4

I'm writing a Line class to make numerical methods and I want these operators (*, +, -) to make my code more readable and easier to understand.

        #include <vector>

        using namespace std;

        typedef vector<double> Vector;

        class Line : public Vector
        {
        public:
            Line();
            ~Line();

            Line operator+(Line);
            Line operator-(Line);
            Line operator*(double);
        };


        Line Line::operator*(double alfa)
        {
            Line temp;
            int n = size();
            temp.resize(n);
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            {
                temp.at(i) = this->at(i)*alfa;
            }
            return temp;
        }

        Line Line::operator+(Line line)
        {
            int n = size();
            Line temp;
            temp.resize(n);
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            {
                temp.at(i) = this->at(i) + line[i];
            }
            return temp;
        }

        Line Line::operator-(Line line)
        {
            int n = size();
            Line temp;
            temp.resize(n);
            for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            {
                temp.at(i) = this->at(i) - line[i];
            }
            return temp;
        }


        int main()
        {
            return 0;
        }

Is it possible to overload such operators from Vector class? should I just make functions (or methods) instead of operators? any other suggestions?

ps1: I'm using Visual Studio 11 as compiler.

ps2: I have not started the project as 'win32 project', it's console application.

I'm geting the following errors:

Error   1   error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: __thiscall Line::Line(void)" (??0Line@@QAE@XZ) referenced in function "public: class Line __thiscall Line::operator*(double)" (??DLine@@QAE?AV0@N@Z) C:\Users\Lucas\Documents\Visual Studio 11\Projects\test\test\test.obj   test


Error   2   error LNK2019: unresolved external symbol "public: __thiscall Line::~Line(void)" (??1Line@@QAE@XZ) referenced in function "public: class Line __thiscall Line::operator*(double)" (??DLine@@QAE?AV0@N@Z)    C:\Users\Lucas\Documents\Visual Studio 11\Projects\test\test\test.obj   test
6
  • 3
    Inheriting from std::vector is a very bad idea. Also, you never defined your ctor/dtor.
    – chris
    Jan 19, 2013 at 23:54
  • Should I just make functions then, or do you have another idea? Jan 19, 2013 at 23:57
  • 1
    It's usually better to just stick with composition for the standard containers.
    – chris
    Jan 19, 2013 at 23:59
  • Operators are fine, but use aggregation. Jan 19, 2013 at 23:59
  • 2
    Have you looked at en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/header/valarray ?
    – rici
    Jan 20, 2013 at 1:06

4 Answers 4

6

You have to overload the operators at global scope:

vector<double> operator*(const vector<double>& v, double alfa)
{
    ...
}

vector<double> operator+(const vector<double>& v1, const vector<double>& v2)
{
    ...
}

vector<double> operator-(const vector<double>& v1, const vector<double>& v2)
{
    ...
}

As for the linker errors, it just looks like you didn't implement the Line constructor and destructor.

2
  • 1
    It is, in my unsolicited opinion, not a great idea to overload operators that only take arguments of types which are not your own, especially in the global scope, where some other silly library may have done the same. Jan 20, 2013 at 0:31
  • @BenjaminLindley Yes, this is why it is explicitly forbidden by the standard - templates have to be parameterized with user types first.
    – StaceyGirl
    Mar 26, 2020 at 17:30
2

You should never inherit from std-classes which are not meant for inheritance. Inheriting from classes which do not have a virtual destructor is very dangerous.

I'd suggest you use aggregation: Make your Line class contain a member of vector type, named myVector_ for example, and implement the desired operators in a way that they use this member variable.

So you replace all calls to size() to myVector.size() etc:

Line Line::operator*(double alfa)
{
    Vector temp;
    int n = myVector_.size();
    temp.resize(n);
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        temp.at(i) = myVector_.at(i)*alfa;
    }
    return temp;
}
3
  • I have tried that to, but the main problem is with the [] operator I couldn't make it return the pointer. for instance: A[i][j] = something.... Didn't work, I would have to type something like: A[i].v.at(j) = something... To make it work. ty for ctor/dtor I didn't know about that. Jan 20, 2013 at 0:00
  • What exactly do you mean by that? return myVector_[i]; should be no problem if the function's return type is correct Jan 20, 2013 at 0:01
  • Or do you mean you want to access the internal array? Just use &myVector_[0] or myVector_.data() if you use C++ 11 Jan 20, 2013 at 0:03
1

The linker error tells you that your code is missing definitions of two member functions that you declared - the constructor and the destructor:

Line::Line() {
    // Code of the constructor goes here
}

Line::~Line() {
    // Code of the destructor goes here
}
0

Surely the correct thing is to have a Vector object INSIDE line, and not "inherit" from Vector? Generally inheriting from std:: containers is not a great data... I'm pretty sure a "Line" is not actually a vector, it's a "has a" vector. [The rule for "when you inherit" is "X is a Y", where you make a composite object when "X has a Y" - so there is a Y inside X.]

You will need to declare your constructor and destructor to get rid of your linking error.

I would also use const Line& as your input to the math operations, as you neve alter the input.

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