4

I'm running Java on a Unix platform. How can I get a list of all mounted filesystems via the Java 1.6 API?

I've tried File.listRoots() but that returns a single filesystem (that is, /). If I use df -h I see more than that:

Filesystem      Size   Used  Avail Capacity   iused     ifree %iused  Mounted on
/dev/disk0s2   931Gi  843Gi   87Gi    91% 221142498  22838244   91%   /
devfs          187Ki  187Ki    0Bi   100%       646         0  100%   /dev
map -hosts       0Bi    0Bi    0Bi   100%         0         0  100%   /net
map auto_home    0Bi    0Bi    0Bi   100%         0         0  100%   /home
/dev/disk1s2   1.8Ti  926Gi  937Gi    50% 242689949 245596503   50%   /Volumes/MyBook
/dev/disk2     1.0Gi  125Mi  875Mi    13%     32014    223984   13%   /Volumes/Google Earth

I would expect to see /home as well (at a minimum).

4
  • /home is there right in the middle, would only show up if /home is mounted from another device though, obviously..
    – Karthik T
    Jan 21, 2013 at 0:08
  • I know it is. But File.listRoots() doesn't return /home. That's the point.
    – Andrew
    Jan 21, 2013 at 0:09
  • Is it supposed to? / is the only true root of a unix filesystem. Maybe it is better if you say what you are doing with this function?
    – Karthik T
    Jan 21, 2013 at 0:11
  • I understand that, but the list of mounted filesystems is different to the filesystem namespace.
    – Andrew
    Jan 21, 2013 at 0:15

6 Answers 6

18

In Java7+ you can use nio

import java.io.IOException;
import java.nio.file.FileStore;
import java.nio.file.FileSystems;

public class ListMountedVolumesWithNio {
   public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
      for (FileStore store : FileSystems.getDefault().getFileStores()) {
         long total = store.getTotalSpace() / 1024;
         long used = (store.getTotalSpace() - store.getUnallocatedSpace()) / 1024;
         long avail = store.getUsableSpace() / 1024;
         System.out.format("%-20s %12d %12d %12d%n", store, total, used, avail);
      }
   }
}
1
  • 4
    This is a great option! Unfortunately, there's no easy way to get from the FileStore to the Path/File. Parsing the toString() is a hackish workaround that may break... Jun 19, 2015 at 5:44
5

Java doesn't provide any access to mount points. You have to run system command mount via Runtime.exec() and parse its output. Either that, or parse the contents of /etc/mtab.

4
  • There's no /etc/mtab on my Mac OS X machine (Mountain Lion), but there is on my Ubuntu server.
    – Andrew
    Jan 21, 2013 at 0:41
  • 1
    OS X differs substantially from the "real" Unixes in many respects, so any OS-specific things such as this will likely have to be done differently for it. In any event, mount seems like a common tool that should work for Macs as well. I used df for similar task, which also works.
    – Cozzamara
    Jan 21, 2013 at 0:50
  • On OS X you can parse the contents of /Volumes using (new File("/Volumes")).listFiles(). One of the entries there is a symbolic link to / that you can test with getCanonicalPath(). You'll also have to test for and exclude files that aren't mount points, like the pesky .DS_Store. Jun 19, 2015 at 5:48
  • For java7+ take a look at Erik Martino answer
    – sergioFC
    Dec 26, 2019 at 15:52
4

You can try use follow method for resolve issue:

My code

public List<String> getHDDPartitions() {
    try {
        BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream("/proc/mounts"), "UTF-8"));
        String response;
        StringBuilder stringBuilder = new StringBuilder();
        while ((response = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
            stringBuilder.append(response.replaceAll(" +", "\t") + "\n");
        }
        bufferedReader.close();
        return Lists.newArrayList(Arrays.asList(stringBuilder.toString().split("\n")));
    } catch (IOException e) {
        LOGGER.error("{}", ExceptionWriter.INSTANCE.getStackTrace(e));
    }
    return null;
}

public List<Map<String, String>> getMapMounts() {
    List<Map<String, String>> resultList = Lists.newArrayList();
    for (String mountPoint : getHDDPartitions()) {
        Map<String, String> result = Maps.newHashMap();
        String[] mount = mountPoint.split("\t");
        result.put("FileSystem", mount[2]);
        result.put("MountPoint", mount[1]);
        result.put("Permissions", mount[3]);
        result.put("User", mount[4]);
        result.put("Group", mount[5]);
        result.put("Total", String.valueOf(new File(mount[1]).getTotalSpace()));
        result.put("Free", String.valueOf(new File(mount[1]).getFreeSpace()));
        result.put("Used", String.valueOf(new File(mount[1]).getTotalSpace() - new File(mount[1]).getFreeSpace()));
        result.put("Free Percent", String.valueOf(getFreeSpacePercent(new File(mount[1]).getTotalSpace(), new File(mount[1]).getFreeSpace())));
        resultList.add(result);
    }
    return resultList;
}

private Integer getFreeSpacePercent(long total, long free) {
    Double result = (Double.longBitsToDouble(free) / Double.longBitsToDouble(total)) * 100;
    return result.intValue();
}
1
  • This does the job well. I don't know why you don't have more up votes. Good job! Aug 23, 2018 at 16:23
4

OSHI (Operating System and Hardware Information library for Java) can be useful here: https://github.com/oshi/oshi.

Check out this code:

@Test
public void test() {

    final SystemInfo systemInfo = new SystemInfo();
    final OSFileStore[] fileStores = systemInfo.getOperatingSystem().getFileSystem().getFileStores();
    Stream.of(fileStores)
    .peek(fs ->{
        System.out.println("name: "+fs.getName());
        System.out.println("type: "+fs.getType() );
        System.out.println("str: "+fs.toString() );
        System.out.println("mount: "+fs.getMount());
        System.out.println("...");
    }).count();

}
1

You can call the getmntent function (use "man getmntent" to get more information) using JNA.

Here is some example code to get you started:

import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.List;

import com.sun.jna.Library;
import com.sun.jna.Native;
import com.sun.jna.Pointer;
import com.sun.jna.Structure;

public class MntPointTest {
    public static class mntent extends Structure {
        public String mnt_fsname; //Device or server for filesystem
        public String mnt_dir; //Directory mounted on
        public String mnt_type; //Type of filesystem: ufs, nfs, etc.
        public String mnt_opts;
        public int mnt_freq;
        public int mnt_passno;

        @Override
        protected List getFieldOrder() {
            return Arrays.asList("mnt_fsname", "mnt_dir", "mnt_type", "mnt_opts", "mnt_freq", "mnt_passno");
        }
    }

    public interface CLib extends Library {
        CLib INSTANCE = (CLib) Native.loadLibrary("c", CLib.class);

        Pointer setmntent(String file, String mode);
        mntent getmntent(Pointer stream);
        int endmntent(Pointer stream);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        mntent mntEnt;
        Pointer stream = CLib.INSTANCE.setmntent("/etc/mtab", "r");
        while ((mntEnt = CLib.INSTANCE.getmntent(stream)) != null) {
            System.out.println("Mounted from: " + mntEnt.mnt_fsname);
            System.out.println("Mounted on: " + mntEnt.mnt_dir);
            System.out.println("File system type: " + mntEnt.mnt_type);
            System.out.println("-------------------------------");
        }

        CLib.INSTANCE.endmntent(stream);
    }
}
2
  • thanks for this great answer! do you perhaps know if there is a project or library that maps all common methods to java (i mean like mount/umount and friends)?
    – shlomi33
    Nov 13, 2014 at 7:16
  • I'm working on a project at github.com/dblock/oshi that does this sort of JNA-based mapping of key operating system native code (memory, files, cpu, battery, etc.). Jun 19, 2015 at 5:52
0

I was already on the way to using mount when @Cozzamara pointed out that's the way to go. What I ended up with is:

    // get the list of mounted filesystems
    // Note: this is Unix specific, as it requires the "mount" command
    Process mountProcess = Runtime.getRuntime ().exec ( "mount" );
    BufferedReader mountOutput = new BufferedReader ( new InputStreamReader ( mountProcess.getInputStream () ) );
    List<File> roots = new ArrayList<File> ();
    while ( true ) {

        // fetch the next line of output from the "mount" command
        String line = mountOutput.readLine ();
        if ( line == null )
            break;

        // the line will be formatted as "... on <filesystem> (...)"; get the substring we need
        int indexStart = line.indexOf ( " on /" );
        int indexEnd = line.indexOf ( " ", indexStart );
        roots.add ( new File ( line.substring ( indexStart + 4, indexEnd - 1 ) ) );
    }
    mountOutput.close ();
1
  • Should this line: roots.add ( new File ( line.substring ( indexStart + 4, indexEnd - 1 ) ) ); be: roots.add ( new File ( line.substring ( indexStart + 4, indexEnd) ) );?
    – Andy King
    Jan 31, 2014 at 18:46

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