8

I need to greet a user (using “Good morning”, “Good afternoon”, or “Good evening”) depending on the time of day.

I have already gained the users details ($userTitle $userName) however I am not sure how to greet someone differently depending on the time... any ideas?

  • You can get the current time and get the hour field in that. Get it in 24HR format. Then 0-12 morning, 12-16 afternoon, 16-24 evening. – Satish Jan 15 '13 at 20:34
17
h=`date +%H`

if [ $h -lt 12 ]; then
  echo Good morning
elif [ $h -lt 18 ]; then
  echo Good afternoon
else
  echo Good evening
fi
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you, brilliant answer and it works perfectly, you have saved me a lot of problems :) – J Homard Jan 15 '13 at 20:50
5

You could get the time like this:

TIME=$(date "+%H")

Then act on that value i.e

if [ $TIME -lt 12 ]; then
    echo "Good morning"
elif [ $TIME -lt 18 ]]; then
    echo "Good afternoon"
else
    echo "Good evening"
fi
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you, much appreciated – J Homard Jan 15 '13 at 20:50
2

Try doing this :

TIME=$(date "+%k")

if ((TIME < 12 )); then
    echo "Good morning"
elif ((TIME < 18 )); then
    echo "Good afternoon"
else
    echo "Good evening"
fi

NOTE

  • with this syntax, no need to remember -ge and such. This is just like arithmetic
  • ((...)) is an arithmetic command, which returns an exit status of 0 if the expression is nonzero, or 1 if the expression is zero. Also used as a synonym for let, if side effects (assignments) are needed. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/ArithmeticExpression
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Problems with octal interpretation for 8 and 9 am, use (( 10#$TIME < 12 )) or date +%k – glenn jackman Jan 15 '13 at 21:35
1
hour=`date +%H`
if [ $hour -le 12 ]; then
    echo 'good morning'
elif [ $hour -ge 18 ]; then
    echo 'good evening'
else
    echo 'good afternoon'
fi
| improve this answer | |
1

All other answers is correct except one detail. Command date +%H return number hours in format XX ( for example if time is 09:00:00, then it return "09" ). In bash numbers started with zero is octal numbers. So this nuance can cause errors.

For example:

if [ 09 > 10 ] 
then
    echo "it's something strange here"
fi

will print "it's something strange here".

Probably you chose time intervals, who are not cause such behavior. But for insurance you can write:

hours=date +"%H" | sed -e 's/^0//g'

Be carefull.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    ways to avoid octal problem: 1) use string comparison -lt/-gt; 2) force base 10 10#$hours; 3) use date +%k – glenn jackman Jan 15 '13 at 21:38
0

Whatif in powershell with a function ?

function Get-Greeting
    {
    $Hour = (Get-Date).TimeOfDay.Hours
    if($Hour –ge 0 –and $Hour –lt 12)

    {
        $greet = “Good Morning give me a coffee !!”
    }
    elseif($Hour –ge 12 –and $Hour –lt 16)
    {
        $greet = “Good Afternoon How is the weather today?”
    }
    else
    {
        $greet = “Good Evening sir, want to sip a tea?”
    }

    $Username = $env:USERNAME

    return $(“$greet , You have logged in as User, $Username” )
    }
        enter code here
| improve this answer | |
-1
echo enter the time 
read time 
if [ $ time - lt 12 ]
then
echo good morning
elif [ $ time - lt 16 ]
then
echo good afternoon
elif [ $ time - lt 20 ]
then
echo good evening
elif [ $ time - lt 25]
then
echo good night
else
echo enter a valid number only 24 hour!!!!!!!
fi
| improve this answer | |
-2
h=`date|cut -d" " -f4|cut -d: -f1`
if [ $h -lt 10 ]; then
 echo Good Morning
elif [ $h -gt 10 -o $h -lt 16 ]; then
 echo Good Afternoon
elif [ $h -gt 16 -o $h -lt 20 ]; then
 echo Good Evening
else
 echo Good Night
fi
| improve this answer | |

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