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is there any method to compute a one way hash in C programming, which returns the array of bytes for the resulting hash value.. Thanks..

  • 1
    Any specific kind of hash? – Kos Jan 15 '13 at 9:11
  • 1
    Yes. Is there a specific one you're interested in? – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 15 '13 at 9:11
  • Is there "built-in" function? No. But nothing will stop you from writing one. – SBI Jan 15 '13 at 9:11
  • Boost has everything you need to handle SHA1. – SBI Jan 15 '13 at 9:15
  • 1
    Yeah, and this question is tagged in both C++ and C ;) – SBI Jan 15 '13 at 9:25
6

You could use a Lib for that. For example libgcrypt.

Take a look here. That is almost the same question that you askt here.

For the libgcrypt11-dev package (gcrypt.h)

#include <gcrypt.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(int argc, char **argv){

  /* Test for arg string */
  if ( argc < 2 ){
    fprintf( stderr, "Usage: %s <string>\n", argv[0] );
    exit( 1 );
  }

  /* Length of message to encrypt */
  int msg_len = strlen( argv[1] );

  /* Length of resulting sha1 hash - gcry_md_get_algo_dlen
   * returns digest lenght for an algo */
  int hash_len = gcry_md_get_algo_dlen( GCRY_MD_SHA1 );

  /* output sha1 hash - this will be binary data */
  unsigned char hash[ hash_len ];

  /* output sha1 hash - converted to hex representation
   * 2 hex digits for every byte + 1 for trailing \0 */
  char *out = (char *) malloc( sizeof(char) * ((hash_len*2)+1) );
  char *p = out;

  /* calculate the SHA1 digest. This is a bit of a shortcut function
   * most gcrypt operations require the creation of a handle, etc. */
  gcry_md_hash_buffer( GCRY_MD_SHA1, hash, argv[1], msg_len );

  /* Convert each byte to its 2 digit ascii
   * hex representation and place in out */
  int i;
  for ( i = 0; i < hash_len; i++, p += 2 ) {
    snprintf ( p, 3, "%02x", hash[i] );
  }

  printf( "%s\n", out );
  free( out );

}

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