28
class TestSpeedRetrieval(webapp.RequestHandler):
  """
  Test retrieval times of various important records in the BigTable database 
  """
  def get(self):
      commandValidated = True 
      beginTime = time()
      itemList = Subscriber.all().fetch(1000) 

      for item in itemList: 
          pass 
      endTime = time()
      self.response.out.write("<br/>Subscribers count=" + str(len(itemList)) + 
           " Duration=" + duration(beginTime,endTime)) 

How can I turn the above into a function where I pass the name of the class? In the above example, Subscriber (in the Subscriber.all().fetch statement) is a class name, which is how you define data tables in Google BigTable with Python.

I want to do something like this:

       TestRetrievalOfClass(Subscriber)  
or     TestRetrievalOfClass("Subscriber")  

Thanks, Neal Walters

27
class TestSpeedRetrieval(webapp.RequestHandler):
  """
  Test retrieval times of various important records in the BigTable database 
  """
  def __init__(self, cls):
      self.cls = cls

  def get(self):
      commandValidated = True 
      beginTime = time()
      itemList = self.cls.all().fetch(1000) 

      for item in itemList: 
          pass 
      endTime = time()
      self.response.out.write("<br/>%s count=%d Duration=%s" % (self.cls.__name__, len(itemList), duration(beginTime,endTime))

TestRetrievalOfClass(Subscriber)  
  • Cool, I didn't know you could pass a class just like any other variable. I was missing that connection. – NealWalters Sep 17 '09 at 3:37
  • 9
    functions, methods, class, modules everything is a first class object in python which you can pass around – Anonymous Sep 17 '09 at 5:31
12

If you pass the class object directly, as in your code between "like this" and "or", you can get its name as the __name__ attribute.

Starting with the name (as in your code after "or") makes it REALLY hard (and not unambiguous) to retrieve the class object unless you have some indication about where the class object may be contained -- so why not pass the class object instead?!

  • 1
    +1: Classes are first-class objects -- you can assign them to variables and parameters and everything. This isn't C++. – S.Lott Sep 17 '09 at 12:05
  • OBJ = globals()[className]() where className is the variable containing the string of the name of the class. Got this from an old post here: python-forum.org/pythonforum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=13106 – NealWalters Sep 17 '09 at 18:44
  • 2
    @NealWalters, that won't work if the class is defined anywhere ELSE than at top-level in the current module (in a function, in another class, in another module, and so forth), so not a good idea in general. – Alex Martelli Sep 18 '09 at 3:46
  • @Ned Batchelder, @Alex Martelli, what would be most appropriate type-annotation (Python 3.6+) for a class-name argument? @Mikhail Gerasimov says I could use Callable but that sounds misleading – y2k-shubham Jan 31 at 7:10
2

A slight variation of Ned's code that I used. This is a web application, so I start it by running the get routine via a URL: http://localhost:8080/TestSpeedRetrieval. I didn't see the need of the init.

class TestSpeedRetrieval(webapp.RequestHandler):
  """
  Test retrieval times of various important records in the BigTable database 
  """
  def speedTestForRecordType(self, recordTypeClassname):
      beginTime = time()
      itemList = recordTypeClassname.all().fetch(1000) 
      for item in itemList: 
          pass # just because we almost always loop through the records to put them somewhere 
      endTime = time() 
      self.response.out.write("<br/>%s count=%d Duration=%s" % 
         (recordTypeClassname.__name__, len(itemList), duration(beginTime,endTime)))

  def get(self):

      self.speedTestForRecordType(Subscriber) 
      self.speedTestForRecordType(_AppEngineUtilities_SessionData) 
      self.speedTestForRecordType(CustomLog) 

Output:

Subscriber count=11 Duration=0:2
_AppEngineUtilities_SessionData count=14 Duration=0:1  
CustomLog count=5 Duration=0:2

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.