-2

I am trying to learn more about list containers and how to iterate through them, but it seems that g++ has no problem with it, but Visual Studio C++ pukes all over the place!

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <list>

using namespace std;

int main(){

   list <string> data;
   list <int>::iterator it;

   data.push_back("fee");
   data.push_back("fi");
   data.push_back("foo");
   data.push_back("fum");

   // something breaks back here ?!?!
  for(it=data.begin(); it!=data.end(); it++){
     cout << *it << endl;
  }

  return 0;

}
  • This code should make any compiler "puke" :) The only explanation is that you are trying to compile different code with each compiler. – UncleBens Sep 17 '09 at 14:04
  • I'd be very surprised if GCC compiled this code. – sbi Sep 17 '09 at 14:33
  • @sbi, as would I. GCC 4.1.2 rightly 'pukes' with the posted code and won't compile it for me – Glen Sep 17 '09 at 16:15
17

Try

list<string>::iterator

instead of

list<int>::iterator.
  • Man, that was dumb of me! thanks! – gjohnson Sep 17 '09 at 19:05
  • You're welcome. On StackOverflow you can express your thanks by selecting this answer (or Jesse's) as the "accepted answer". – Adam Mitz Sep 17 '09 at 23:42
11

gcc should "puke" here too (it does for me). You're assigning a list<string>::iterator to a list<int>::iterator, which are different types.

1

That's why in C++ 11 auto datatype was introduced.

See the example below;

   // C++ 11 auto
  for (auto it = data.begin(); it != data.end(); it++) // it is list<string>::iterator
  { 
     cout << *it << endl; 
  }

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