3

If I run UIView.StringSize from within some async code like a Task.ContinueWith, it will blow up with a UIKitThreadAccessException because that method starts with a call to UIApplication.EnsureUIThread ("Go to declaration" in MonoDevelop; I'm not sure the license allows me to post it here).

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
    // Blows up discretely...nothing written to application output.
    // Also blows up for UIViews that exist only in code (not rendered).
    SizeF textSize = someView.StringSize(someString, someFont, new SizeF(someView.Bounds.Width, float.MaxValue), UILineBreakMode.WordWrap);
    Console.WriteLine(textSize);
});

If I wrap this simplified version in InvokeOnMainThread, all is well, but I definitely have times when I want to measure some text without that call. As well, I fully understand the exception's purpose and it has saved me a bunch of hassle when called something deep within async code before, but in this case the use of EnsureUIThread here seems unnecessary. If I simply restate that call as a hit on the NSString class, it will happily run outside the UI thread.

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
    // Outputs expected size data: "{Width=##, Height=##}".
    using (NSString nssSomeString = new NSString(someString)) {
        SizeF textSize = nssSomeString.StringSize(someFont, new SizeF(someView.Bounds.Width, float.MaxValue), UILineBreakMode.WordWrap);
        Console.WriteLine(textSize);
    }
});

The code for UIView.StringSize appears to do roughly the same NSString work and there doesn't appear to be anything blatantly UI-thread-oriented. Is there something I am missing that would require this version of the method to be called from the UI thread?

Edit (2013-01-17):

I filed a bug with Xamarin just to see their response. It sounds like they are looking into marking this method as ThreadSafe.

5
  • I think all UI-realated code needs to be ran in main thread. It has been mentioned a few times in Apple's WWDC Videos.
    – Shane Hsu
    Jan 17 '13 at 18:39
  • That's actually the point of this question; is this actually UI-related? In MonoTouch, it seems like this is a UIView convenience shortcut (which it is) to the NSString method that isn't limited to the UI thread.
    – patridge
    Jan 17 '13 at 18:43
  • I don't think it matters, as you get access to things in your main view through that NSString-like UIView in MonoTouch, it must have some link to the actual UIView object.
    – Shane Hsu
    Jan 18 '13 at 4:27
  • If you "Go to definition" in MonoDevelop, you can see the actual code (or at least a decompiled version of it).
    – patridge
    Jan 18 '13 at 5:42
  • Maybe it's time for me to dig it up, kinda fun.
    – Shane Hsu
    Jan 18 '13 at 5:46
1

It is because your UIView is being access from a thread it wasn't created on. Since you are creating NSString in the background thread, your second example will work fine and is recommended. (Although I don't think you should try to access someView.Bounds from a background thread either)

I suspect this would also work:

var bounds = someView.Bounds; //UI thread
Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
    // Outputs expected size data: "{Width=##, Height=##}".
    using (UIView view = new UIView()) {
        SizeF textSize = view.StringSize(someString, someFont, new SizeF(bounds.Width, float.MaxValue), UILineBreakMode.WordWrap);
        Console.WriteLine(textSize);
    }
});

But I would just stick with NSString:

var bounds = someView.Bounds; //UI thread
Task.Factory.StartNew(() => {
    // Outputs expected size data: "{Width=##, Height=##}".
    using (NSString nssSomeString = new NSString(someString)) {
        SizeF textSize = nssSomeString.StringSize(someFont, new SizeF(bounds.Width, float.MaxValue), UILineBreakMode.WordWrap);
        Console.WriteLine(textSize);
    }
});
4
  • I'm definitely sold on using NSString.StringSize, and I will also agree that Bounds could be "in limbo" when hit outside the UI thread, but I would still argue you aren't actually accessing anything on the UIView itself that would open one up to a problem in this case; you are just calling a method that happens to be a part of that class. I'll toss a bug at Xamarin to see if there is some other reason for that choice.
    – patridge
    Jan 17 '13 at 19:30
  • No, this is not a bug. Accessing a UI object from a thread it was not created on is not allowed. This rule has existed in every UI platform I've worked with: iOS, Android, WPF, even back to WinForms. Jan 17 '13 at 20:49
  • I would argue that logic on semantics ("access" vs. "manipulate"), but I'm trying to argue that very point isn't relevant in this case. Calling StringSize is not manipulating a UIView object in any way, it is simply calling a utility method (which calls what appears to be another, UI-independent, NSString utility method) that happens to be made available through UIView instances. No UI changes appear to be possible through the use of that method. If so, ensuring it is called from the UI thread would be completely unnecessary.
    – patridge
    Jan 17 '13 at 21:10
  • I think this is still something Apple has defined: developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/UIKit/Reference/… There is a section stating these methods should be only called from a main thread. I believe Xamarin is checking against the thread the object was created on to throw this exception for you. Jan 18 '13 at 14:35
0

The UI restriction on the StringSize method is indeed unnecessary. Xamarin has already fixed this for "v6.0.10+".

We already detremined that DrawString (drawInRect:* selectors) were fine from other threads. StringSize is a subset of that feature so it should be safe to. Future versions (6.0.10+) will be marked as [ThreadSafe].

Until you are coding against the updated version, the NSString version will work just fine.

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