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Can someone please explain the purpose of the bitwise, Binary AND Operator( & ) and how to use it? I was looking at different ways of making a isprime function and came across this.

def isprime(n):
    # make sure n is a positive integer
    n = abs(int(n))
    # 0 and 1 are not primes
    if n < 2:
        return False
    # 2 is the only even prime number
    if n == 2: 
        return True    
    # all other even numbers are not primes
    if not n & 1: 
        return False
    # range starts with 3 and only needs to go up the squareroot of n
    # for all odd numbers (counts by 2's)
    for x in range(3, int(n**0.5)+1, 2):
        if n % x == 0:
            return False
    return True

I also looked at Python Bitwise Operators Example but couldn't grasp it.

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    Please don't place tag information in your question title. The tag system here is extremely effective and doesn't need any help. :-) I also removed some unnecessary tags, as the two remaining ones are sufficient to identify your question's topic and allow it to be found in searches by future readers. – Ken White Jan 18 '13 at 1:48
  • @KenWhite Okay, Thanks for the help. – Crispy Jan 18 '13 at 1:50
  • This is an unpythonic use of &. It is not any faster than using n % 2 and it is less clear. – wim Jan 18 '13 at 1:56
  • Also, you might consider using the all function and a genex to replace the for loop. – wim Jan 18 '13 at 1:58
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One number AND another is the bits of one number masked by the bits of another number. If a number AND 1 is 0 (not n & 1 would be True), that means it's divisible by two, since all multiples of 2 have a 0 as the rightmost binary digit.

  11 = 00001011 (Not divisible by 2)      28 = 00011100 (Divisible by 2)
&  1 = 00000001                         &  1 = 00000001
---------------                         ---------------
       00000001                                00000000
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  • Awesome, this will come in handy. Thanks for the help. – Crispy Jan 18 '13 at 1:49
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For example,

12 & 7 = 1100 & 0111 = 0100 = 4

For the isPrime function, the first condition checks whether it is 0 or 1. The second condition checks whether it is 2. The third condition then checks if (n&1), which is a check whether the number is even. Every even number when converted to binary form has 0 in its last digit. So for example,

14 & 1 = 1110 & 0001 = 0

14 is proved to be even and henceforth not prime.

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