// base function
function Man(name) {
  // private property
  var lover = "simron";
  // public property
  this.wife = "rocy";
  // privileged method
  this.getLover = function(){return lover};
  // public method
  Man.prototype.getWife = function(){return this.wife;};
}

// child function
function Indian(){
  var lover = "jothika"; 
  this.wife = "kamala";
}

Indian.prototype = aMan;
var aMan = new Man("raja");
oneIndian = new Indian();
oneIndian.getLover();

I got answer as "simron" but I expect "jothika".

How my understanding is wrong?

Thanks for any help.

  • 2
    It won't fix your problem, but I think you need to declare aMan before using it as the prototype for Indian. – Andy Sep 17 '09 at 9:35
  • 6
    This wins the "odd code samples of the day"-award, hands down. :) – Tomalak Sep 17 '09 at 9:35
  • 2
    @Andrew: He doesn't need to declare it (var is not an inline statement, vars are always treated as though they appear at the top of the scope), but he does need to initialize it. But you're right, that's not the basic problem, the pattern itself is the problem. – T.J. Crowder Sep 17 '09 at 9:41
  • Thanks for the clarification. – Andy Sep 17 '09 at 9:50
  • 1
    Javascript doesn't really have private variables because it isn't really OO. What you're really describing is variables across different scopes. It really is worth learning the difference as it will make understanding problems like this a lot easier. Douglas Crockford has written an excellent book on this: oreilly.com/catalog/9780596517748 – Keith Sep 17 '09 at 12:41
up vote 4 down vote accepted

First of all your code doesn't work at all and it's wrong.
Here's the code that works:

// base function
function Man(name) {
  // private property
  var lover = "simron";
  // public property
  this.wife = "rocy";
  // privileged method
  this.getLover = function(){return lover};
  // public method
  Man.prototype.getWife = function(){return this.wife;};
}

// child function
function Indian(){
  var lover = "jothika"; 
  this.wife = "kamala";
  this.getLover = function(){return lover};
}

Indian.prototype = new Man();
Indian.prototype.constructor = Indian;

var oneIndian = new Indian();
document.write(oneIndian.getLover());

aMan didn't exist until you declared it.
Also you should have set the ctor to Indian.
And at last, getLover is a closure that refers to Man and not to Indian.
Declaring it again refers it to the right scope.
See here and here for further details and improvements of your code.

  • 6
    A note for the OP: Each instance of Man and Indian will get its own copy of those functions, which can be a memory consumption issue. If you have three instances of Man, there are three copies of the getLover function in memory. – T.J. Crowder Sep 17 '09 at 9:57
  • I didn't code this to be perfect. I just wanted to show him whats wrong. +1 For the comment – the_drow Sep 17 '09 at 9:59
  • instead of this.getLover = function(){return lover}; below will do. Am i right @ T.J.Crowder Man.prototype = { getLover: function(){return lover;} } – rajakvk Sep 17 '09 at 10:05
  • @ the_drow If I have to define getLover in Indian also then what is purpose of inheritence. Can't I use parent class function to access child class's property? – rajakvk Sep 17 '09 at 10:14
  • 5
    getWife() should be assigned outside of the constructor: doing it inside totally defeats the purpose of assigning it to the prototype as you'll still create a new function object for each instance – Christoph Sep 17 '09 at 12:25

The getLover property on the instance refers to the closure you defined within the Man constructor. The lover local variable inside Man is the one in-scope for that function. The lover variable you declared inside Indian has nothing whatsoever to do with the one declared inside Man, no more than local variables declared inside other functions do.

For Indian to manipulate the private lover variable inside Man, you would have to give Indian some access to it via an accessor function -- but then everything would be able to change it via that same accessor function.

  • @ T.J.Crowder The fucntion inside Man this.getLover = function(){return lover}; is it not accessor function you mention? – rajakvk Sep 17 '09 at 9:58
  • It's an accessor (a getter), but for Indian to modify Man's copy of lover, Man would have to provide a setter as well. – T.J. Crowder Sep 17 '09 at 12:37
  • @T.J.Crowder But in my case, I don't want to modify anything; just want to get. – rajakvk Sep 17 '09 at 13:42
  • You want to modify it from Indian, apparently! :-) – T.J. Crowder Sep 17 '09 at 14:05

My advice: get rid of this whole priviledged method crap and don't try to shoehorn concepts from one language into another.

For performance reasons, methods should reside in the prototype. Otherwise, a new function object (which forms a closure over the constructor's local vaiables) has to be created for each instance, which is highly inefficient.

If you want to hide properties (ie 'private' fields), add a prefix like _private_ to their name and tell the programmer not to do stupid things.

  • 3
    Ever heard about Murphy's law? If it can be used incorrectly, it will! "Edward Murphy Jr. was a US Air Force engineer. He coined this infamous law after discovering a technician had systematically connected a whole row of devices upside down. Symmetric connectors permitted this avoidable mistake; afterward, he chose a different connector design." - from the book Code Craft. – Pablo Cabrera Sep 17 '09 at 12:52
  • @Pablo: Ever heard of square pegs in round holes or respecting the programmer? There just is no way to implement access protection mechanisms efficiently in JavaScript; so you can either penalize everyone or just make it clear whenever the programmer does something at his own risk; my vote is for the latter – Christoph Sep 17 '09 at 13:07
  • @Christoph: You can implement them efficiently in JavaScript, just not using the mechanisms in this thread (which as you know cause large per-instance overhead). For code libraries, I see a justification for doing it. For application code, though, I typically don't. – T.J. Crowder Sep 17 '09 at 13:20
  • @T.J.: How? All implementations I know either carry the large per-instance overhead or introduce side effects more severe than the original problem (eg having destructors which have to be called manually) – Christoph Sep 17 '09 at 13:28
  • @T.J.: did you mean something like this: stackoverflow.com/questions/483213/… (as you can see, I obviously know about such implementations;)) – Christoph Sep 17 '09 at 13:43

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