I want to do something like this, so npm install also installs the package.json of ../somelocallib or more importantly its dependencies.

"dependencies": {
    "express": "*",
    "../somelocallib": "*"
}

10 Answers 10

2014-Sep update

This feature was implemented in the version 2.0.0 of npm. Example:

{
  "name": "baz",
  "dependencies": {
    "bar": "file:../foo/bar"
  }
}

Any of the following paths are also valid:

../foo/bar
~/foo/bar
./foo/bar
/foo/bar

The local package will be copied to the prefix (./node-modules).


Old answer

Put somelocallib as dependency in your package.json as normal:

"dependencies": {
  "somelocallib": "0.0.x"
}

Then run npm link ../somelocallib and npm will install the version you're working on as a symlink.

app@0.0.1 /private/tmp/app
└── somelocallib@0.0.1 -> /private/tmp/somelocallib

Reference: link(1)

  • 3
    How we can unlink it? – AtaurRehman Asad Mar 27 '14 at 13:39
  • 1
    @AtaurRehmanAsad npm rm somelocallib should do the trick. have a look: github.com/npm/npm/issues/750 – danilopopeye Mar 28 '14 at 15:18
  • 8
    The downside of installing local packages with "npm link" is that you get a lot of module duplication. When you list your dependencies with "module: version" or "module: git-repo", npm install algorithm avoid to install a package that is already installed in a parent package. So with "npm link", if your main application depends on "async@0.8.0" and all your local packages also depends on "async@0.8.0" you'll end with all local packages installing the "async@0.8.0" instead of using the same installed "async" version of the main application. This doesn't happen using "npm install folder". – Pedro Ballesteros May 14 '14 at 14:11
  • 3
    @PedroBallesteros you can use the npm dedup to fix this problem. npmjs.org/doc/cli/npm-dedupe.html – danilopopeye Jun 20 '14 at 10:30
  • 1
    @danilopopeye I don't like what "npm dedup" makes with the dependency tree and the doc warns you about that: "Note that this operation transforms the dependency tree, and may result in packages getting updated versions, perhaps from the npm registry. This feature is experimental, and may change in future versions." – Pedro Ballesteros Jul 21 '14 at 16:54

It is now possible to specify local Node module installation paths in your package.json directly. From the docs:

Local Paths

As of version 2.0.0 you can provide a path to a local directory that contains a package. Local paths can be saved using npm install -S or npm install --save, using any of these forms:

../foo/bar
~/foo/bar
./foo/bar
/foo/bar

in which case they will be normalized to a relative path and added to your package.json. For example:

{
  "name": "baz",
  "dependencies": {
    "bar": "file:../foo/bar"
  }
}

This feature is helpful for local offline development and creating tests that require npm installing where you don't want to hit an external server, but should not be used when publishing packages to the public registry.

  • 17
    In npm v.3+, the normalization is absolute, not relative, so you will see something like "bar": "file:///home/user/src/foo/bar" – Ron Wertlen Feb 8 '16 at 22:30
  • 15
    How to update local path dependency without version incrementing? – Bohdan Lyzanets Apr 26 '16 at 15:51
  • 1
    By the way, this causes all kinds of trouble when and/or if you try to dockerize your node application, as the standard node:onbuild images only copy the current directory, and thus leave out anything in ../foo. – donmartin May 13 '16 at 15:26
  • 3
    is there any way to integrate this with git+ssh so one can either have a local copy of git repository that they npm install from or another git repository on the LAN? When I try the above and npm install from git+ssh it appears to look in the node_modules directory and not attempt to go over git+ssh even though that is how I am installing the top-level package. – Michael Jan 12 '17 at 23:26

This works for me.

Place the following in your package.json file

"scripts": {
    "preinstall": "npm install ../my-own-module/"
}
  • 3
    Thanks for the suggestion that doesn't require the use of "npm link" – ItalyPaleAle Mar 4 '14 at 23:46
  • It removed .gitignore in the module folder, created .npmignore and the first time I ran it applied 777 recursively on all folders except node_modules. But yes, it installed the dependencies. Using npm version 1.4.14. – L0LN1NJ4 Sep 12 '14 at 14:32
  • used this, but instead of messing with node_modules I've used app_modules – catalint Nov 28 '14 at 12:15
  • 1
    Why not "dependencies": { "my-own-module": "file:../my-own-module" } ? – Bohdan Lyzanets Apr 26 '16 at 15:40
  • 1
    I agree with @Bohdan here. localdependencies will do the exact same thing. The advantage of using npm link is that you don't need to do npm install each time to get your dependencies up to date. – froginvasion May 25 '16 at 11:52

If you want to further automate this, because you are checking your module into version control, and don't want to rely upon devs remembering to npm link, you can add this to your package.json "scripts" section:

"scripts": {
    "postinstall": "npm link ../somelocallib",
    "postupdate": "npm link ../somelocallib"
  }

This feels beyond hacky, but it seems to "work". Got the tip from this npm issue: https://github.com/isaacs/npm/issues/1558#issuecomment-12444454

  • 13
    Why postinstall and postupdate instead of preinstall and preupdate? – rightfold Apr 26 '14 at 14:34

This is how you will add local dependencies:

npm install file:src/assets/js/FILE_NAME

Add it to package.json from NPM:

npm install --save file:src/assets/js/FILE_NAME

Directly add to package.json like this:

....
  "angular2-autosize": "1.0.1",
  "angular2-text-mask": "8.0.2", 
  "animate.css": "3.5.2",
  "LIBRARY_NAME": "file:src/assets/js/FILE_NAME"
....

Actually, as of npm 2.0, there is support now local paths (see here).

  • 6
    Michael Trouw already gave this answer a few weeks before, so why duplicate? – Dan Dascalescu Oct 4 '16 at 19:14

I know that npm install ../somelocallib works.

However, I don't know whether or not the syntax you show in the question will work from package.json...

Unfortunately, doc seems to only mention URL as a dependency.

Try file:///.../...tar.gz, pointing to a zipped local lib... and tell us if it works.

  • 1
    I add "dependencies": { "somemodule":"file:///./internal_modules/somemodule" } to package.json. It doesn't work. Error code is "npm ERR! code E404". – Jeffrey Jan 10 '14 at 1:37

This worked for me: first, make sure the npm directories have the right user

sudo chown -R myuser ~/.npm
sudo chown -R myuser /usr/local/lib/node_modules

Then your in your package.json link the directory

"scripts": {
 "preinstall": "npm ln mylib ../../path/to/mylib"
}, 
"dependencies": {
  "mylib" : "*"
}

Curious.....at least on Windows (my npm is 3.something) I needed to do:

"dependencies": {
 "body-parser": "^1.17.1",
 "module1": "../module1",
 "module2": "../module2",

When I did an npm install ../module1 --save it resulted in absolute paths and not relative per the documentation.

I messed around a little more and determined that ../xxx was sufficient.

Specifically, I have the local node modules checked out to say d:\build\module1, d:\build\module2 and my node project (application) in d:\build\nodeApp.

To 'install', I:

d:\build\module1> rmdir "./node_modules" /q /s && npm install
d:\build\module2> rmdir "./node_modules" /q /s && npm install
d:\build\nodeApp> rmdir "./node_modules" /q /s && npm install

module1's package.json has a dependency of "module2": "../module2"; module2 has no local dependency; nodeApp has dependencies "module1": "../module1" and "module2": "../module2".

Not sure if this only works for me since all 3 folders (module1, module2 and nodeApp) sit on that same level.......

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