statement body is. – Toto Sep 16 '09 at 13:29
  • 1
    "I don't know what a statement body is" - that is the difference between a lambda that starts with {/} braces (which always compiles to an anonymous method), and a lambda that doesn't (which can be compiled to an anonymous method or an expression-tree) – Marc Gravell Sep 16 '09 at 13:50
  • @Jeff - of course, the compiler isn't quite the final word either - but it sure is easier than trying to check against the spec ;-p Especially as the specifics of expression-tree translation is notoriously missing from the C# 3.0 / C# 4.0 specs. – Marc Gravell Sep 16 '09 at 14:43
22

You can in a statement block lambda:

Action<int> action = x =>
{
  switch(x)
  {
    case 0: Console.WriteLine("0"); break;
    default: Console.WriteLine("Not 0"); break;
  }
};

But you can't do it in a "single expression lambda", so this is invalid:

// This won't work
Expression<Func<int, int>> action = x =>
  switch(x)
  {
    case 0: return 0;
    default: return x + 1;
  };

This means you can't use switch in an expression tree (at least as generated by the C# compiler; I believe .NET 4.0 at least has support for it in the libraries).

3
  • yes indeed seems the issue is I want an expression tree. Is there any work around better than a if els if o a functino ? – Toto Sep 16 '09 at 13:32
  • A small correction (on hindsight... how much good is hindsight :-) ). The C# 4.0 Compiler still can't build "complex" Expressions (with if, while...) but you can build them through the use of the Expression class. The two things are decoupled. And with less hindsight: the OP asked about expression trees. The second action should have been an Expression<Func<int, int>> to show that you really wanted an Expression Tree and not a delegate. – xanatos Oct 14 '11 at 11:40
  • It's been a while and C# 8 added switch expressions which allow you to Func<int, int> action = x => x switch { 0 => 0, _ => x + 1 }; However, it is still not allowed in an expression tree for some reason Expression<Func<int, int>> action = x => x switch { 0 => 0, _ => x + 1 }; – Robert Taylor Dec 9 '19 at 18:35
12

In a pure Expression (in .NET 3.5), the closest you can get is a compound conditional:

    Expression<Func<int, string>> func = x =>
        x == 1 ? "abc" : (
        x == 2 ? "def" : (
        x == 3 ? "ghi" :
                 "jkl")); /// yes, this is ugly as sin...

Not fun, especially when it gets complex. If you mean a lamda expression with a statement body (only for use with LINQ-to-Objects), then anything is legal inside the braces:

    Func<int, string> func = x => {
        switch (x){
            case 1:  return "abc";
            case 2:  return "def";
            case 3:  return "ghi";
            default: return "jkl";
        }
    };

Of course, you might be able to outsource the work; for example, LINQ-to-SQL allows you to map a scalar UDF (at the database) to a method on the data-context (that isn't actually used) - for example:

var qry = from cust in ctx.Customers
          select new {cust.Name, CustomerType = ctx.MapType(cust.TypeFlag) };

where MapType is a UDF that does the work at the db server.

5
  • 1
    You can omit the parentheses in your first code – the result is much less ugly and I actually use it sometimes. Admittedly, it takes a bit getting used to but it’s not inherently less readable than an equivalent switch block (less so, I’d argue). – Konrad Rudolph Sep 16 '09 at 13:49
  • Without the brackets I sometimes get lost in ? / : etc... but yes, it can work without them ;-p – Marc Gravell Sep 16 '09 at 13:54
  • @MarcGravell Is there still nothing better for a pure Expression in .Net 4.0? – ken2k Apr 23 '13 at 8:20
  • 1
    @ken2k yes and no; the Expression API includes full block support, including Expression.Switch - however, the question here is about lambdas; the C# lambda-to-Expression compiler has not changed to include support for the wider Expression syntax now available. – Marc Gravell Apr 23 '13 at 8:23
  • @MarcGravell Thanks for the information. I'll use the syntax you provided in your first code, it's the most readable indentation I've found yet :) Let's hope the next version of C# language/compiler will provide something better. – ken2k Apr 23 '13 at 8:28
7

Yes, it works, but you have to put your code in a block. Example:

private bool DoSomething(Func<string, bool> callback)
{
    return callback("FOO");
}

Then, to call it:

DoSomething(val =>
                {
                    switch (val)
                    {
                        case "Foo":
                            return true;

                        default:
                            return false;
                    }
                });
2

Hmm, I see no reason why this shouldn't work. Just be careful with the syntax you use

param => {
    // Nearly any code!
}

delegate (param) {
    // Nearly any code!
}

param => JustASingleExpression (No switches)
2

I checked it too :-)

[Test]
public void SwitchInLambda()
{
    TakeALambda(i => {
        switch (i)
        {
            case 2:
                return "Smurf";
            default:
                return "Gnurf";
        }
    });
}

public void TakeALambda(Func<int, string> func)
{
    System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine(func(2));
}

Works just fine (outputs "Smurf")!

1
  • 2
    Because that isn't an Lambda Expression. A Lambda Expression would be of type Expression<Func<int, string>>. That is a Lambda Function. Try changin the input parameter of TakeALambda and see the difference. – xanatos Oct 14 '11 at 11:32
0

enter image description here

I just learn this:

                      (model) =>
                                {
                                    switch(model.SentInvoiceTypeId)
                                    {
                                        case 1:
                                            return "1 asdf";
                                        case 2:
                                            return "2 asdf";
                                        case 3:
                                            return "3 asdf ";
                                        case 4:
                                            return "4 asdf ";
                                        default:
                                            return "asdf";
                                    }
                                }

Just put between the "model" () and add your code in { }, remember to have a return.
I am not sure in which versions of C# will work, In this example is the C# 7.0

I hope this answer can help someone.

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