40

I've searched for a while and been struggling to find this, I'm trying to generate several random, unique numbers is C#. I'm using System.Random, and I'm using a DateTime.Now.Ticks seed:

public Random a = new Random(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
private void NewNumber()
{
    MyNumber = a.Next(0, 10);
}

I'm calling NewNumber() regularly, but the problem is I often get repeated numbers. Some people suggested because I was declaring the random every time I did it, it would not produce a random number, so I put the declaration outside my function. Any suggestions or better ways than using System.Random ? Thank you

5
  • 2
  • As long as you are only creating the Random object once, you shouldn't have a problem. If you are wanting the numbers to be unique (haven't already had that number) then you'll need to add extra than just using Random
    – RoneRackal
    Jan 23, 2013 at 5:57
  • 2
    Are you looking for "permutation of numbers 1..10" instead of "random number in range 1..10"? (Definiitely give you 10 unique numbers in random sequence) Jan 23, 2013 at 6:00
  • 1
    why don't you generate guid? do you need int or any unique string is enough? Jan 23, 2013 at 6:00
  • 2
    What do you expect your code to produce after all ten unique values are produced? What should be 11th value (of 10)? Jan 23, 2013 at 6:02

18 Answers 18

32

I'm calling NewNumber() regularly, but the problem is I often get repeated numbers.

Random.Next doesn't guarantee the number to be unique. Also your range is from 0 to 10 and chances are you will get duplicate values. May be you can setup a list of int and insert random numbers in the list after checking if it doesn't contain the duplicate. Something like:

public Random a = new Random(); // replace from new Random(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
                                // Since similar code is done in default constructor internally
public List<int> randomList = new List<int>();
int MyNumber = 0;
private void NewNumber()
{
    MyNumber = a.Next(0, 10);
    if (!randomList.Contains(MyNumber))
        randomList.Add(MyNumber);
}
5
  • 3
    +1. Also for anything more than 10 list would be poor choice, HashSet would be better. And there is no need to initialize random this way - similar code done in default constructor anyway... Jan 23, 2013 at 6:02
  • 12
    Algorithmic complexity is bad. This should not be accepted as an answer. Dec 3, 2018 at 21:43
  • This is not a random list, you check for dublicates, but is real world duplicates may happen!!
    – Arsalan
    Mar 6, 2020 at 10:24
  • I think the solution will matter on the accepted range, and the amount of chosen numbers. If the amount of chosen numbers is high, then shuffling Enumerable.Range.ToArray() will work the best, whereas if you choose low amount of numbers from huge range, then HashSet makes sense.
    – Ferazhu
    Jun 10, 2021 at 7:00
  • 2
    really? this is a very bad algorithm. DO NOT USE IT! Nov 8, 2021 at 10:09
26

You might try shuffling an array of possible ints if your range is only 0 through 9. This adds the benefit of avoiding any conflicts in the number generation.

var nums = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ToArray();
var rnd = new Random();

// Shuffle the array
for (int i = 0;i < nums.Length;++i)
{
    int randomIndex = rnd.Next(nums.Length);
    int temp = nums[randomIndex];
    nums[randomIndex] = nums[i];
    nums[i] = temp;
}

// Now your array is randomized and you can simply print them in order
for (int i = 0;i < nums.Length;++i)
    Console.WriteLine(nums[i]);
6
  • I just tested that one out and it worked well too! thanks very much! Jan 23, 2013 at 6:13
  • Beware! That is an incorrect shuffle implementation! I'll post a correct implementation in a moment. Jan 23, 2013 at 9:03
  • (Too late to edit my comment above now). Please see my post below for a correct implementation, as well as a link to some discussion about it. Jan 23, 2013 at 9:13
  • Why not just Enumerable.Range(0, 10).OrderBy(x => rnd.NextDouble()).ToArray(); ? Nov 14, 2015 at 20:00
  • 3
    @thepirat000 The only real reason would be speed. For 10 elements it obviously doesn't make a difference, but it will for large collections.OrderBy() is likely an O(N log N) algorithm, where the shuffle is O(N).
    – itsme86
    Nov 15, 2015 at 1:59
15

NOTE, I dont recommend this :). Here's a "oneliner" as well:

var result = Enumerable.Range(0,9).OrderBy(g => Guid.NewGuid()).ToArray();
2
  • 1
    Like where you've gone here. But why not: Enumerable.Range(0, 9).OrderBy(g => rand.NextDouble()).ToList() then you get the Range as per question.
    – SDK
    Jan 15, 2016 at 15:28
  • 1
    If you want two unique numbers between 1 and 10,000,000 this will be extremely slow.
    – Rob
    Jan 16, 2017 at 4:54
11

I'm posting a correct implementation of a shuffle algorithm, since the other one posted here doesn't produce a uniform shuffle.

As the other answer states, for small numbers of values to be randomized, you can simply fill an array with those values, shuffle the array, and then use however many of the values that you want.

The following is an implementation of the Fisher-Yates Shuffle (aka the Knuth Shuffle). (Read the "implementation errors" section of that link (search for "always selecting j from the entire range of valid array indices on every iteration") to see some discussion about what is wrong with the other implementation posted here.)

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication2
{
    static class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Shuffler shuffler = new Shuffler();
            List<int> list = new List<int>{ 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
            shuffler.Shuffle(list);

            foreach (int value in list)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(value);
            }
        }
    }

    /// <summary>Used to shuffle collections.</summary>

    public class Shuffler
    {
        public Shuffler()
        {
            _rng = new Random();
        }

        /// <summary>Shuffles the specified array.</summary>
        /// <typeparam name="T">The type of the array elements.</typeparam>
        /// <param name="array">The array to shuffle.</param>

        public void Shuffle<T>(IList<T> array)
        {
            for (int n = array.Count; n > 1; )
            {
                int k = _rng.Next(n);
                --n;
                T temp = array[n];
                array[n] = array[k];
                array[k] = temp;
            }
        }

        private System.Random _rng;
    }
}
5
  • @downvoters: Did you investigate the problem with the other random shuffle? The answer in question is the one below the accepted answer. It is using an incorrect shuffle algorithm. Also see my comments to that answer. Jun 11, 2016 at 19:30
  • Why is this better than the other? (apar from that you made it generic) Apr 4, 2017 at 20:59
  • 1
    @Mitulátbáti Which answer do you mean by "the other"? If you mean "the accepted answer" then this one is better because it has complexity O(N) whereas the accepted answer has complexity O(N^2). Apr 5, 2017 at 12:10
  • 1
    Even you referred to it as "the other one" several times. I meant that one. Apr 10, 2017 at 21:31
  • @Mitulátbáti I specifically referred to the other shuffle algorithm, so assuming that is indeed what you mean then this answer is better than that one because this one produces a uniform shuffle - the other shuffle algorithm (there is only one other shuffle algorithm posted as an answer) has a bug and produces a non-uniform shuffle. Note that my answer here already provides a link to the Wikipedia article which has some details about why the other shuffle algorithm is broken. Apr 11, 2017 at 7:53
4

This is a unity only answer:

Check this ready-to-use method: Give in a range & count of number you want to get.

public static int[] getUniqueRandomArray(int min, int max, int count) {
    int[] result = new int[count];
    List<int> numbersInOrder = new List<int>();
    for (var x = min; x < max; x++) {
        numbersInOrder.Add(x);
    }
    for (var x = 0; x < count; x++) {
        var randomIndex = UnityEngine.Random.Range(0, numbersInOrder.Count);
        result[x] = numbersInOrder[randomIndex];
        numbersInOrder.RemoveAt(randomIndex);
    }

    return result;
}
2
  • Well UnityEngine.Random is a bit different then the C# equivalent. Of course you can convert to C# with little efforts. Jan 30, 2021 at 7:33
  • first for should probably go like this, otherwise max won't be selected. for (var x = min; x <= max; x++)
    – Filip12345
    Apr 2, 2023 at 20:24
3

Same as @Habib's answer, but as a function:

List<int> randomList = new List<int>();
int UniqueRandomInt(int min, int max)
{
    var rand = new Random();
    int myNumber;
    do
    {
       myNumber = rand.Next(min, max);
    } while (randomList.Contains(myNumber));
    return myNumber;
}

If randomList is a class property, UniqueRandomInt will return unique integers in the context of the same instance of that class. If you want it to be unique globally, you will need to make randomList static.

2

Depending on what you are really after you can do something like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

namespace SO14473321
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            UniqueRandom u = new UniqueRandom(Enumerable.Range(1,10));
            for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            {
                Console.Write("{0} ",u.Next());
            }
        }
    }

    class UniqueRandom
    {
        private readonly List<int> _currentList;
        private readonly Random _random = new Random();

        public UniqueRandom(IEnumerable<int> seed)
        {
            _currentList = new List<int>(seed);
        }

        public int Next()
        {
            if (_currentList.Count == 0)
            {
                throw new ApplicationException("No more numbers");
            }

            int i = _random.Next(_currentList.Count);
            int result = _currentList[i];
            _currentList.RemoveAt(i);
            return result;
        }
    }
}
1

And here my version of finding N random unique numbers using HashSet. Looks pretty simple, since HashSet can contain only different items. It's interesting - would it be faster then using List or Shuffler?

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class RnDHash
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            HashSet<int> rndIndexes = new HashSet<int>();
            Random rng = new Random();
            int maxNumber;
            Console.Write("Please input Max number: ");
            maxNumber = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
            int iter = 0;
            while (rndIndexes.Count != maxNumber)
            {
                int index = rng.Next(maxNumber);
                rndIndexes.Add(index);
                iter++;
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Random numbers were found in {0} iterations: ", iter);
            foreach (int num in rndIndexes)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(num);
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}
1
  • This is the best answer. It's a perfect use case for HashSet
    – pjpscriv
    Nov 19, 2021 at 4:44
1

I noted that the accepted answer keeps adding int to the list and keeps checking them with if (!randomList.Contains(MyNumber)) and I think this doesn't scale well, especially if you keep asking for new numbers.

I would do the opposite.

  1. Generate the list at startup, linearly
  2. Get a random index from the list
  3. Remove the found int from the list

This would require a slightly bit more time at startup, but will scale much much better.

public class RandomIntGenerator
{
    public Random a = new Random();
    private List<int> _validNumbers;

    private RandomIntGenerator(int desiredAmount, int start = 0)
    {
        _validNumbers = new List<int>();
        for (int i = 0; i < desiredAmount; i++)
            _validNumbers.Add(i + start);
    }

    private int GetRandomInt()
    {
        if (_validNumbers.Count == 0)
        {
            //you could throw an exception here
            return -1;
        }
        else
        {
            var nextIndex = a.Next(0, _validNumbers.Count - 1);
            var number    = _validNumbers[nextIndex];
            _validNumbers.RemoveAt(nextIndex);
            return number;
        }
    }
}
4
  • 1
    but doesn't removing an element from a list take O(n) time? the index approach is a nice one, but removing an element from a list(built on an array in .NET) would consume time, especially when the list is very big!
    – Artavazd
    Aug 12, 2020 at 15:29
  • Yes. You're right. In that case I just moved the consuming task earlier, rather than later. RemoveAt cost much early and less later, while Contains does the opposite (and it's also better memory-wise). I would need to optimize this. Aug 13, 2020 at 6:53
  • I'll be glad to see your optimized approach. thanks for sharing!
    – Artavazd
    Aug 13, 2020 at 8:51
  • 1
    to avoid list.Contains() you could use hashset for better performance and then ToArray() at the end Feb 2, 2023 at 22:46
0

It's may be a little bit late, but here is more suitable code, for example when you need to use loops:

            List<int> genered = new List<int>();

            Random rnd = new Random();

            for(int x = 0; x < files.Length; x++)
            {
                int value = rnd.Next(0, files.Length - 1);
                while (genered.Contains(value))
                {
                    value = rnd.Next(0, files.Length - 1);
                }
                genered.Add(value);

                returnFiles[x] = files[value];
            }
0
  • with Functional way*
        static Func<int> GetNextUniqueIntegerFunc(int min, int max)
        {
            var list = new List<int>();

            var random = new Random();

            int getNextValue()
            {
                while (true)
                {
                    var random_number = random.Next(min, max);

                    if (!list.Contains(random_number))
                    {
                        list.Add(random_number);

                        return random_number;
                    }
                }
            }

            return getNextValue;
        }
0
0
Random r = new Random(); int[] v = new int[10];
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {
            v[i] = r.Next(1, 25); // random numbers between (1) and (25)
            for (int j = 0; j < i; j++)
            {
                if (v[j] == v[i]) // if it is a duplicated value, create new one!
                    i--;
            }
        }

        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
            textBox1.Text += v[i].ToString() + " ";
1
  • 1
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center. Jul 3, 2023 at 20:53
-1

unique random number from 0 to 9

      int sum = 0;
        int[] hue = new int[10];
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        {

            int m;
            do
            {
                m = rand.Next(0, 10);
            } while (hue.Contains(m) && sum != 45);
            if (!hue.Contains(m))
            {
                hue[i] = m;
                sum = sum + m;
            }

        }
-3

You could also use a dataTable storing each random value, then simply perform the random method while != values in the dataColumn

-3

randomNumber function return unqiue integer value between 0 to 100000

  bool check[] = new bool[100001];
  Random r = new Random();
  public int randomNumber() {
      int num = r.Next(0,100000);
       while(check[num] == true) {
             num = r.Next(0,100000);
     }
    check[num] = true;
   return num;
 }
0
-3

hi here i posted one video ,and it explains how to generate unique random number

  public List<int> random_generator(){

  Random random = new Random();

   List<int> random_container = new List<int>;

     do{

       int random_number = random.next(10);

      if(!random_container.contains(random_number){

       random_container.add(random_number)
  }
}
   while(random_container.count!=10);


     return random_container; 
  }

here ,,, in random container you will get non repeated 10 numbers starts from 0 to 9(10 numbers) as random.. thank you........

1
  • 2
    This doesn't answer the question on System.Random.
    – JJJ
    Apr 7, 2019 at 13:23
-4

You can use basic Random Functions of C#

Random ran = new Random();
int randomno = ran.Next(0,100);

you can now use the value in the randomno in anything you want but keep in mind that this will generate a random number between 0 and 100 Only and you can extend that to any figure.

0
-8

Try this:

private void NewNumber()
  {
     Random a = new Random(Guid.newGuid().GetHashCode());
     MyNumber = a.Next(0, 10);
  }

Some Explnations:

Guid : base on here : Represents a globally unique identifier (GUID)

Guid.newGuid() produces a unique identifier like "936DA01F-9ABD-4d9d-80C7-02AF85C822A8"

and it will be unique in all over the universe base on here

Hash code here produce a unique integer from our unique identifier

so Guid.newGuid().GetHashCode() gives us a unique number and the random class will produce real random numbers throw this

Sample: https://rextester.com/ODOXS63244

generated ten random numbers with this approach with result of:

-1541116401
7
-1936409663
3
-804754459
8
1403945863
3
1287118327
1
2112146189
1
1461188435
9
-752742620
4
-175247185
4
1666734552
7

we got two 1s next to each other, but the hash codes do not same.

11
  • 3
    Please add an explanation.
    – OhBeWise
    Feb 23, 2016 at 17:52
  • @Rob Yes, this will produce a unique value, did you test that?
    – Arsalan
    Feb 2, 2017 at 14:21
  • 3
    No it won't. No reason at all that two successive calls will not yield the same value. Reseeding for each sample is a classic anti pattern. Jun 7, 2017 at 7:11
  • A Guid is a 128 bit number while int is 32 bits. So it will happen that two different Guids have the same hashcode. Plus two different seed values for Random may result in the same first value, especially in a very limited range like 0-10. Jul 31, 2018 at 8:50
  • @HansKesting Hi, base on this msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… GetHashCode returns an int32 value base on parameter object
    – Arsalan
    Jul 31, 2018 at 10:16

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