I have a deadlock problem with two transactions that do not access any common records. There is also no lock escalation. So I can't explain why a deadlock is possible.

The deadlock occurs when two such transactions are executed at the same time:

begin transaction

update A set [value] = [value]
where id = 1; /* resp. 2 */

/* synchronize transactions here */

SELECT * 
FROM  
 A inner join B on A.B_FK = B.id
 inner join C on C.A_FK = A.id
WHERE 
 A.[value] = 1; /* resp. 2 */

rollback;

These are the tables and data to setup the scenario:

CREATE TABLE A (
  id INT NOT NULL,
  [value] INT,
  B_FK INT
  primary key (id)
)

CREATE TABLE B (
  id INT NOT NULL,
  primary key (id)
)

CREATE TABLE C (
  id INT NOT NULL,
  A_FK INT
  primary key (id)
)

INSERT INTO A VALUES(1, 1, 1) 
INSERT INTO B VALUES(1) 
INSERT INTO C VALUES(1, 1) 

INSERT INTO A VALUES(2, 2, 2) 
INSERT INTO B VALUES(2) 
INSERT INTO C VALUES(2, 2) 

Table A is in the middle of three tables. If I change anything in the query, for instance remove one of the joined tables B or C, there is no deadlock. The same when I filter by A.id instead of A.value.

The deadlock-graph tells me that they both want to set an S lock to the primary key index of table A. Again: there is no lock escalation.

I'm using SqlServer 2005.

  • Why are these transactions conflicting without accessing any common data? Can anyone explain this?
  • What can I do to avoid it? I'm using NHibernate and can not change the query that easily.
  • Could it be an SqlServer issue?

Thanks a lot.

  • what does "/* synchronize transactions here */" mean? – Mitch Wheat Sep 17 '09 at 7:20
  • @Mitch: It means that I run transaction 1 until this point, then run transaction 2, which waits on the select, then I run transaction 1 to the end, which also waits on the select. – Stefan Steinegger Sep 17 '09 at 7:23
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The conflict could happen, because SQL-Server does locking not only on row level, but also on page or even table level.

That means a record can be locked even though it is not actually in use itself, but only a different record "nearby".

SQL Server Lock Contention Tamed might be helpful

  • Yes - if it can't obtain row-level locking, it escalates to page and then table. – user114600 Sep 17 '09 at 7:37
  • But isn't this a lock escalation? Shouldn't it be traced in the profiler? – Stefan Steinegger Sep 17 '09 at 7:39
  • From my understanding Sql Server could decide to use page locking from the start. In that case there would be no escalation. – Wolfgang Sep 17 '09 at 11:09
  • Thanks a lot to everyone. Simple answer to a complicated question... – Stefan Steinegger Sep 17 '09 at 11:32
  • The post's link is dead... – Lukas Eder May 18 '12 at 9:19

Also, another thing to consider when you sometimes get these problems is that the locking could come from processing done by triggers.

  • Fortunately, I don't have any triggers in the db. Thanks anyway. – Stefan Steinegger Sep 18 '09 at 6:46
  • Could you please elaborate on why triggers make any difference? – Eugene D. Gubenkov Oct 14 '16 at 8:35

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