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Possible Duplicate:
How to get height for NSAttributedString at a fixed width

Now NSAttributedString is available in iOS 6. For layout purposes, I want to know how to calculate the required height of an NSAttributedString under fixed width. I'm looking for something that's equivalent to NSString's - (CGSize)sizeWithFont:(UIFont *)font constrainedToSize:(CGSize)size but for NSAttributedString.

To calculate the drawing size of NSAttributedStrings, there are two methods available:

  1. - (CGSize)size can't be used because it does not take any width into consideration.
  2. I tried - (CGRect)boundingRectWithSize:(CGSize)size options:(NSStringDrawingOptions)options context:(NSStringDrawingContext *)context, but somehow it doesn't give me the correct height. I think the method is buggy. If I run the following code, it gives me bounding size: 572.324951, 19.000000 ignoring the given width of 200. It should give me something like 100 of height.
    NSMutableAttributedString *attributedString = [[NSMutableAttributedString alloc] init];
    NSDictionary *attributes = @{NSFontAttributeName : [UIFont fontWithName:@"HelveticaNeue" size:15], NSForegroundColorAttributeName : [UIColor blueColor]};
    [attributedString appendAttributedString:[[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Attributed String\n" attributes:attributes]];
    [attributedString appendAttributedString:[[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Attributed String\n" attributes:attributes]];
    [attributedString appendAttributedString:[[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Attributed String\n" attributes:attributes]];
    [attributedString appendAttributedString:[[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Attributed String\n" attributes:attributes]];
    [attributedString appendAttributedString:[[NSAttributedString alloc] initWithString:@"Attributed String\n" attributes:attributes]];

    CGRect frame = [attributedString boundingRectWithSize:CGSizeMake(200, 1000) options:0 context:nil];
    NSLog(@"bounding size: %f, %f", frame.size.width, frame.size.height);

There are other methods available for Mac OS X, but not for iOS.

  • 9
    @SimonGoldeen That's not a good duplicate. The accepted answer doesn't actually give the height and the other answers don't show the proper way to use the boundingRectWithSize:options:context: method. – rmaddy Jan 19 '13 at 1:01
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    In Swift, this can be done by let desiredWidth: CGFloat = 300; let rect = attrStr.boundingRect(with: CGSize(width: desiredWidth, height: CGFloat.greatestFiniteMagnitude), options: [.usesLineFragmentOrigin, .usesFontLeading], context: nil) – Jake Jan 10 at 6:11
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Option 2 does work in iOS with the proper parameters.

NSAttributedString *attrStr = ... // your attributed string
CGFloat width = 300; // whatever your desired width is
CGRect rect = [attrStr boundingRectWithSize:CGSizeMake(width, 10000) options:NSStringDrawingUsesLineFragmentOrigin | NSStringDrawingUsesFontLeading context:nil];

Without the proper values for the options parameter you will get the wrong height.

It is also required that attrStr contains a font attribute. Without a font, there is no way to properly calculate the size.

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    Hmm... not working for me. I seem to get good calculations about only half the time. – Dogweather Mar 15 '13 at 9:01
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    Finally a simple and functional way to calculate the size of a NSAttributedString that works even with very complex formatting. Other answers to similar questions go as far as creating a category on NSAttributedString - thankfully it does not have to be that hard. – SaltyNuts Sep 23 '13 at 15:06
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    @Dogweather In my experience, the NSAttributedString must have a NSFontAttributeName key to be sized correctly. – bentford Jan 9 '14 at 22:46
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    @bentford THANK YOU for that tip - I was creating an attributed string with the -initWithString: method, and that resulted in completely arbitrary computed sizes. Using -initWithString:attributes: works! – David Ganster Aug 8 '14 at 11:20
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    We probably want to use CGFLOAT_MAX for the size parameter, rather than 10000 which, at some point in time, might actually fit on our screens... – nhgrif Jun 8 '15 at 13:04

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