10

I want to process each line of a file on a hard-disk now. Is it better to load a file as a whole and then split on basis of newline character (using boost), or is it better to use getline()? My question is does getline() reads single line when called (resulting in multiple hard disk access) or reads whole file and gives line by line?

  • If you are worried about I/O times, then this is how Google does it: The generated files they analyze are up to several gigabytes or more. In such circumstances it is impossible to sequentially read such large files in an acceptable times, so the files are divided into smaller parts (typically 64 MB) and are read in parallel. – SChepurin Jan 22 '13 at 19:35
6

getline will call read() as a system call somewhere deep in the gutst of the C library. Exactly how many times it is called, and how it is called depends on the C library design. But most likely there is no distinct difference in reading a line at a time vs. the whole file, becuse the OS at the bottom layer will read (at least) one disk-block at a time, and most likely at least a "page" (4KB), if not more.

Further, unles you do nearly nothing with your string after you have read it (e.g you are writing something like "grep", so mostly just reading the to find a string), it is unlikely that the overhead of reading a line at a time is a large part of the time you spend.

But the "load the whole file in one go" has several, distinct, problems:

  1. You don't start processing until you have read the whole file.
  2. You need enough memory to read the entire file into memory - what if the file is a few hundred GB in size? Does your program fail then?

Don't try to optimise something unless you have used profiling to prove that it's part of why your code is running slow. You are just causing more problems for yourself.

Edit: So, I wrote a program to measure this, since I think it's quite interesting.

And the results are definitely interesting - to make the comparison fair, I created three large files of 1297984192 bytes each (by copying all source files in a directory with about a dozen different source files, then copying this file several times over to "multiply" it, until it took over 1.5 seconds to run the test, which is how long I think you need to run things to make sure the timing isn't too susceptible to random "network packet came in" or some other outside influences taking time out of the process).

I also decided to measure the system and user-time by the process.

$ ./bigfile
Lines=24812608
Wallclock time for mmap is 1.98 (user:1.83 system: 0.14)
Lines=24812608
Wallclock time for getline is 2.07 (user:1.68 system: 0.389)
Lines=24812608
Wallclock time for readwhole is 2.52 (user:1.79 system: 0.723)
$ ./bigfile
Lines=24812608
Wallclock time for mmap is 1.96 (user:1.83 system: 0.12)
Lines=24812608
Wallclock time for getline is 2.07 (user:1.67 system: 0.392)
Lines=24812608
Wallclock time for readwhole is 2.48 (user:1.76 system: 0.707)

Here's the three different functions to read the file (there's some code to measure time and stuff too, of course, but for reducing the size of this post, I choose to not post all of that - and I played around with ordering to see if that made any difference, so results above are not in the same order as the functions here)

void func_readwhole(const char *name)
{
    string fullname = string("bigfile_") + name;
    ifstream f(fullname.c_str());

    if (!f) 
    {
        cerr << "could not open file for " << fullname << endl;
        exit(1);
    }

    f.seekg(0, ios::end);
    streampos size = f.tellg();

    f.seekg(0, ios::beg);

    char* buffer = new char[size];
    f.read(buffer, size);
    if (f.gcount() != size)
    {
        cerr << "Read failed ...\n";
        exit(1);
    }

    stringstream ss;
    ss.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(buffer, size);

    int lines = 0;
    string str;
    while(getline(ss, str))
    {
        lines++;
    }

    f.close();


    cout << "Lines=" << lines << endl;

    delete [] buffer;
}

void func_getline(const char *name)
{
    string fullname = string("bigfile_") + name;
    ifstream f(fullname.c_str());

    if (!f) 
    {
        cerr << "could not open file for " << fullname << endl;
        exit(1);
    }

    string str;
    int lines = 0;

    while(getline(f, str))
    {
        lines++;
    }

    cout << "Lines=" << lines << endl;

    f.close();
}

void func_mmap(const char *name)
{
    char *buffer;

    string fullname = string("bigfile_") + name;
    int f = open(fullname.c_str(), O_RDONLY);

    off_t size = lseek(f, 0, SEEK_END);

    lseek(f, 0, SEEK_SET);

    buffer = (char *)mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ, MAP_PRIVATE, f, 0);


    stringstream ss;
    ss.rdbuf()->pubsetbuf(buffer, size);

    int lines = 0;
    string str;
    while(getline(ss, str))
    {
        lines++;
    }

    munmap(buffer, size);
    cout << "Lines=" << lines << endl;
}
  • 1
    I/O reads is the number of requests to read a file. Surely you don't expect the NUMBER of calls to a function to (much) affect the actual time something takes, if what happens INSIDE the function takes significantly longer than the call. This is tested on Linux, of course, Windows may vary - since I only have Windows as a virtual machine, I don't think it's fair to compare. Did you actually measure the TIME it takes? – Mats Petersson Jan 22 '13 at 19:07
  • Unless of course, you have to somehow "pay per I/O request", but you're not running on a rented machine that has such a daft policy, do you? – Mats Petersson Jan 22 '13 at 19:08
  • @SChepurin when large scale processing done on Quadcore PCs not on distributed servers for some interesting things performance gain of some miliseconds and some read write operations do matter :) So was my question – psyche Jan 22 '13 at 19:15
  • 1
    So, did you actually MEASURE the difference in time, rather than number of I/O requests. I'm sure if I measure the number of I/O requests, my slowest version will be the lowest number of I/O requests - this is because you get no overlap between the reading teh file and issuing the next read-request, like you do when reading files in little bits. – Mats Petersson Jan 22 '13 at 19:17
  • in your readwhole method the programme may wait untill it completes the fetch . whereas in read line it will not stop but generate the request for i/o untill it reaches the end.in your case i will prefer the read line method with more chunk at a time.because read time of first one is much more then the cpu switching time. – Arpit Jan 22 '13 at 19:23
3

The OS will read a whole block of data (depending on how the disk is formatted, typically 4-8k at a time) and do some of the buffering for you. Let the OS take care of it for you, and read the data in the way that makes sense for your program.

  • I want to process whole file my question was regarding speed which technique is faster basically. – psyche Jan 22 '13 at 16:28
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    You won't be able to tell the difference in speed. The operating system is very good at caching / buffering. As long as you are not alternating access between two different files, you'll be fine. If you don't believe me - try it for yourself. – Floris Jan 22 '13 at 16:31
  • Actually no. of hardrive access is somewhat worrying for me I have already written code on getline basis but if there are very high no of reads hardrive will get damaged sooner so my question is that will there be any difference in no. of hard-drive reads by other technique? or it is same thing at the back at hardware level. – psyche Jan 22 '13 at 16:36
  • 3
    Every block of data will be read once. Unless you are accessing another file at the same time, there will be minimal difference - modern hardware has a lot of caching to improve the access speed. Typically it will read a whole revolution of the disk "just in case you need these other blocks". Hard drives are pretty robust. Just go with what you have. – Floris Jan 22 '13 at 16:46
  • 1
    When task manager talks about "reads", it is calls you made to the OS - so when you ask to read the entire file as one block, it will count as one "read". It doesn't reflect what happens on the disk drive itself. If I understand what you said correctly, the getline() method ends up being faster. That makes sense - see @Arne Mertz comments below. With getline() there isn't all this copying going on - and as I said, at the disk drive level things are pretty optimized regardless of how you read the data. Can we agree that you have the answer you were looking for? – Floris Jan 22 '13 at 19:00
2

The fstreams are buffered reasonably. The underlying acesses to the harddisk by the OS are buffered reasonably. The hard disk itself has a reasonable buffer. You most surely will not trigger more hard disk accesses if you read the file line by line. Or character by character, for that matter.

So there is no reason to load the whole file into a big buffer and work on that buffer, because it already is in a buffer. And there often is no reason to buffer one line at a time, either. Why allocate memory to buffer something in a string that is already buffered in the ifstream? If you can, work on the stream directly, don't bother tossing everything around twice or more from one buffer to the next. Unless it supports readability and/or your profiler told you that disc access is slowing your program down significantly.

  • 1
    +1 for making clear that there is already plenty of buffering going on, and there's no reason to add more. And for basically agreeing with me. :-) – Floris Jan 22 '13 at 16:53
  • 1
    It can be faster if he mmaps the file, then uses a custom string class based on iterator pairs to represent the string, without moving any data. It's a lot more effort, however, and I wouldn't bother unless it were really, really necessary. – James Kanze Jan 22 '13 at 16:56
  • Yes, my benchmarks show mmap is faster than the alternatives. – Mats Petersson Jan 22 '13 at 20:10
0

If it's a small file on disk, it's probably more efficient to read the entire file and parse it line by line vs. reading one line at a time--that would take lot's of disk access.

  • At that size, you obviously don't want to read the entire file into memory (and it could very well be spread across the disk). I'd go with Floris recommendation an pick what works best for your code, let the OS optimize disk access for you. – Ray Jan 22 '13 at 16:31
  • 1
    @PragneshPatel All this is of course if you only are accessing it once. If your processing the file multiple times, it may very well be worth keeping it all in memory... – Ray Jan 22 '13 at 16:33
0

I believe the C++ idiom would be to read the file line-by-line, and create a line-based container as you read the file. Most likely the iostreams (getline) will be buffered enough that you won't notice a significant difference.

However for very large files you may get better performance by reading larger chunks of the file (not the whole file at once) and splitting internall as newlines are found.

If you want to know specifically which method is faster and by how much, you'll have to profile your code.

0

Its better to fetch the all data if it can be accommodated in memory because whenever you request the I/O your programmme looses the processing and put in a wait Q.

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However if the file size is big then it's better to read as much data at a time which is required in processing. Because bigger read operation will take much time to complete then the small ones. cpu process switching time is much smaller then this entire file read time.

  • Define "better"... whilst it is technically correct that there is less OVERHEAD, if you have to read, say, a 8GB text-file into a buffer, and then process it, it may take a lot longer [in total runtime] than it does to read chunks of a few hundred bytes and process each element. But it may also NOT be the case. It all depends on what you do in the processing, and how well the OS caches things. But I don't think we can conclusively say "it's better" to do one or the other. – Mats Petersson Jan 22 '13 at 16:35
  • actually i'm not considering these big files. as it is not clear from Question. – Arpit Jan 22 '13 at 16:38
  • its upto 2 GB not more than that. – psyche Jan 22 '13 at 16:40
  • Then use buffered read.Read the 4 lines at a time or much which suits you . – Arpit Jan 22 '13 at 16:41
  • I didn't try "four lines at a time", but see below for the results of reading a large file in various ways. Please explain how your method ("readwhole") is better? [Or explain how you would do it differently, if I have done it wrong - I'm not an expert on stringstream type work, so may have got that wrong] – Mats Petersson Jan 22 '13 at 18:52

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