13

My code:

DECLARE report_date DATETIME;
set report_date='2013-01-17 00:00:00';

SELECT  *
  FROM `NMPP`.`capacitypersecond` 
  WHERE `StreamDT` >=report_date and `StreamDT` < '2013-01-18 00:00:00'  ;

SELECT  *
  FROM `NMPP`.`capacityperHr` 
  WHERE `StreamDT` >=report_date and `StreamDT` < '2013-01-18 00:00:00'  ;

SELECT  *
  FROM `NMPP`.`capacityperDay` 
  WHERE `TJLDate` >=report_date and `TJLDate` < '2013-01-18 00:00:00'  ;

-

DECLARE report_date DATETIME;
/* SQL Error (1064): You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'DECLARE report_date DATETIME' at line 1 */
/* Affected rows: 0  Found rows: 0  Warnings: 0  Duration for 0 of 5 queries: 0.000 sec. */
  • Is this inside a BEGIN/END statement? Because that's the only place where DECLARE is legal. – Jon Jan 18 '13 at 9:49
  • Could you provide more information? What version of MySQL are you using, are you declaring this inside a stored procedure, etc.? – Bastien Jansen Jan 18 '13 at 9:50
  • @Jon not in begin/end, then how to declare it in a sql file? – Scott 混合理论 Jan 18 '13 at 9:51
  • 1
    Then you have to set it like set @report_date:='2013-01-17 00:00:00'; then use it in the query like @report_date – bonCodigo Jan 18 '13 at 9:52
7

get rid of declare:

set @report_date = '2013-01-17 00:00:00';

SELECT  *
  FROM `NMPP`.`capacitypersecond` 
  WHERE `StreamDT` >= @report_date and `StreamDT` < '2013-01-18 00:00:00'  ;
  • Yes and refer to your variable with @ like @report_date in query – PUG May 4 '15 at 18:27
  • -1. Yes why should we get rid of DECLARE ? the way you solved it is by using user defined variables ignoring the proper way to declare a variable as DATETIME. – Ehsan Jul 30 '15 at 17:57
  • @Ehsan because op says the code is not inside begin/end block in the comments. – palindrom Jul 31 '15 at 8:22
  • Thanks for the comment. If so then the proper answer is to define a begin/end block to wrap the DECLARE statement. The problem with user defined variables is that they are loosely typed and stay out of the scope of a stored procedure. – Ehsan Jul 31 '15 at 9:11
13

or with cast:

set @report_date = cast('2013-01-17 00:00:00' as datetime);
  • Yes and refer to your variable with @ like @report_date in query – PUG May 4 '15 at 18:28
0

All the DECLARE should be at the start of the trigger,stored procedure.

This is not a C++ like language where you can mix declarations and statements, but more like C, where all declarations must be done before all statements.

  • True, but it isn't relevant to the question because putting at the top a declaration of type DATETIME does not work. – Tongfa May 4 '18 at 23:22

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