2

Not entirely sure if this should go here or another stack exchange, but here goes:

see the following output from my shell:

$ echo $PATH
/opt/local/bin:/opt/local/sbin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin:/usr/local/bin

$ which vim
/usr/bin/vim

$ /opt/local/bin/vim --version
VIM - Vi IMproved 7.3 (2010 Aug 15, compiled Jan  9 2013 03:19:25)
MacOS X (unix) version
Included patches: 1-244, 246-762

$ vim --version
VIM - Vi IMproved 7.3 (2010 Aug 15, compiled Aug 22 2012 15:36:46)
Compiled by root@apple.com

As you can see, /opt/local/bin/vim should take precedence over which vim as per $PATH definition, however it does not.

Anyone have a clue?


In the end, I noticed I had an export PATH=.... in my .zshrc. So if anybody has the same problem, check for that first ;)

closed as off topic by Jonathan Leffler, Oldskool, Gajotres, Laurent Etiemble, jv42 Jan 21 '13 at 12:35

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5

Did you install vim into /opt/local/bin during this shell session? Bash (and probably other shells) saves the results of path lookups into a hash table. You can verify this by asking for type vim. This is like which except it's a builtin that will return results from this hashtable if they exist. More usefully, type returns precisely what will be executed by the shell.

You can also use the hash builtin to specifically query the saved lookups. Use hash -t vim to see what the entry is in the hashtable for vim, and use hash -d vim to remove vim from this hashtable, allowing the shell to look it up in $PATH again the next time.


I just re-checked your original description and noticed that which vim actually returned /usr/bin/vim. Since which doesn't use the hashtable that I described above, this actually suggests that your problem was different. Perhaps your $PATH had some sort of invisible character in the first component?

  • Ugh. I forgot that I have my PATH defined in my .zshrc . Thank you for your pointers, I learned something new :) – user827080 Jan 21 '13 at 8:15