255

I am trying to make a scatter plot and annotate data points with different numbers from a list. So, for example, I want to plot y vs x and annotate with corresponding numbers from n.

y = [2.56422, 3.77284, 3.52623, 3.51468, 3.02199]
z = [0.15, 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75]
n = [58, 651, 393, 203, 123]
ax = fig.add_subplot(111)
ax1.scatter(z, y, fmt='o')

Any ideas?

471

I'm not aware of any plotting method which takes arrays or lists but you could use annotate() while iterating over the values in n.

y = [2.56422, 3.77284, 3.52623, 3.51468, 3.02199]
z = [0.15, 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75]
n = [58, 651, 393, 203, 123]

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.scatter(z, y)

for i, txt in enumerate(n):
    ax.annotate(txt, (z[i], y[i]))

There are a lot of formatting options for annotate(), see the matplotlib website:

enter image description here

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  • 1
    Works well on top of Seaborn regplots without too much disruption, too. – ijoseph Dec 9 '16 at 1:14
  • @Rutger I use a pandas datframe and I somehow get a KeyError- so I guess a dict() object is expected? Is there any other way to label the data using enumerate, annotate and a pandas data frame? – Rachel Jan 4 '17 at 18:04
  • @Rachel, You can use for row in df.iterrows():, and then access the values with row['text'], row['x-coord'] etc. If you post a separate question i'll have a look at it. – Rutger Kassies Jan 5 '17 at 8:11
  • @RutgerKassies Thanks, Rutger! I posted a question here stackoverflow.com/questions/41481153/… I fear that it may be to similar to this very question. But I can't work it out somehow. Thank you for your help! – Rachel Jan 5 '17 at 9:20
  • 1
    @aviator, not built-in unfortunately. But see for example this using networkx's layout engine: stackoverflow.com/a/34697108/1755432 – Rutger Kassies May 7 at 8:36
33

In version's earlier than matplotlib 2.0, ax.scatter is not necessary to plot text without markers. In version 2.0 you'll need ax.scatter to set the proper range and markers for text.

y = [2.56422, 3.77284, 3.52623, 3.51468, 3.02199]
z = [0.15, 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75]
n = [58, 651, 393, 203, 123]

fig, ax = plt.subplots()

for i, txt in enumerate(n):
    ax.annotate(txt, (z[i], y[i]))

And in this link you can find an example in 3d.

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  • This is awesome! Thanks for sharing this solution. Can you also share what the proper code is to set the size of the figure? Implementations such as plt.figure(figsize=(20,10)) aren't working as expected, in that that invoking this code doesn't actually change the size of the image. Looking forward to your assistance. Thanks! – Levine Jan 24 '18 at 21:45
  • fig, ax = plt.subplots(figsize=(20,10)) – rafaelvalle Jan 25 '18 at 1:47
21

In case anyone is trying to apply the above solutions to a .scatter() instead of a .subplot(),

I tried running the following code

y = [2.56422, 3.77284, 3.52623, 3.51468, 3.02199]
z = [0.15, 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75]
n = [58, 651, 393, 203, 123]

fig, ax = plt.scatter(z, y)

for i, txt in enumerate(n):
    ax.annotate(txt, (z[i], y[i]))

But ran into errors stating "cannot unpack non-iterable PathCollection object", with the error specifically pointing at codeline fig, ax = plt.scatter(z, y)

I eventually solved the error using the following code

plt.scatter(z, y)

for i, txt in enumerate(n):
    plt.annotate(txt, (z[i], y[i]))

I didn't expect there to be a difference between .scatter() and .subplot() I should have known better.

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12

You may also use pyplot.text (see here).

def plot_embeddings(M_reduced, word2Ind, words):
""" Plot in a scatterplot the embeddings of the words specified in the list "words".
    Include a label next to each point.
"""
for word in words:
    x, y = M_reduced[word2Ind[word]]
    plt.scatter(x, y, marker='x', color='red')
    plt.text(x+.03, y+.03, word, fontsize=9)
plt.show()

M_reduced_plot_test = np.array([[1, 1], [-1, -1], [1, -1], [-1, 1], [0, 0]])
word2Ind_plot_test = {'test1': 0, 'test2': 1, 'test3': 2, 'test4': 3, 'test5': 4}
words = ['test1', 'test2', 'test3', 'test4', 'test5']
plot_embeddings(M_reduced_plot_test, word2Ind_plot_test, words)

enter image description here

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7

Python 3.6+:

coordinates = [('a',1,2), ('b',3,4), ('c',5,6)]
for x in coordinates: plt.annotate(x[0], (x[1], x[2]))
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2

As a one liner using list comprehension and numpy:

[ax.annotate(x[0], (x[1], x[2])) for x in np.array([n,z,y]).T]

setup is ditto to Rutger's answer.

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1

I would love to add that you can even use arrows /text boxes to annotate the labels. Here is what I mean:

import random
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt


y = [2.56422, 3.77284, 3.52623, 3.51468, 3.02199]
z = [0.15, 0.3, 0.45, 0.6, 0.75]
n = [58, 651, 393, 203, 123]

fig, ax = plt.subplots()
ax.scatter(z, y)

ax.annotate(n[0], (z[0], y[0]), xytext=(z[0]+0.05, y[0]+0.3), 
    arrowprops=dict(facecolor='red', shrink=0.05))

ax.annotate(n[1], (z[1], y[1]), xytext=(z[1]-0.05, y[1]-0.3), 
    arrowprops = dict(  arrowstyle="->",
                        connectionstyle="angle3,angleA=0,angleB=-90"))

ax.annotate(n[2], (z[2], y[2]), xytext=(z[2]-0.05, y[2]-0.3), 
    arrowprops = dict(arrowstyle="wedge,tail_width=0.5", alpha=0.1))

ax.annotate(n[3], (z[3], y[3]), xytext=(z[3]+0.05, y[3]-0.2), 
    arrowprops = dict(arrowstyle="fancy"))

ax.annotate(n[4], (z[4], y[4]), xytext=(z[4]-0.1, y[4]-0.2),
    bbox=dict(boxstyle="round", alpha=0.1), 
    arrowprops = dict(arrowstyle="simple"))

plt.show()

Which will generate the following graph: enter image description here

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1

For limited set of values matplotlib is fine. But when you have lots of values the tooltip starts to overlap over other data points. But with limited space you can't ignore the values. Hence it's better to zoom out or zoom in.

Using plotly

import plotly.express as px
df = px.data.tips()

df = px.data.gapminder().query("year==2007 and continent=='Americas'")


fig = px.scatter(df, x="gdpPercap", y="lifeExp", text="country", log_x=True, size_max=100, color="lifeExp")
fig.update_traces(textposition='top center')
fig.update_layout(title_text='Life Expectency', title_x=0.5)
fig.show()

enter image description here

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