47

I have the below example code, and I am interested to know how I can make this any cleaner, possibly through better use of SelectMany(). At this point the QuestionList property will not be null. All I want is a list of answerRows that are not null, but Questions can sometimes be null too.

IEnumerable<IQuestion> questions = survey.QuestionList
                    .Where(q => q.Questions != null)
                    .SelectMany(q => q.Questions);
            
if(questions == null)
return null;

IEnumerable<IAnswerRow> answerRows = questions
                    .Where(q => q.AnswerRows != null)
                    .SelectMany(q => q.AnswerRows);

if(answerRows == null)
return null;

I was interested by Jon's comment about Enumerable.SelectMany and Null.. so I wanted to try my example with some fake data to more easily see where the error is, please see the below, specifically how I am using SelectMany() on the result of a SelectMany(), its clearer to me now that the problem was having to make sure you don't use SelectMany() on a null reference, obvious when I actually read the NullReferenceException name :( and finally put things together.

Also while doing this, I realised that the use of try { } catch() { } in this example is useless and as usual Jon Skeet has the answer :) deferred execution..

so if you want to see the exception for row 2, comment out the relevant row 1 bits :P, sorry I couldn't figure out how to stop this error without re-writing the code example.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace SelectManyExample
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var questionGroupList1 = new List<QuestionGroup>() {
                new QuestionGroup() {
                    Questions = new List<Question>() {
                        new Question() {
                            AnswerRows = new List<AnswerRow>() {
                                new AnswerRow(),
                                new AnswerRow()
                            }
                        },

                        // empty question, causes cascading SelectMany to throw a NullReferenceException
                        null,

                        new Question() {
                            AnswerRows = new List<AnswerRow>() {
                                new AnswerRow() {
                                    Answers = new List<Answer>() {
                                        new Answer(),
                                        new Answer()
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            };

            var questionGroupList2 = new List<QuestionGroup>() {
                null,
                new QuestionGroup()
            };

            IEnumerable<AnswerRow> answerRows1 = null;
            IEnumerable<AnswerRow> answerRows2 = null;

            try
            {
                answerRows1 = questionGroupList1
                    .SelectMany(q => q.Questions)
                    .SelectMany(q => q.AnswerRows);
            }
            catch(Exception e) {
                Console.WriteLine("row 1 error = " + e.Message);
            }

            try
            {
                answerRows2 = questionGroupList2
                    .SelectMany(q => q.Questions)
                    .SelectMany(q => q.AnswerRows);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("row 2 error = " + e.Message);
            }


            Console.WriteLine("row 1: " + answerRows1.Count());
            Console.WriteLine("row 2: " + answerRows2.Count());
            Console.ReadLine();
        }


    }

    public class QuestionGroup {
        public IEnumerable<Question> Questions { get; set; }
    }

    public class Question {
        public IEnumerable<AnswerRow> AnswerRows { get; set; }
    }

    public class AnswerRow {
        public IEnumerable<Answer> Answers { get; set; }
    }

    public class Answer {
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }
}
17
  • 1
    Why do you think your collections would ever be null?
    – Kirk Woll
    Jan 22, 2013 at 22:23
  • 3
    questions and answerRows can never be null. And in a sane design, q.Questions and q.AnswerRows probably should never be null as well.
    – Jon
    Jan 22, 2013 at 22:25
  • 1
    @Jon Explain why they can never be null. If QuestionList is List<Type> of length 1, there's no reason I can think of stopping QuestionList[0] from being null. Similarly, 'Type' in the my example can still have property 'Questions' uninitialized. i.e. null. Jan 22, 2013 at 22:31
  • 1
    @flem They can never be null because that's how Where and SelectMany work. If the input is null they throw an exception, and if it's not null the result will either be a sequence of items, or an empty sequence. It will never be null. As a rule you should avoid null values for collections or sequences, just use an empty collection instead.
    – Servy
    Jan 22, 2013 at 22:32
  • 1
    @flem: questions is whatever Enumerable.SelectMany or Queryable.SelectMany decides to return. And that's guaranteed to be non-null.
    – Jon
    Jan 22, 2013 at 22:37

4 Answers 4

74
survey.QuestionList
    .Where(l => l.Questions != null)
    .SelectMany(l => l.Questions)
    .Where(q => q != null && q.AnswerRows != null)
    .SelectMany(q => q.AnswerRows);

I'd recommend you ensure your collections are never null. null can be a bit of a nuisance if you don't handle it well. You end up with if (something != null) {} all over your code. Then use:

survey.QuestionList
    .SelectMany(l => l.Questions)
    .SelectMany(q => q.AnswerRows);
3
  • I fully subscribed to this advice years back, but now with more modern features in C# we have the wonderful Null Coalesce & Null Check operators so this advice is definitely dated. These new'er null operators make working with nulls very concise as you can have : var thing = something?.isnull ?? ohNoItsNotBecauseWeHaveADefault; or even if (something?.isnull?.canIHaveABoolean() ?? false) Sep 30, 2023 at 5:28
  • @CajunCoding this answer is 10 years old after all. That said, I think the null coalescing operator may have already been around at that time. However, I don't believe that materially changes the answer. It's just a different way to handle the nulls, but the outcome is largely the same. Oct 2, 2023 at 17:29
  • 1
    Agreed. They both have valid use cases. But since the Null operators weren't highlighted as a viable option I thought it worthy of a comment (but not necessarily a separate answer)... since I stumbled across this even 10 years later 👍 Oct 3, 2023 at 19:22
23

A solution that complies with DRY would be to use the null-coalescing operator ?? in your SelectMany lambda expression.

IEnumerable<IQuestion> questions = survey.QuestionList.SelectMany(q => q.Questions ?? Enumerable.Empty<IQuestion>());

IEnumerable<IAnswerRow> answerRows = questions.SelectMany(q => q.AnswerRows ?? Enumerable.Empty<IAnswerRow>());

In both the OP's code and the above code, questions and answerRows will never be null, so the null checks are not required (you may wish to put .Any() checks depending on your business logic). But the above code will also never result in an exception if q.Questions or q.AnswerRows is null.

1
  • 1
    Precisely what I was searching for! Oct 13, 2023 at 14:13
13
public static IEnumerable<TResult> SelectNotNull<TSource, TResult>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, IEnumerable<TResult>> selector)
    where TResult : class
{
    return source.Select(selector)
        .Where(sequence => sequence != null)
        .SelectMany(x => x)
        .Where(item => item != null);
}

This then allows you to do the following:

var allAnswers = survey.QuestionList
    .SelectNotNull(list => list.Questions)
    .SelectNotNull(question => question.AnswerRows);
4
  • 1
    "where TResult : class" — is unnecessary limitation preventing usage of long and int sequences. Last "where" is also not needed, if necessary one can add it 'outside'.
    – greatvovan
    Aug 8, 2016 at 21:27
  • @greatvovan "one can add it outside" is not true because the extension method returns an IEnumerable<TResult> which has no possibilities to add (or remove)... Apr 18, 2017 at 13:02
  • 3
    @BernoulliIT greatvovan was referring to adding a call to the extension method to the end of a query on the calling side, not to adding items to sequences.
    – Servy
    Apr 18, 2017 at 13:13
  • SelectManyNotNull is more appropriate name, than SelectNotNull Sep 22, 2020 at 13:12
3

I'd like to use something short and reusable:

public static IEnumerable<T> OrEmpty<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
    return enumerable ?? Enumerable.Empty<T>();
}

And then in code it'll look like:

survey.QuestionList.SelectMany(q => q.Questions.OrEmpty())

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