128

I am getting this warning on Sonar. I want solution to remove this warning on Sonar Qube.

My class is like this :

public class FilePathHelper {
    private static String resourcesPath;
    public static String getFilePath(HttpServletRequest request) {
        if(resourcesPath == null) {
            String serverpath = request.getSession().getServletContext().getRealPath("");               
            resourcesPath = serverpath + "/WEB-INF/classes/";   
        }
        return resourcesPath;       
    }
}

i want proper solution to remove this warning on sonar.

1

11 Answers 11

230

If this class is only a utility class, you should make the class final and define a private constructor:

public final class FilePathHelper {
   private FilePathHelper() {
      //not called
   }
}

This prevents the default parameter-less constructor from being used elsewhere in your code.

Additionally, you can make the class final, so that it can't be extended in subclasses, which is a best practice for utility classes. Since you declared only a private constructor, other classes wouldn't be able to extend it anyway, but it is still a best practice to mark the class as final.

12
  • 11
    final is actually redundant: a class with nothing but private constructors is already effectively final. No harm done by marking it, though. Jan 18, 2013 at 12:23
  • 19
    You must mark the class as final for Sonar to actually consider the violation solved. Just adding private constructor doesn't clear the violation.
    – Cebence
    Apr 23, 2013 at 11:19
  • 4
    Is there some Sonar rule that I need to enable for this? I have made my utility class final and have a private constructor. The constructor is now marked as the "uncovered line"
    – Karthick S
    Aug 11, 2014 at 7:15
  • 6
    Indeed, how are you supposed to test/cover such 'unreachable' code?
    – dokaspar
    Jun 11, 2015 at 20:25
  • 12
    So we should add unnecessary code to our classes, just to make some analysis tools happy? Someone can extend or instantiate this class. So what? Why is this critical? Can cause some errors? Or why should I even use tools like PowerMock to test a never used private constructor, just to fulfill the requirements of Sonar and my code coverage tool? Oct 26, 2016 at 10:49
21

I don't know Sonar, but I suspect it's looking for a private constructor:

private FilePathHelper() {
    // No-op; won't be called
}

Otherwise the Java compiler will provide a public parameterless constructor, which you really don't want.

(You should also make the class final, although other classes wouldn't be able to extend it anyway due to it only having a private constructor.)

12

I use an enum with no instances

public enum MyUtils { 
    ; // no instances
    // class is final and the constructor is private

    public static int myUtilityMethod(int x) {
        return x * x;
    }
}

you can call this using

int y = MyUtils.myUtilityMethod(5); // returns 25.
5
  • Can you please show us more codes for this solution? About using enum as a utility class?
    – Jin Kwon
    Feb 26, 2016 at 13:05
  • @JinKwon I have added an example. Do you have a specific doubt? Feb 26, 2016 at 13:09
  • 1
    No, I just wanted to know an example. Thanks. I've never though about this way.
    – Jin Kwon
    Feb 26, 2016 at 13:17
  • I usually use Enums for Utility classes, but checkstyle 7.0 for JDK8 does NOT work with the example provided... Jul 12, 2016 at 20:51
  • @MarcellodeSales I haven't tried checkstyle for many years. I prefer tools which don't just find problems but have auto-fixes for them as well. ;) Jul 13, 2016 at 7:45
10

Best practice is to throw an error if the class is constructed.

Example:

/**
 * The Class FooUtilityService.
 */
final class FooUtilityService{

/**
* Instantiates a new FooUtilityService. Private to prevent instantiation
*/
private FooUtilityService() {

    // Throw an exception if this ever *is* called
    throw new AssertionError("Instantiating utility class.");
}
3
  • 2
    Why is this best practice? What are we gaining here? There is stupidity at all levels, but adding these lines just to prevent instantiation (which is fairly harmless in these cases) seems overkill, considering the half a dozen lines of code noise this introduces to an otherwise clean class with say only constants in it.
    – john16384
    Feb 17, 2020 at 11:20
  • @john16384 This is "best practice" in terms of satisfying modern static code analyzers which the language creators would agree is proper. Whether this is "best practice" for you, in your job, etc. depends on how your organization views this kind of thing. If your boss puts a high priority on static code analysis and squelching warnings or even "info" then your argument should be directed there. In a large team environment, it may not be good to assume everyone working on the code knows not to instantiate any given class. This probably falls into the realm of "defensive coding". Dec 4, 2020 at 17:43
  • 2
    @ThomasCarlisle the language creators didn't create those code analyzers; useless warnings are something that you can turn off (like the infamous missing serialVersionId warning when not using serialization anywhere in your project) -- instead the tool should warn at the use site when someone is instantiating this class only to get access to a constant; people complain Java is verbose, and satisfying arbitrary unproven rules pushed upon us by poorly tuned "default" profiles in code analyzers ain't helping.
    – john16384
    Dec 5, 2020 at 8:24
7

You can just use Lombok annotation to avoid unnecessary initialization.

Using @NoArgsConstructor with AccessLevel.PRIVATE as bellow:

@NoArgsConstructor(access = AccessLevel.PRIVATE)
public class FilePathHelper {
   // your code 
}
2

I recommend just disabling this rule in Sonar, there is no real benefit of introducing a private constructor, just redundant characters in your codebase other people need to read and computer needs to store and process.

5
  • There is a benefit. It will prevent the accidental creation of a redundant instance of the class.
    – Stephen C
    Mar 23, 2021 at 5:16
  • That's why I say "real benefit". I know about the "reasoning" behind this rule. But is that a real problem? This can not happen - somebody should write code to create the class, so that's not accidental. And if someone has created an instance he does not need, it's their problem. In short, this does not deserve to worry about, and does not justify the extra characters in your code base, in my opinion.
    – user431640
    Mar 23, 2021 at 14:39
  • It is worse than that. u.method() looks like an instance method. But if u is an instance of a UtilityClass and (naturally) method is static, then we have some misleading code. The real utility of a private constructor is that it absolutely prevents that. (Have I seen it? Yes!) Whose problem is it? The programmer using your class. And by extension you ... because you designed the utility class to be instantiable.
    – Stephen C
    Mar 23, 2021 at 15:21
  • Sonar is not just for the benefit of the programmer writing the code. It is also for the benefit of other programmers who need to use the code that the first programmer wrote.
    – Stephen C
    Mar 23, 2021 at 23:00
  • 2
    If you like that, enable the sonar rule and adhere it. I personally don't want those extra charactes in my code. And don't worry, that person who was creating the Utility class instances won't be stopped from creating problems by the private constructor. He can always introduce endless loops, memory leaks, factor code in a way that it is unmanageble, or simply burn down the office.
    – user431640
    Mar 30, 2021 at 1:29
1

Alternative using Lombok is use @UtilityClass annotation.

@UtilityClass was introduced as an experimental feature in Lombok v1.16.2:

If a class is annotated with @UtilityClass, the following things happen to it:

  • It is marked final.
  • If any constructors are declared in it, an error is generated.
    • Otherwise, a private no-args constructor is generated; it throws a UnsupportedOperationException.
  • All methods, inner classes, and fields in the class are marked static.

Overview:

A utility class is a class that is just a namespace for functions. No instances of it can exist, and all its members are static. For example, java.lang.Math and java.util.Collections are well known utility classes.

This annotation automatically turns the annotated class into one.

A utility class cannot be instantiated.

By marking your class with @UtilityClass, lombok will automatically generate a private constructor that throws an exception, flags as error any explicit constructors you add, and marks the class final.

If the class is an inner class, the class is also marked static.

All members of a utility class are automatically marked as static. Even fields and inner classes.

Example:

import lombok.experimental.UtilityClass;

@UtilityClass
public class FilePathHelper {

    private static String resourcesPath;

    public static String getFilePath(HttpServletRequest request) {
        if(resourcesPath == null) {
            ServletContext context = request.getSession().getServletContext();
            String serverpath = context.getRealPath("");               
            resourcesPath = serverpath + "/WEB-INF/classes/";   
        }
        return resourcesPath;       
    }
}

Reference from official documentation:

-1

Add private constructor:

private FilePathHelper(){
    super();
}
1
  • 9
    welcome to stackoverflow! unfortunately this answer does not add any new information to the already given answers. and it's always better to elaborate a little more about how and why the code solves the problem.
    – René Vogt
    May 4, 2016 at 5:26
-1
public class LmsEmpWfhUtils {    
    private LmsEmpWfhUtils() 
    { 
    // prevents access default paramater-less constructor
    }
}

This prevents the default parameter-less constructor from being used elsewhere in your code.

-1

SonarQube documentation recommends adding static keyword to the class declaration.

That is, change public class FilePathHelper to public static class FilePathHelper.

Alternatively you can add a private or protected constructor.

public class FilePathHelper
{
    // private or protected constructor
    // because all public fields and methods are static
    private FilePathHelper() {
    }
}
1
  • That's a C# documentation.
    – rogue lad
    Feb 26, 2019 at 16:13
-3

make the utility class final and add a private constructor

1
  • 2
    welcome to stackoverflow! unfortunately this answer does not add any new information to the already given answers. and it's always better to elaborate a little more about how and why the code solves the problem. – René Vogt May 4 '16 at 5:26 Apr 19, 2018 at 0:38

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