This is a pretty deep topic I guess, so any url's with insight info is also gladly accepted. I've been working a lot with native directx, never managed. On the other hand, mostly when developing other type of applications that don't have any need for advanced gpu rendering I usually stick to managed code such as C#. Starting to favor C# more and more, I've been thinking about trying out some managed directx.

So my question is if there are any remarkable cons and pros of using managed directx. Of course I'm mostly interested in potential drawbacks.

If I don't answer I probably had to go. Then I'll make sure to answer first thing tomorrow! I look forward to hear your replies.

Jonas

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Managed DirectX has been deprecated by Microsoft. You can still use it but it's probably not your best choice any more. Alternatives include XNA, SlimDX and the new managed wrappers in the Windows API Code Pack.

  • Ah I see. Thanks for the input. I've read quite a lot about XNA which is pretty interesting. But it feels like they in some ways force simplicity on the developer, which can in some cases be good and in some annoying. Though I do not know enough about the topic to discuss it. I guess I'll have to give it a try first and see. Thanks – Jonas B Sep 17 '09 at 22:27
  • Also, since XNA and managed directx in a way are different things in terms of framework, XNA falls a bit out of topic in this discussion. So I guess this is pretty much the answer to my question, thanks again! – Jonas B Sep 17 '09 at 22:30

Another alternative to the now deprecated "Managed DirectX" is SharpDx. This has been benchmarked against XNA, SlimDX and the windows API code pack with favourable results.

  • Thanks, this is interesting to say the least, even for a very late answer. I have a new project and I will likely be using this! – Jonas B Mar 28 '12 at 7:01
  • SharpDX is also quite up-to-date, with Windows 8 metro support in place – Justin Stenning Apr 11 '12 at 11:24

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