4

I'm learning to work with fork(), and I have some questions.

Consider the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main()
{
   int i;

   for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
   {
      printf("%d", i);

      if((i%2)==0)
         if(fork())
            fork();
   }
}

When I output to a terminal, I get the result I expect (i.e.: 0,1,1,1,2,2,2,...). But when I output to a file, the result is completely different:

  • Case 1: (output to terminal, e.g.: ./a.out):

    Result is: 0,1,1,1,2,2,2,...

  • Case 2: (output to file, e.g.: ./a.out > output_file)

    Result is: 0,1,2,3,4,0,1,2,3,4,0,1,2,3,4,...

Why it is like this?

  • What do you mean with "completely different"? Do you understand multiprocessing, that multiple processes are working at the same time? – Emil Vikström Jan 22 '13 at 17:55
  • What is the different result? – imreal Jan 22 '13 at 17:55
  • We need more code. How are you writing to your file? What is the output that shows on the file? – Grambot Jan 22 '13 at 17:55
  • @TheCapn, I've added requested information to the questing text. – akmal Jan 22 '13 at 18:03
6
0

When you output to a file, the stdio library automatically block-buffers the outbound bits.

When a program calls exit(2) or returns from main(), any remaining buffered bits are flushed.

In a program like this that doesn't generate much output, all of the I/O will occur after the return from main(), when the destination is not a tty. This will often change the pattern and order of I/O operations all by itself.

In this case, the result is further complicated by the series of fork() calls. This will duplicate the partially filled and as-yet-unflushed I/O buffers in each child image.

Before a program calls fork(), one might first flush I/O using fflush(3). If this flush is not done, then you may want all processes except one (typically: the children) to _exit(2) instead of exit(3) or return from main(), to prevent the same bits from being output more than once. (_exit(2) just does the exit system call.)

| improve this answer | |
4
0

The fork() inside if block in your program is executed twice, because once fork is successful, the program is controlled by two processes(child and parent processes).So fork() inside if block, is executed by both child and parent processes. So it will have different output than expected since it is controlled by two different process and their order of execution is not known. ie. either child or parent may execute first after each fork()

For the difference in behaviour between the output and the file. this is the reason.

The contents you write to the buffer(to be written to file(disk) eventually) is not guaranteed to be written to the file (disk) immediatley. It is mostly flushed to the disk only after the execution of main() is complete. Whereas, it is output to terminal, during the execution of main().

Before writing to file in disk, the kernel actually copies the data into a buffer and later in the background, the kernel gathers up all of the dirty buffers, sorts them optimally and writes them out to file(disk).This is called writeback. It also allows the kernel to defer writes to more idle periods and batch many writes together.

To avoid such behaviour, it is always good to have three different condition checks in program using fork()

int pid;
if((pid = fork()) == -1 )
{ //fork unsuccessful 
 }
else if ( pid > 0)
{ //This is parent
 }
else
{//This is child
 }
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  • Can you please clarify how fork inside if executed twice. I think child will not execute fork it will receive result of fork, and starts execution from first statement after fork. – akmal Jan 22 '13 at 18:16
2
0

buffered streams can produce some strange results sometimes... especially when you have multiple processes using the same buffered stream. Force the buffer to be flushed and you'll see different results:

int main()
{
   int i;
   FILE * fd = fopen(yourfile, "w");
   for(i = 0; i < 5; i++)
   {
      fprintf(fd, "%d", i);
      fflush(fd);
      if((i%2)==0)
         if(fork())
            fork();
   }
}

Also, for your debugging purposes, it might be nice to dump the process' IDs so you can see which process spawns which, and have a better idea of what's going on. getpid() can help you with that.

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1
0

Why do I have different output between a terminal and a file when forking?

C standard library functions use internal buffering for speed up. Most implementations use fully buffered IO for file streams, line buffered for stdin/stdout and unbuffered for stderr.

So your problem can be solved in number of ways:

  1. Use explicit buffer flush before fork via fflush(3)
  2. Set buffer type manually via setvbuf(3)
  3. Use write(2) instead of stdlib's printf(3)
  4. Output to stderr by default via fprintf(3) *****
  5. Exit with _exit(2) in forked processes instead of exit(3) ******

Last two may not work as expected if:
* your implementation does not use unbuffered writes to stderr by default (Which is required by ISO C)
** you have written more than default buffer size in child and if was automatically flushed.

PS. Yet again, if you need deeper knowledge of standard library functions and buffering I recommend reading Advanced Programming in the UNIX Environment (2nd Edition) by W. Richard Stevens and Stephen A. Rago.

PPS. btw, your question is a very popular interview question for C/C++ programmer position.

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