17

I want to start by saying I did search first, and found a lot of similar issues on various other things, but not this problem exactly.

I have this code:

namespace New_Game.GameClasses
{
    /// <summary>
    /// This is a game component that implements IUpdateable.
    /// </summary>
    public class Error : Microsoft.Xna.Framework.GameComponent
    {
        bool gameOver = false;
        List<Enemy> enemies = new List<Enemy>();

        public bool gameOver {
            get { return gameOver; }
            set { gameOver = value; }
        }

        public override void Update(GameTime gameTime, Vector2 target)
        {
            // TODO: Add your update code here
            Rectangle playerRect = new Rectangle((int)target.X, (int)target.Y, 64, 64);

            foreach (Enemy e in enemies)
            {
                e.Target = target;
                e.Update(gameTime);
                Rectangle enemyRect = new Rectangle((int)e.Position.X + 7, (int)e.Position.Y + 7, 32 - 7, 32 - 7);

                if (playerRect.Intersects(enemyRect))
                {
                    gameOver = true;
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

My problem comes in an error saying this: Ambiguity between 'New_Game.GameClasses.Error.gameOver' and 'New_Game.GameClasses.Error.gameOver'

If I remove the get/set method, I run into a different error when I try and access gameOver from my Game1.cs. If I change it to the following I get the same error:

public bool gameOver { get; set; }

My question, is how do I resolve the ambiguity errors?

4 Answers 4

28

You need to rename your private gameOver variable. Change this:

bool gameOver = false;
public bool GameOver {
        get { return gameOver; }
        set { gameOver = value; }
    }

to

bool _gameOver = false;
public bool GameOver {
        get { return _gameOver; }
        set { _gameOver = value; }
    }

You can't use the same variable name in a single class.

Alternatively, assuming you're using a recent version of .Net, you could remove your private variable and just have:

public bool GameOver { get; set; }

Good luck.

2
  • 8
    +1. Also follwong default C# naming guidelines would avoid such problem to start with (capitalized for properties - GameOver, lower case for private fields - bool gameOver;). Jan 17, 2013 at 3:38
  • 1
    I'm new to C# so I didn't realize this was a naming guide line. I'd upvote if I had the points to, but I can't, so I'll just say thank you. :)
    – slooker
    Jan 17, 2013 at 3:44
2

Name your private variable differently than your public one.

bool _gameOver = false;

public bool gameOver {
    get { return _gameOver; }
    set { _gameOver = value; }
}
2

In my case it was resolved renaming the class agregarPropiedad by agregarPropiedad2.

.CS

public partial class agregarPropiedad2

Designer.CS

public partial class agregarPropiedad2

ASPX

Inherits="ProjectName.agregarPropiedad2"
1
  • Unfortunately, you don't write the reason, but your answer has helped me. We have a code generator, that generates (dynamically) access method code in VB.Net for SQL Server on the base of the datatable. We have naming conventions: XXX_Fieldname, whereby XXX has to be unique for any datatable. The code generator generates: class XXX and then properties for any field like XXX_Field1, XXX.Field2, and so on. That generates and ambiguity for any field in c# (I'm on the way to add c# in the generator). If I add an extension to the class name like class XXXObject, it works (why ever)... Apr 12, 2019 at 10:32
1

You can't have two components of your class using the same name. So change this:

bool gameOver = false;

public bool gameOver
{
    get { return gameOver; }
    set { gameOver = value; }
}

To this:

private Boolean m_GameOver = false;

public Boolean GameOver
{
    get { return m_GameOver; }
    set { m_GameOver = value; }
}

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