47

There is this How do you split a list into evenly sized chunks? for splitting an array into chunks. Is there anyway to do this more efficiently for giant arrays using Numpy?

  • sorry i'm still looking for an efficient answer ;). right now i'm thinking ctypes is the only efficient way. – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Dec 30 '13 at 22:10
  • 2
    Define efficient. Give some sample data, your current method, how fast it is, and how fast you need it to be. – Prashant Kumar Dec 31 '13 at 18:19
69

Try numpy.array_split.

From the documentation:

>>> x = np.arange(8.0)
>>> np.array_split(x, 3)
    [array([ 0.,  1.,  2.]), array([ 3.,  4.,  5.]), array([ 6.,  7.])]

Identical to numpy.split, but won't raise an exception if the groups aren't equal length.

If number of chunks > len(array) you get blank arrays nested inside, to address that - if your split array is saved in a, then you can remove empty arrays by:

[x for x in a if x.size > 0]

Just save that back in a if you wish.

  • how can you remove the empty lists though? – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Jan 18 '13 at 20:42
  • Can you provide a small example? – Prashant Kumar Jan 28 '13 at 22:48
  • if # chunks > len(array) you get blank arrays nested inside. – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Jan 29 '13 at 7:50
  • I simply wouldn't use # chunks > len(array), but I have included a second step which should remove empty arrays. Let me know if this works. – Prashant Kumar Jan 29 '13 at 15:08
  • 1
    yes that was what I was using ... but anyway to do that w/ numpy? List comprehensions in python are slow. – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Jan 29 '13 at 18:45
19

Just some examples on usage of array_split, split, hsplit and vsplit:

n [9]: a = np.random.randint(0,10,[4,4])

In [10]: a
Out[10]: 
array([[2, 2, 7, 1],
       [5, 0, 3, 1],
       [2, 9, 8, 8],
       [5, 7, 7, 6]])

Some examples on using array_split:
If you give an array or list as second argument you basically give the indices (before) which to 'cut'

# split rows into 0|1 2|3
In [4]: np.array_split(a, [1,3])
Out[4]:                                                                                                                       
[array([[2, 2, 7, 1]]),                                                                                                       
 array([[5, 0, 3, 1],                                                                                                         
       [2, 9, 8, 8]]),                                                                                                        
 array([[5, 7, 7, 6]])]

# split columns into 0| 1 2 3
In [5]: np.array_split(a, [1], axis=1)                                                                                           
Out[5]:                                                                                                                       
[array([[2],                                                                                                                  
       [5],                                                                                                                   
       [2],                                                                                                                   
       [5]]),                                                                                                                 
 array([[2, 7, 1],                                                                                                            
       [0, 3, 1],
       [9, 8, 8],
       [7, 7, 6]])]

An integer as second arg. specifies the number of equal chunks:

In [6]: np.array_split(a, 2, axis=1)
Out[6]: 
[array([[2, 2],
       [5, 0],
       [2, 9],
       [5, 7]]),
 array([[7, 1],
       [3, 1],
       [8, 8],
       [7, 6]])]

split works the same but raises an exception if an equal split is not possible

In addition to array_split you can use shortcuts vsplit and hsplit.
vsplit and hsplit are pretty much self-explanatry:

In [11]: np.vsplit(a, 2)
Out[11]: 
[array([[2, 2, 7, 1],
       [5, 0, 3, 1]]),
 array([[2, 9, 8, 8],
       [5, 7, 7, 6]])]

In [12]: np.hsplit(a, 2)
Out[12]: 
[array([[2, 2],
       [5, 0],
       [2, 9],
       [5, 7]]),
 array([[7, 1],
       [3, 1],
       [8, 8],
       [7, 6]])]
  • 1
    my problem with this is that if chunks > len(array) then you get blank nested arrays ... how do you get rid of that? – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Jan 29 '13 at 7:48
  • 1
    Good examples, thank you. In your np.array_split(a, [1], axis=1) example, do you know how to prevent the first array from having every single element nested? – timgeb Jan 4 '16 at 8:11
7

I believe that you're looking for numpy.split or possibly numpy.array_split if the number of sections doesn't need to divide the size of the array properly.

  • same question as I asked Prashant. How can you get rid of the empty numpy arrays? – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Jan 18 '13 at 20:44
7

Not quite an answer, but a long comment with nice formatting of code to the other (correct) answers. If you try the following, you will see that what you are getting are views of the original array, not copies, and that was not the case for the accepted answer in the question you link. Be aware of the possible side effects!

>>> x = np.arange(9.0)
>>> a,b,c = np.split(x, 3)
>>> a
array([ 0.,  1.,  2.])
>>> a[1] = 8
>>> a
array([ 0.,  8.,  2.])
>>> x
array([ 0.,  8.,  2.,  3.,  4.,  5.,  6.,  7.,  8.])
>>> def chunks(l, n):
...     """ Yield successive n-sized chunks from l.
...     """
...     for i in xrange(0, len(l), n):
...         yield l[i:i+n]
... 
>>> l = range(9)
>>> a,b,c = chunks(l, 3)
>>> a
[0, 1, 2]
>>> a[1] = 8
>>> a
[0, 8, 2]
>>> l
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]
  • +1) that's a good point to consider, you could extend your solution further to handle certain multidim. cases – Theodros Zelleke Jan 18 '13 at 20:55
  • yes at the moment I use that. I was wondering of a nicer way to do that using numpy. esp. with multi-dim :( – Eiyrioü von Kauyf Jan 29 '13 at 7:49
  • This is relevant for larger data. I am using numpy.array_split which appears to make copies of the data. Passing that to your multiprocessing pool will make yet another copy of the data... – displayname Jan 11 '18 at 18:19

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