170

I have gotten the following to work:

for i in {2..10}
do
    echo "output: $i"
done

It produces a bunch of lines of output: 2, output: 3, so on.

However, trying to run the following:

max=10
for i in {2..$max}
do
    echo "$i"
done

produces the following:

output: {2..10}

How can I get the compiler to realize it should treat $max as the other end of the array, and not part of a string?

  • 2
    what system and shell are you using? What kind of goofy system has sh or bash, but doesn't have seq, a coreutil? – whatsisname Sep 18 '09 at 16:08
  • 11
    FreeBSD doesn't. – Nietzche-jou Sep 18 '09 at 16:12
  • echo "$i should be echo "$i" -- won't fix the problem, though. – Dave Jarvis Sep 18 '09 at 16:19
  • Small style nit: I usually see the do and then keywords on the same line as for and if, respectively. E.g., for i in {2..10}; do – a paid nerd Sep 18 '09 at 16:33
  • possible duplicate of Is it possible to use a variable in for syntax in bash? – Barmar Aug 1 '13 at 15:00

11 Answers 11

208

Brace expansion, {x..y} is performed before other expansions, so you cannot use that for variable length sequences.

Instead, use the seq 2 $max method as user mob stated.

So, for your example it would be:

max=10
for i in `seq 2 $max`
do
    echo "$i"
done
  • There is no good reason to use an external command such as seq to count and increment numbers in the for loop, hence it is recommend that you avoid using seq. This command is left for compatibility with old bash. The built-in commands are fast enough. for (( EXP1; EXP2; EXP3 )) ... – miller Jul 25 '16 at 9:27
  • 10
    @miller the for (( ... )) syntax isn't POSIX and that means for example that it won't work out of the box on things like Alpine Linux. seq does. – Wernight Sep 30 '16 at 22:21
  • @Wernight Not just Alpine Linux; #!/bin/sh is Dash in Debian/Ubuntu. – Franklin Yu Mar 12 at 20:50
66

Try the arithmetic-expression version of for:

max=10
for (( i=2; i <= $max; ++i ))
do
    echo "$i"
done

This is available in most versions of bash, and should be Bourne shell (sh) compatible also.

  • 18
    Good answer, but this doesn't work with #!/bin/sh. – Flow Mar 22 '12 at 14:44
  • 1
    @Flow: Hm, I just tried it on a couple of systems (Linux and BSD based) with #!/bin/sh and it worked fine. Invoked under bash and specifically under /bin/sh, still worked. Maybe the version of sh matters? Are you on some old Unix? – system PAUSE Mar 26 '12 at 21:29
  • AFAIK QNX 6.3.0 – Flow Mar 27 '12 at 7:20
  • 8
    Very few systems have a dedicated sh, instead making it a link to other another shell. Ideally, such a shell invoked as sh would only support those features in the POSIX standard, but by default let some of their extra features through. The C-style for-loop is not a POSIX feature, but may be in sh mode by the actual shell. – chepner Sep 12 '13 at 19:41
  • This is the best answer for someone looking to do the job.+1 – gsamaras Jul 11 '15 at 16:40
27

Step the loop manually:

i=0
max=10
while [ $i -lt $max ]
do
    echo "output: $i"
    true $(( i++ ))
done

If you don’t have to be totally POSIX, you can use the arithmetic for loop:

max=10
for (( i=0; i < max; i++ )); do echo "output: $i"; done

Or use jot(1) on BSD systems:

for i in $( jot 0 10 ); do echo "output: $i"; done
9

There's more than one way to do it.

max=10
for i in `eval "echo {2..$max}"`
do
    echo "$i"
done
  • 7
    A security risk, since eval will evaluate anything you set max to. Consider max="2}; echo ha; #", then replace echo ha with something more destructive. – chepner Sep 12 '13 at 19:45
  • 4
    (S)he set max to 10. No risk. – Conrad Meyer Apr 21 '14 at 1:13
8

If the seq command available on your system:

for i in `seq 2 $max`
do
  echo "output: $i"
done

If not, then use poor man's seq with perl:

seq=`perl -e "\$,=' ';print 2..$max"`
for i in $seq
do
  echo "output: $i"
done

Watch those quote marks.

  • I just checked that; it doesn't seem that it is. – eykanal Sep 18 '09 at 16:02
4

This is a way:
Bash:

max=10
for i in $(bash -c "echo {2..${max}}"); do echo $i; done

The above Bash way will work for ksh and zsh too, when bash -c is replaced with ksh -c or zsh -c respectively.

Note: for i in {2..${max}}; do echo $i; done works in zsh and ksh.

3

We can iterate loop like as C programming.

#!/bin/bash
for ((i=1; i<=20; i=i+1))
do 
      echo $i
done
2

Here it worked on Mac OS X.

It includes the example of a BSD date, how to increment and decrement the date also:

for ((i=28; i>=6 ; i--));
do
    dat=`date -v-${i}d -j "+%Y%m%d"` 
    echo $dat
done
2

Well, as I didn't have the seq command installed on my system (Mac OS X v10.6.1 (Snow Leopard)), I ended up using a while loop instead:

max=5
i=1

while [ $max -gt $i ]
do
    (stuff)
done

*Shrugs* Whatever works.

  • 2
    seq is relatively new. I only found out about it a few months ago. But you can use a 'for' loop!! The disadvantage of a 'while' is that you have to remember to increment the counter somewhere inside the loop, or else loop downwards. – system PAUSE Sep 18 '09 at 16:23
1

These all do {1..8} and should all be POSIX. They also will not break if you put a conditional continue in the loop. The canonical way:

f=
while [ $((f+=1)) -le 8 ]
do
  echo $f
done

Another way:

g=
while
  g=${g}1
  [ ${#g} -le 8 ]
do
  echo ${#g}
done

and another:

set --
while
  set $* .
  [ ${#} -le 8 ]
do
  echo ${#}
done
1

Use:

max=10
for i in `eval echo {2..$max}`
do
    echo $i
done

You need the explicit 'eval' call to reevaluate the {} after variable substitution.

protected by Brad Larson Nov 1 '13 at 17:19

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