92

I have a PHP date in the form of 2013-01-22 and I want to get tomorrows date in the same format, so for example 2013-01-23.

How is this possible with PHP?

0

11 Answers 11

215

Use DateTime

$datetime = new DateTime('tomorrow');
echo $datetime->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

Or:

$datetime = new DateTime('2013-01-22');
$datetime->modify('+1 day');
echo $datetime->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

Or:

$datetime = new DateTime('2013-01-22');
$datetime->add(new DateInterval("P1D"));
echo $datetime->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

Or in PHP 5.4+:

echo (new DateTime('2013-01-22'))->add(new DateInterval("P1D"))
                                 ->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');
1
  • 1
    This uses current, I need to pass in a given date. – Justin Jan 22 '13 at 14:13
76
 $tomorrow = date("Y-m-d", strtotime('tomorrow'));

or

  $tomorrow = date("Y-m-d", strtotime("+1 day"));

Help Link: STRTOTIME()

1
  • 1
    I used this one and of all answers is the shortest and simplest version, thanks ! – Bombelman May 6 '20 at 3:23
17

Since you tagged this with , you can use it with the +1 day modifier like so:

$tomorrow_timestamp = strtotime('+1 day', strtotime('2013-01-22'));

That said, it's a much better solution to use DateTime.

15
<? php 

//1 Day = 24*60*60 = 86400

echo date("d-m-Y", time()+86400); 

?>
2
  • 17
    Note that this will fail in edge cases (daylight savings time). – JJJ Jul 6 '14 at 17:01
  • This answer is wrong. I have a cronjob use this in a loop, and the system got died. – jewelnguyen8 Nov 7 '19 at 8:40
5

echo date ('Y-m-d',strtotime('+1 day', strtotime($your_date)));

4

Use DateTime:

To get tomorrow from now :

$d = new DateTime('+1day');
$tomorrow = $d->format('d/m/Y h.i.s');
echo $tomorrow;

Results : 28/06/2017 08.13.20

To get tomorrow from a date :

$d = new DateTime('2017/06/10 08.16.35 +1day')
$tomorrow = $d->format('d/m/Y h.i.s');
echo $tomorrow;

Results : 11/06/2017 08.16.35

Hope it helps!

1
/**
 * get tomorrow's date in the format requested, default to Y-m-d for MySQL (e.g. 2013-01-04)
 *
 * @param string
 *
 * @return string
 */
public static function getTomorrowsDate($format = 'Y-m-d')
{
    $date = new DateTime();
    $date->add(DateInterval::createFromDateString('tomorrow'));

    return $date->format($format);
}
1

By strange it can seem it works perfectly fine: date_create( '2016-02-01 + 1 day' );

echo date_create( $your_date . ' + 1 day' )->format( 'Y-m-d' );

Should do it

0

First, coming up with correct abstractions is always a key. key to readability, maintainability, and extendability.

Here, quite obvious candidate is an ISO8601DateTime. There are at least two implementations: first one is a parsed datetime from a string, and the second one is tomorrow. Hence, there are two classes that can be used, and their combination results in (almost) desired outcome:

new Tomorrow(new FromISO8601('2013-01-22'));

Both objects are an ISO8601 datetime, so their textual representation is not exactly what you need. So the final stroke is to make them take a date-form:

new Date(
    new Tomorrow(
        new FromISO8601('2013-01-22')
    )
);

Since you need a textual representation, not just an object, you invoke a value() method.

For more about this approach, take a look at this post.

-1

here's working function

function plus_one_day($date){
 $date2 = formatDate4db($date);
 $date1 = str_replace('-', '/', $date2);
 $tomorrow = date('Y-m-d',strtotime($date1 . "+1 days"));
 return $tomorrow; }
2
  • what does the formatDate4db function do? Why replace the dashes with slashes in the string? – braindigitalis Aug 12 '19 at 13:33
  • formatDate4db function pass the date and it make a format like database mysql format , and str_replace function , i have date format 2019/12/10 and replace with - – Muhammad Awais Zulifqar Dec 19 '19 at 14:03
-4
$date = '2013-01-22';
$time = strtotime($date) + 86400;
echo date('Y-m-d', $time);

Where 86400 is the # of seconds in a day.

5
  • 11
    No, one day doesn't always have 86400 seconds. – nickb Jan 22 '13 at 14:15
  • I don't get the problem. Please explain @nickb – Aiyion.Prime Dec 5 '15 at 21:35
  • @Aiyion.Prime days that make the switch to or from daylight saving time do not have 86400 seconds – dumazy Dec 7 '15 at 10:07
  • I thought of that, DST is initiated at two o'clock and should therefore never result in a different date? – Aiyion.Prime Dec 7 '15 at 18:19
  • The problem isn't daylight savings. Times in a database really should be stored as UTC which has no daylight saving time. If you're storing your dates in UTC this will work fine but is a bit obtuse. – braindigitalis Dec 31 '19 at 20:12

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