25

This is annoying:

class MyClass:
    @staticmethod
    def foo():
        print "hi"

    @staticmethod
    def bar():
        MyClass.foo()

Is there a way to make this work without naming MyClass in the call? i.e. so I can just say foo() on the last line?

2
  • Nope. What are you trying to achive? – Martijn Pieters Jan 15 '13 at 15:12
  • 1
    A class method takes the class as the first parameter because it uses the class. bar should be a @classmethod. – Katriel Jan 15 '13 at 15:44
18

There is no way to use foo and get what you want. There is no implicit class scope, so foo is either a local or a global, neither of which you want.

You might find classmethods more useful:

class MyClass:
    @classmethod
    def foo(cls):
        print "hi"

    @classmethod
    def bar(cls):
        cls.foo()

This way, at least you don't have to repeat the name of the class.

1
  • 9
    Why make foo a classmethod when you're not using the class? I'd make foo a staticmethod and bar a classmethod (as you've done). – mgilson Jan 15 '13 at 15:20
1

Not possible. It is a question of language design. Compare that to C++, where both this (the same as Python self; in Python you have to write self.var, in C++ you may write just var, not this->var) and own class are used by default in member functions, and you will probably see that sometimes that's good and sometimes that's annoying. The only thing possible is to get used to that feature.

0

You 'variable-ize' the class name. This will not remove, but shorten the name.

class MyClass:
    @staticmethod
    def foo():
        print "hi"

    @staticmethod
    def bar():
        c.foo()

c = MyClass
-1

You can do something hacky by making a module level function foo and then adding it to the class namespace with staticmethod:

def foo():
    print "hi"

class MyClass(object):
    foo = staticmethod(foo)

    @classmethod
    def bar(cls):
        return cls.foo()

    def baz(self):
        return foo()


c = MyClass()
c.bar()
c.baz()

MyClass.bar()
MyClass.foo()

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