22

I have long file I need to parse. Because it's very long I need to do it chunk by chunk. I tried this:

function parseFile(file){
    var chunkSize = 2000;
    var fileSize = (file.size - 1);

    var foo = function(e){
        console.log(e.target.result);
    };

    for(var i =0; i < fileSize; i += chunkSize)
    {
        (function( fil, start ) {
            var reader = new FileReader();
            var blob = fil.slice(start, chunkSize + 1);
            reader.onload = foo;
            reader.readAsText(blob);
        })( file, i );
    }
}

After running it I see only the first chunk in the console. If I change 'console.log' to jquery append to some div I see only first chunk in that div. What about other chunks? How to make it work?

46

FileReader API is asynchronous so you should handle it with block calls. A for loop wouldn't do the trick since it wouldn't wait for each read to complete before reading the next chunk. Here's a working approach.

function parseFile(file, callback) {
    var fileSize   = file.size;
    var chunkSize  = 64 * 1024; // bytes
    var offset     = 0;
    var self       = this; // we need a reference to the current object
    var chunkReaderBlock = null;

    var readEventHandler = function(evt) {
        if (evt.target.error == null) {
            offset += evt.target.result.length;
            callback(evt.target.result); // callback for handling read chunk
        } else {
            console.log("Read error: " + evt.target.error);
            return;
        }
        if (offset >= fileSize) {
            console.log("Done reading file");
            return;
        }

        // of to the next chunk
        chunkReaderBlock(offset, chunkSize, file);
    }

    chunkReaderBlock = function(_offset, length, _file) {
        var r = new FileReader();
        var blob = _file.slice(_offset, length + _offset);
        r.onload = readEventHandler;
        r.readAsText(blob);
    }

    // now let's start the read with the first block
    chunkReaderBlock(offset, chunkSize, file);
}
  • 2
    This is brilliant. Reading huge 3GB+ files without issue. The small chunk size makes it a bit slow though. – bryc Feb 15 '15 at 5:54
  • Wrote a CRC32 calculator using this for fun using web workers/dragndrop. jsfiddle.net/9xzf8qqj – bryc Feb 15 '15 at 6:23
  • 2
    Worked for me as well for large files. However, for larger files (>9GB), I found out incrementing offset by evt.target.result.length was corrupting my file! My quick solution was to increment it by chunkSize instead. I'm not sure if it's a FS issue (I'm on Ubuntu) or something else, but it works just fine for any filesize if you offset += chunkSize. – user40171 May 11 '15 at 5:41
  • I kind of improved it here: gist.github.com/alediaferia/cfb3a7503039f9278381 I didn't test it though, so if you notice glitches please let me know. – alediaferia Jun 22 '15 at 10:52
  • 1
    according to the docs, onload is only called if there is no error. Use onloadend otherwise. I would however recommend using onload and onerror.In short: the code above is never catching any error. – Flavien Volken Apr 14 '18 at 15:00
6

The second argument of slice is actually the end byte. Your code should look something like:

 function parseFile(file){
    var chunkSize = 2000;
    var fileSize = (file.size - 1);

    var foo = function(e){
        console.log(e.target.result);
    };

    for(var i =0; i < fileSize; i += chunkSize) {
        (function( fil, start ) {
            var reader = new FileReader();
            var blob = fil.slice(start, chunkSize + start);
            reader.onload = foo;
            reader.readAsText(blob);
        })(file, i);
    }
}

Or you can use this BlobReader for easier interface:

BlobReader(blob)
.readText(function (text) {
  console.log('The text in the blob is', text);
});

More information:

  • Is the loop reliable? I'm rather new to FileReader API but I see it is asynchronous. How can we make sure the whole file has been processed completely once the for loop ends? – alediaferia Jan 31 '15 at 19:22
3

Revamped @alediaferia answer in a class (typescript version here) and returning the result in a promise. Brave coders would even have wrapped it into an async iterator

class FileStreamer {
    constructor(file) {
        this.file = file;
        this.offset = 0;
        this.defaultChunkSize = 64 * 1024; // bytes
        this.rewind();
    }
    rewind() {
        this.offset = 0;
    }
    isEndOfFile() {
        return this.offset >= this.getFileSize();
    }
    readBlockAsText(length = this.defaultChunkSize) {
        const fileReader = new FileReader();
        const blob = this.file.slice(this.offset, this.offset + length);
        return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
            fileReader.onloadend = (event) => {
                const target = (event.target);
                if (target.error == null) {
                    const result = target.result;
                    this.offset += result.length;
                    this.testEndOfFile();
                    resolve(result);
                }
                else {
                    reject(target.error);
                }
            };
            fileReader.readAsText(blob);
        });
    }
    testEndOfFile() {
        if (this.isEndOfFile()) {
            console.log('Done reading file');
        }
    }
    getFileSize() {
        return this.file.size;
    }
}

Example printing a whole file in the console (within an async context)

const fileStreamer = new FileStreamer(aFile);
while (!fileStreamer.isEndOfFile()) {
  const data = await fileStreamer.readBlockAsText();
  console.log(data);
}
  • Thanks, very handy. Did you test it? Any corrections? – Leo Apr 30 '18 at 15:09
  • 1
    @Leo I am using it in one of my projects and yes it's working fine. Note that all those answer might be deprecated sooner or later by Streams API. One thing I could improve would be to add the ability to pass an optional encoding parameter to the fileReader.readAsText function – Flavien Volken May 1 '18 at 14:47
  • Thanks @Flavien. And thanks for the pointer to Streams API. – Leo May 1 '18 at 22:28
  • Hm, I am going to use it for binary files. Can I just replace readAsText with readAsArrayBuffer? Or is it safe to use UTF-8 for reading (and output)? – Leo May 1 '18 at 23:40
  • 1
    Yes you can use readAsArrayBuffer, or just take my ts version here – Flavien Volken May 2 '18 at 6:01
3

You can take advantage of Response (part of fetch) to convert most things to anything else blob, text, json and also get a ReadableStream that can help you read the blob in chunks 👍

var dest = new WritableStream({
  write (str) {
    console.log(str)
  }
})

new Response(new Blob(['bloby']))
  .body
  // Decode the binary-encoded response to string
  .pipeThrough(new TextDecoderStream())
  .pipeTo(dest)
  .then(() => {
    console.log('done')
  })

Old answer (WritableStreams pipeTo and pipeThrough was not implemented before)

I came up with a interesting idéa that is probably very fast since it will convert the blob to a ReadableByteStreamReader probably much easier too since you don't need to handle stuff like chunk size and offset and then doing it all recursive in a loop

function streamBlob(blob) {
  const reader = new Response(blob).body.getReader()
  const pump = reader => reader.read()
  .then(({ value, done }) => {
    if (done) return
    // uint8array chunk (use TextDecoder to read as text)
    console.log(value)
    return pump(reader)
  })
  return pump(reader)
}

streamBlob(new Blob(['bloby'])).then(() => {
  console.log('done')
})

1

Parsing the large file into small chunk by using the simple method:

                //Parse large file in to small chunks
                var parseFile = function (file) {

                        var chunkSize = 1024 * 1024 * 16; //16MB Chunk size
                        var fileSize = file.size;
                        var currentChunk = 1;
                        var totalChunks = Math.ceil((fileSize/chunkSize), chunkSize);

                        while (currentChunk <= scope.totalChunks) {

                            var offset = (currentChunk-1) * chunkSize;
                            var currentFilePart = file.slice(offset, (offset+chunkSize));

                            console.log('Current chunk number is ', currentChunk);
                            console.log('Current chunk data', currentFilePart);

                            currentChunk++;
                        }
                };

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