6

And no, this does not (to my understanding) involve integer division or floating-point rounding issues.

My exact code is:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        double power = (double)1.0 / (double)7.0;
        double expBase = -128.0;
        System.Console.WriteLine("sanity check: expected: -128 ^ 0.142857142857143 = -2.    actual: " + expBase + " ^ " + power + " = " + Math.Pow(expBase, power));
        System.Console.ReadLine();
    }

The output is:

sanity check: expected: -128 ^ 0.142857142857143 = -2. actual: -128 ^ 0.14285 7142857143 = NaN

The Target Framework for this code is (according to solution properties) .NET Framework 4.0 Client Profile.

Strangely I haven't found any mention of this anywhere on the Web. Am I taking crazy pills here!?

7
  • 2
    I don't think the answer to this is what you expect: wolframalpha.com/input/?i=%28-128%29%5E%281%2F7%29 Jan 16, 2013 at 20:44
  • No, the problem is one of precedence. The statement -128 ^ (1/7) could be interpreted as -(128^(1/7)) or as (-128)^(1/7). In this case, the latter is what is in use. Jan 16, 2013 at 20:48
  • This is not about precedence. (-128)^(1/7) is -2, but 0.14285 7142857143 != 1/7.
    – JLRishe
    Jan 16, 2013 at 20:57
  • 2
    @JLRishe: This is neither about precedence nor about rounding. See my answer for the mathematical reasons. Jan 16, 2013 at 21:10
  • 1
    Think about this in terms of mathematical definitions. What you're trying to find is the 7th root of -128. However, this is exactly equivalent to the negated 7th root of 128. Using a positive radicand is guaranteed to give a valid value for all 'standard' roots. Instead of trying to find a different math library, just restructure the problem to make it work with your code: in this case, -Math.Pow(-expBase, power). Do note that this only works in this case because your radix is 7, an odd number. An even-radix root would produce a complex number, which has no standard form in C#, AFAIK. Jan 30, 2013 at 18:16

6 Answers 6

18

Seems to be exactly as specified; from the Math.Pow() remarks section on Pow(x,y);

Parameters
x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is not an integer, NegativeInfinity, or PositiveInfinity.

Result
NaN

0
12

Joachim's answer explains that pow is behaving according to its specification.

Why is pow( ) specified that way? Because 1.0/7.0 is not equal to 1/7. You are asking for the 0.14285714285714285 power of -128.0, and there is no real number with that property, so the result is correctly NaN. For all odd n != 1, 1.0/(double)n is not exactly representable, so you can't compute the nth root of x by using pow(x, 1.0/(double)n). Therefore pow(x, y) is specified to return NaN for negative x and non-integer y -- there is no appropriate real result for any of those cases.

13
  • It should return the representable value closest to (-128)**(.1428…). :-) Jan 16, 2013 at 21:11
  • @EricPostpischil: Somehow I doubt the questioner expects the answer 1.8019377358048383; it's really not very close at all. Jan 16, 2013 at 21:15
  • 2
    But think how much it would add to the questions on Stack Overflow. Instead of explaining how .1+.2 gives .30…01 due to correctly rounded arithmetic, we could explain how 1.8019… is the correctly rounded result of pow(-128, 1/7.). Jan 16, 2013 at 21:45
  • I guess I fail to understand how it has anything to do with 1/7 not being exactly representable, when 1/7 is still not representable if you use a positive base i.e. double power = (double)1.0 / (double)7.0;' 'double expBase = 128.0; results in exactly 2.0
    – cowlinator
    Jan 16, 2013 at 22:06
  • 1
    @supercat: IEEE-754 recommended that languages provide the rootn function for this purpose in 2008; it will take a few years to find its way into C, and a few years after that to find its way into most other languages. May 7, 2014 at 23:32
3

The problem here is the mathematical definition of "seventh root" is a multivalued function. While it is true that

(-2)7 = -128

this does not mean that -2 is the only answer to (-128)1/7. In the complex plane, the seventh-root function is multivalued and has many possible answers (just as the square root of 4 can be considered to be either +2 or -2, but +2 is the usual answer).

In order to simplify the mathematical handling of such expressions, the principal value is chosen by convention for the function in question so that the function becomes single-valued. In the case of seventh-root, the principal value is that given by Wolfram Alpha for (-128)1/7.

The Math.Pow() function in C# attempts to return the principal value for the pow function. When the principal value of the result would be a complex number, it returns NaN.

9
  • That is not the problem. sqrt is in generally multivalued, but we define sqrt to return the positive root. pow could be similarly defined. The problem in this specific case is that pow is not being passed 1/7 for the power. It is being passed a double that is near 1/7, and it has no way to know that 1/7 was intended. Jan 16, 2013 at 21:14
  • @EricPostpischil: There is no reason, even with exact calculations, why (-128)^(1/7) should return -2. That answer would be on a branch that wouldn't be considered a principal branch. Wolfram Alpha agrees and shows a result that is nowhere near -2. Jan 16, 2013 at 21:23
  • @EricPostpischil Not a difference in principle, 1.0/7.0 is still a rational number, so the power is a finitely branched covering of the plane. Jan 16, 2013 at 21:24
  • None of which get the intended answer. I.e., the problem here is not that the function is multivalued. The problem is that information has been lost before pow has been called. There is no definition of a function that gives the correct answer given incorrect inputs (in general). Jan 16, 2013 at 21:39
  • Math.Sqrt() and Math.Pow() often should have multiple values, but only return one. I figured that the solution was chosen on what was a simple, real number. The standard windows calculator seems to be able to choose a human-readable solution to -128^(1/7)... I'm surprised Math.Pow() does not.
    – cowlinator
    Jan 16, 2013 at 22:26
1

A fractional power of a negative real number is a complex number (see Math Forum for a detailed explanation).

2
  • Not always. Given an odd whole number y and a real number x, x^(1/y) will always be real, even if x is negative.
    – JLRishe
    Jan 16, 2013 at 21:05
  • @JLRishe Not if you interpret a power function \z -> z^e as an analytic function. The analytic continuations of that from the positive half-line take nonreal values on the negative half-line for e = 1/y, y > 1 integer. Jan 16, 2013 at 21:20
0

I fixed Math.Pow().

It now has a larger accepted domain (i.e. for Parameters: x < 0 but not NegativeInfinity; y is a fraction with a numerator of 1 and an odd denominator), and returns a real number result for the new domain area.

In other words, (-128)^(1/7) returns -2.

Note: due to double-float precision limitations, it will work for most, but not all, fractional exponents.

Below is the code for the wrapper for Math.Pow() I wrote.

public class MathUtil
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Wrapper for Math.Pow()
    /// Can handle cases like (-8)^(1/3) or  (-1/64)^(1/3)
    /// </summary>
    public static double Pow(double expBase, double power)
    {
        bool sign = (expBase < 0);
        if (sign && HasEvenDenominator(power)) 
            return double.NaN;  //sqrt(-1) = i
        else
        {
            if (sign && HasOddDenominator(power))
                return -1 * Math.Pow(Math.Abs(expBase), power);
            else
                return Math.Pow(expBase, power);
        }
    }

    private static bool HasEvenDenominator(double input)
    {
        if(input == 0)
            return false;
        else if (input % 1 == 0)
            return false;

        double inverse = 1 / input;
        if (inverse % 2 < double.Epsilon)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }

    private static bool HasOddDenominator(double input)
    {
        if (input == 0)
            return false;
        else if (input % 1 == 0)
            return false;

        double inverse = 1 / input;
        if ((inverse + 1) % 2 < double.Epsilon)
            return true;
        else
            return false;
    }
}
3
  • 1
    Why do you use HasOddDenominator. Cant you just say: !HasEvenDenominator ? Oct 7, 2013 at 11:55
  • Thx,but the code cant be use x=-10; x ^ (2/3) and the result is positive.
    – lindexi
    Apr 21, 2017 at 10:11
  • (-10)^(2/3) is a multivalued function, and one of the results is positive (in RL). So what is the problem?
    – cowlinator
    Oct 18, 2017 at 20:23
0

For 1.0/3 != 1/3 ,I use Rational that can Accurately represent 1/3 in Microsoft.SolverFoundation.Common .See:https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.solverfoundation.common.rational%28v=vs.93%29.aspx?f=255&MSPPError=-2147217396

And I can catch the odd root link 1/3 for I can get the Denominator.

If I get a root is ax that I use the code get the Numerator and Denominator.

            var at = (double)ax.Numerator;
            var down = (double)ax.Denominator;

Rational can make the 2/6=1/3.

But the Rational.Pow cant calculate powerBase isnt positive.

I find the powerBase isnt positive and the Denominator is even and Numerator is odd.

             if (at % 2 == 1 && down % 2 == 0)
            {
                return Double.NaN;
            }

If the Denominator is odd ,I use x = x * -1

            if (at % 2 == 1 && down % 2 == 1)
            {
                x = Math.Pow(x, (int)at);
                x = x * -1;
                return -1 * Math.Pow(x, 1.0 / (int)down);
            }

If the Numerator is even ,the pow of Numerator make powerBase is positive.

Like pow(x,2/3), if x isnt positive ,it will be positive when use pow(x,2)

            x = Math.Pow(x, (int)at);
            return Math.Pow(x, 1.0 / (int)down);

The code you can use

       if (x < 0)
        {                
            var at = (double)ax.Numerator;
            var down = (double)ax.Denominator;

            if (at % 2 == 1 && down % 2 == 0)
            {
                return Double.NaN;
            }
            if (at % 2 == 1 && down % 2 == 1)
            {
                x = Math.Pow(x, (int)at);
                x = x * -1;
                return -1 * Math.Pow(x, 1.0 / (int)down);
            }
            x = Math.Pow(x, (int)at);
            return Math.Pow(x, 1.0 / (int)down);
        }
        else
        {
            return Math.Pow(x, a);
        }

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.