9

I'm creating a canvas via javascript on a webproject.

The canvas has graphical representations on the x-y plane.

I am trying to add the horizontal-scrolling feature to the canvas.

I have investigated a few methodologies:-

1) draw 12 months worth of data on the canvas, when the mouse scrolls forward, 1st month's data disappears, and at the end a new months data is added, new canvas is drawn.

Con:- Everytime the mouse scrolls to pan thru the timeline - a new SQL query has to be made, making my web application very slow.

2) maybe I can draw say 10 years worth of data on the canvas via 1 SQL query, but only show 12 months worth of the data. masking the rest of the 9 years. Now when the client scrolls, I capture the scroll event and move to the appropriate part of the canvas. Is this possible? If so then how?

Can anyone advise?

My current representation of the canvas = with only 12 months worth of data

My current representation of the canvas = with only 12 months worth of data

To be more specific on the scrolling, I would like to have a feeling such as the following widget for my client-side scrolling action:-

http://www.simile-widgets.org/timeline/

  • 1
    SVG is generally considered a more appropriate tool for data plotting, just saying. – Shmiddty Jan 16 '13 at 22:43
  • But what you want to do is use context.translate(-x, 0) to simulate the effect. This way, you won't have to change the x-coordinates of your data points. – Shmiddty Jan 16 '13 at 22:46
12

Here's a pretty basic implementation: http://jsfiddle.net/CQPeU/

var can = document.getElementById("can"),
    ctx = can.getContext('2d'),
    dragging = false,
    lastX = 0,
    translated = 0;

// these two lines will make the y-axis grow upwards. 
ctx.scale(1,-1);  
ctx.translate(0, -400);

can.onmousedown = function(e){
  var evt = e || event;
  dragging = true;
  lastX = evt.offsetX;
}

window.onmousemove = function(e){
  var evt = e || event;
  if (dragging){
    var delta = evt.offsetX - lastX;
    translated += delta;
    ctx.translate(delta, 0);  // translate the context.
    lastX = evt.offsetX;
    draw();  // redraw
  }
}

window.onmouseup = function(){
  dragging = false;
}


function draw() {
  ctx.clearRect(-translated, 0, 600, 400); // this is why we need to keep track of how much we've translated
  for (var i = 0; i < plot.length; i++) {
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(plot[i].x, plot[i].y, 5, 0, 2 * Math.PI); // note we don't have to futz with the x/y values, and can use them directly. 
    ctx.fill();
  }
}

To create a grid, you could do something like this:

var grid = (function(dX, dY){
  var can = document.createElement("canvas"),
      ctx = can.getContext('2d');
  can.width = dX;
  can.height = dY;
  // fill canvas color
  ctx.fillStyle = 'black';
  ctx.fillRect(0, 0, dX, dY);

  // x axis
  ctx.strokeStyle = 'orange';
  ctx.moveTo(.5, 0.5);
  ctx.lineTo(dX + .5, 0.5);
  ctx.stroke();

  // y axis
  ctx.moveTo(.5, .5);
  ctx.lineTo(.5, dY + .5);
  ctx.stroke();

  return ctx.createPattern(can, 'repeat');
})(100, 50);

Which would be used like this:

function draw() {
  ctx.clearRect(-translated, 0, 600, 400);
  ctx.rect(-translated, 0, 600, 400);
  ctx.fillStyle = grid;
  ctx.fill();
  ctx.fillStyle = "#fff";
  for (var i = 0; i < plot.length; i++) {
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(plot[i].x, plot[i].y, 5, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
    ctx.fill();
  }
}

Updated demo: http://jsfiddle.net/CQPeU/2/

  • alright finally!! – Philo Jan 17 '13 at 0:23
  • with this approach, a new problem comes to light - static labels on the y axis. such as:- jsfiddle.net/WNpKE/10 – Philo Jan 21 '13 at 20:24
  • 1
    Or, perhaps, a simpler method would be to set their x-coordinate to -translated as seen here: jsfiddle.net/WNpKE/11 – Shmiddty Jan 21 '13 at 20:34
  • 1
    This is close: jsfiddle.net/WNpKE/12 – Shmiddty Jan 21 '13 at 21:38
  • 1
    my god!! A daniel has come to judgement. this will set me off in the right direction. so many thanks to you dude! if you were around, I would buy you lunch, dinner and beer. – Philo Jan 21 '13 at 21:44
3

To avoid the redraw on every Mouse Move event in the answer from @Shmiddty, you can draw the entire canvas oversize, then change the CSS margin property. This is a significant performance gain when the content of the canvas gets more complex.

Here is a demo: https://jsfiddle.net/ax7n8944/

HTML:

<div id="canvasdiv" style="width: 500px; height: 250px; overflow: hidden">
    <canvas id="canvas" width="10000px" height="250px"></canvas>
</div>

JS:

var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
var context = canvas.getContext('2d');
var dragging = false;
var lastX;
var marginLeft = 0;

for (var i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    context.beginPath();
    context.arc(Math.random() * 10000, Math.random() * 250, 20.0, 0, 2 * Math.PI, false);
    context.stroke();
} 

canvas.addEventListener('mousedown', function(e) {
    var evt = e || event;
    dragging = true;
    lastX = evt.clientX;
    e.preventDefault();
}, false);

window.addEventListener('mousemove', function(e) {
    var evt = e || event;
    if (dragging) {
        var delta = evt.clientX - lastX;
        lastX = evt.clientX;
        marginLeft += delta;
        canvas.style.marginLeft = marginLeft + "px";
    }
    e.preventDefault();
}, false);

window.addEventListener('mouseup', function() {
    dragging = false;
}, false);
-1

It's better using Phaser Framework with the following plugin http://jdnichollsc.github.io/Phaser-Kinetic-Scrolling-Plugin/

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