79

I have a script that outputs 'hi', sleeps for a second, outputs 'hi', sleeps for 1 second, and so on and so forth. Now I thought I would be able to tackle this problem with this model.

var spawn = require('child_process').spawn,
temp    = spawn('PATH TO SCRIPT WITH THE ABOVE BEHAVIOUR');

temp.stdout.pipe(process.stdout);

Now the problem is that the task needs to be finished in order for the output to be displayed. As I am understanding it, this is due to the fact that the newly spawned process takes execution control. Obviously node.js does not support threads so any solutions? My idea was to possibly run two instances, first one for the specific purpose of creating the task and have it pipe the output to process of the second instance, considering this can be achieved.

71

I'm still getting my feet wet with Node.js, but I have a few ideas. first, I believe you need to use execFile instead of spawn; execFile is for when you have the path to a script, whereas spawn is for executing a well-known command that Node.js can resolve against your system path.

1. Provide a callback to process the buffered output:

var child = require('child_process').execFile('path/to/script', [ 
    'arg1', 'arg2', 'arg3', 
], function(err, stdout, stderr) { 
    // Node.js will invoke this callback when process terminates.
    console.log(stdout); 
});  

2. Add a listener to the child process' stdout stream (9thport.net)

var child = require('child_process').execFile('path/to/script', [ 
    'arg1', 'arg2', 'arg3' ]); 
// use event hooks to provide a callback to execute when data are available: 
child.stdout.on('data', function(data) {
    console.log(data.toString()); 
});

Further, there appear to be options whereby you can detach the spawned process from Node's controlling terminal, which would allow it to run asynchronously. I haven't tested this yet, but there are examples in the API docs that go something like this:

child = require('child_process').execFile('path/to/script', [ 
    'arg1', 'arg2', 'arg3', 
], { 
    // detachment and ignored stdin are the key here: 
    detached: true, 
    stdio: [ 'ignore', 1, 2 ]
}); 
// and unref() somehow disentangles the child's event loop from the parent's: 
child.unref(); 
child.stdout.on('data', function(data) {
    console.log(data.toString()); 
});
  • 7
    Bonus points if you can explain how to do this with exec() as I need to execute a shell cmd. – DynamicDan Apr 10 '14 at 19:35
  • 2
    You can use child.spawn() with the shell option set to true. nodejs.org/api/… – CedX Jun 2 '16 at 14:35
  • 4
    You can also pipe child.stdout directly to process.stdout with child.stdout.pipe(process.stdout); – darkadept Oct 19 '16 at 20:43
  • @DynamicDan javascript let childProcess = exec ( './script-to-run --arg1 arg1value', ( error, stdout, stderror ) => { console.log( '[CALLBACK]: ' + error ); // or stdout or stderror } ); // Same as with spawn: childProcess.stdout.on ( 'data', ( data ) => { console.log( '[LIVE]: ' + data ); // Here's your live data! } ); – Rik Jun 8 '18 at 14:05
93

It's much easier now (6 years later)!

Spawn returns a childObject, which you can then listen for events with. The events are:

  • Class: ChildProcess
    • Event: 'error'
    • Event: 'exit'
    • Event: 'close'
    • Event: 'disconnect'
    • Event: 'message'

There are also a bunch of objects from childObject, they are:

  • Class: ChildProcess
    • child.stdin
    • child.stdout
    • child.stderr
    • child.stdio
    • child.pid
    • child.connected
    • child.kill([signal])
    • child.send(message[, sendHandle][, callback])
    • child.disconnect()

See more information here about childObject: https://nodejs.org/api/child_process.html

Asynchronous

If you want to run your process in the background while node is still able to continue to execute, use the asynchronous method. You can still choose to perform actions after your process completes, and when the process has any output (for example if you want to send a script's output to the client).

child_process.spawn(...); (Node v0.1.90)

var spawn = require('child_process').spawn;
var child = spawn('node ./commands/server.js');

// You can also use a variable to save the output 
// for when the script closes later
var scriptOutput = "";

child.stdout.setEncoding('utf8');
child.stdout.on('data', function(data) {
    //Here is where the output goes

    console.log('stdout: ' + data);

    data=data.toString();
    scriptOutput+=data;
});

child.stderr.setEncoding('utf8');
child.stderr.on('data', function(data) {
    //Here is where the error output goes

    console.log('stderr: ' + data);

    data=data.toString();
    scriptOutput+=data;
});

child.on('close', function(code) {
    //Here you can get the exit code of the script

    console.log('closing code: ' + code);

    console.log('Full output of script: ',scriptOutput);
});

Here's how you would use a callback + asynchronous method:

var child_process = require('child_process');

console.log("Node Version: ", process.version);

run_script("ls", ["-l", "/home"], function(output, exit_code) {
    console.log("Process Finished.");
    console.log('closing code: ' + exit_code);
    console.log('Full output of script: ',output);
});

console.log ("Continuing to do node things while the process runs at the same time...");

// This function will output the lines from the script 
// AS is runs, AND will return the full combined output
// as well as exit code when it's done (using the callback).
function run_script(command, args, callback) {
    console.log("Starting Process.");
    var child = child_process.spawn(command, args);

    var scriptOutput = "";

    child.stdout.setEncoding('utf8');
    child.stdout.on('data', function(data) {
        console.log('stdout: ' + data);

        data=data.toString();
        scriptOutput+=data;
    });

    child.stderr.setEncoding('utf8');
    child.stderr.on('data', function(data) {
        console.log('stderr: ' + data);

        data=data.toString();
        scriptOutput+=data;
    });

    child.on('close', function(code) {
        callback(scriptOutput,code);
    });
}

Using the method above, you can send every line of output from the script to the client (for example using Socket.io to send each line when you receive events on stdout or stderr).

Synchronous

If you want node to stop what it's doing and wait until the script completes, you can use the synchronous version:

child_process.spawnSync(...); (Node v0.11.12+)

Issues with this method:

  • If the script takes a while to complete, your server will hang for that amount of time!
  • The stdout will only be returned once the script has finished running. Because it's synchronous, it cannot continue until the current line has finished. Therefore it's unable to capture the 'stdout' event until the spawn line has finished.

How to use it:

var child_process = require('child_process');

var child = child_process.spawnSync("ls", ["-l", "/home"], { encoding : 'utf8' });
console.log("Process finished.");
if(child.error) {
    console.log("ERROR: ",child.error);
}
console.log("stdout: ",child.stdout);
console.log("stderr: ",child.stderr);
console.log("exist code: ",child.status);
  • 9
    +1, this should be chosen as the right answer now. Just a note, the data variable in the callback comes in as Buffer object. You can use child.stdout.setEncoding('utf8') if you want utf8 strings coming in. – Ashish Feb 17 '16 at 16:54
  • 2
    This doesn't work if you need the information from stdout asynchronously, that is, while the remaining program continues, if the process continues. – Christian Hujer Nov 18 '18 at 15:45
  • 1
    Hey @ChristianHujer ! I updated my answer to include both async and sync :D – Katie Aug 9 at 18:00
19

Here is the cleanest approach i've found:

require("child_process").spawn('bash', ['./script.sh'], {
  cwd: process.cwd(),
  detached: true,
  stdio: "inherit"
});
13

I had a little trouble getting logging output from the "npm install" command when I spawned npm in a child process. The realtime logging of dependencies did not show in the parent console.

The simplest way to do what the original poster wants seems to be this (spawn npm on windows and log everything to parent console):

var args = ['install'];

var options = {
    stdio: 'inherit' //feed all child process logging into parent process
};

var childProcess = spawn('npm.cmd', args, options);
childProcess.on('close', function(code) {
    process.stdout.write('"npm install" finished with code ' + code + '\n');
});
1

child:

setInterval(function() {
    process.stdout.write("hi");
}, 1000); // or however else you want to run a timer

parent:

require('child_process').fork('./childfile.js');
// fork'd children use the parent's stdio
1

I found myself requiring this functionality often enough that I packaged it into a library called std-pour. It should let you execute a command and view the output in real time. To install simply:

npm install std-pour

Then it's simple enough to execute a command and see the output in realtime:

const { pour } = require('std-pour');
pour('ping', ['8.8.8.8', '-c', '4']).then(code => console.log(`Error Code: ${code}`));

It's promised based so you can chain multiple commands. It's even function signature-compatible with child_process.spawn so it should be a drop in replacement anywhere you're using it.

0

Adding an answer related to child_process.exec as I too had needed live feedback and wasn't getting any until after the script finished. This also supplements my comment to the accepted answer, but as it's formatted it will a bit more understandable and easier to read.

Basically, I have a npm script that calls Gulp, invoking a task which subsequently uses child_process.exec to execute a bash or batch script depending on the OS. Either script runs a build process via Gulp and then makes some calls to some binaries that work with the Gulp output.

It's exactly like the others (spawn, etc.), but for the sake of completion, here's exactly how to do it:

// INCLUDES
import * as childProcess from 'child_process'; // ES6 Syntax


// GLOBALS
let exec = childProcess.exec; // Or use 'var' for more proper 
                              // semantics, though 'let' is 
                              // true-to-scope


// Assign exec to a variable, or chain stdout at the end of the call
// to exec - the choice, yours (i.e. exec( ... ).stdout.on( ... ); )
let childProcess = exec
(
    './binary command -- --argument argumentValue',
    ( error, stdout, stderr ) =>
    {
        if( error )
        {
            // This won't show up until the process completes:
            console.log( '[ERROR]: "' + error.name + '" - ' + error.message );
            console.log( '[STACK]: ' + error.stack );

            console.log( stdout );
            console.log( stderr );
            callback();            // Gulp stuff
            return;
        }

        // Neither will this:
        console.log( stdout );
        console.log( stderr );
        callback();                // Gulp stuff
    }
);

Now its as simple as adding an event listener. For stdout:

childProcess.stdout.on
(
    'data',
    ( data ) =>
    {
        // This will render 'live':
        console.log( '[STDOUT]: ' + data );
    }
);

And for stderr:

childProcess.stderr.on
(
    'data',
    ( data ) =>
    {
        // This will render 'live' too:
        console.log( '[STDERR]: ' + data );
    }
);

Not too bad at all - HTH

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