5

f() does not return even though it's signature say it should. Why is the reason for allowing this to compiling? Is there a reason the C standard does not require the compiler to make it fail?

I know that it is Undefined behavior and all, but why is it allowed in the first place? Is there a historical reason?

double f(){}

int main()
{
    f();
    return 0;
}
8
  • 3
    Because this is Undefined behavior. If you compile with strict warnings a good compiler shall point it out for you.
    – Alok Save
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:29
  • 2
    @AlokSave Yes, but why is it allowed? Is there a historical reason?
    – nishantjr
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:30
  • It's pretty easy for the compiler to catch the error, and I can see no reason for allowing it in the first place.
    – nishantjr
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:31
  • 3
    Any such requirement would burden the compiler to check every possible return path, which is as you say pretty easy for a modern day compiler but was not so easy in pre standardization compilers.
    – Alok Save
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:34
  • 1
    This question could be useful for you: stackoverflow.com/questions/12376461/… Jan 23, 2013 at 15:36

4 Answers 4

4

Is there a reason the C standard does not require the compiler to make it fail?

By invoking undefined behavior, the C standard allowed the compilers to be less complicated. There is indeed some cases, such as if statements, in which it is hard to say whether the function returns a value or not:

int f(int n)
{
  if (n > 0) return 1;
}
  • If I write f(5), it is easy for the compiler to say that the function is correct.
  • If I write f(-5), it is also easy to detect an undefined return value.

But if the argument comes from user input for example, how should the compiler be able to know whether the function returns a value? Since this could both a valid or a wrong program, C standard allows the compilers to do what they want. C is designed to be as smart and simple as possible.

8
  • But, the signature says it accepts ints, so the function should be defined for all int values. Shouldn't it? Why is that difficult to enforce?
    – nishantjr
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:40
  • @njr: Well (from my example), if I call f(5), it is easy for the compiler to say that there is no undefined behavior. If I have f(-5), it is also easy to detect the undefined behavior. But if the argument comes from a user input for example, how should the compiler be able to know whether the function returns a value or not?
    – md5
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:42
  • At compile time? It knows that n>5 can be false. Could it be to make the executable smaller?
    – nishantjr
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:44
  • 3
    @njr: it would probably be a bad idea to enforce that if a function takes int then it should have defined behavior for all int inputs. For example, int plusone(int i) { return i + 1; } has undefined behavior for the input INT_MAX. That's just how C does business, it doesn't force you to add code to handle all cases, if you don't want to. Jan 23, 2013 at 16:04
  • 1
    @ArunSaha: the requirement to return a value (if the caller uses the return value), is a semantic restriction in C99, not a syntactic constraint. f is syntactically correct. The question amounts to, "why isn't it a syntactic constraint?". plusone is intended solely as an example to njr (whose day it is for suggesting potential syntactic constraints ;-)) why there's no syntactic requirement that every input value must have defined behavior. You're right that this is a different issue from why there's no syntactic requirement that every path must have a return statement. Jan 23, 2013 at 17:31
1

The compiler could certainly analyze all code paths for the function and reject the program if it cannot prove that the function always returns a meaningful value. I suppose the reason the standard does not mandate it is that in the old days compilers were much less sophisticated than we work with today.

Of course using the return value of such a function is undefined behavior:

If the } that terminates a function is reached, and the value of the function call is used by the caller, the behavior is undefined.

1

It's easy to tell that your function will reach the end without returning a value. It doesn't return and it doesn't call any code that could prevent it reaching the end (like abort()).

In fact your program does not have undefined behavior in C99, since the missing return value isn't used by the caller. 6.9.1/12:

If the } that terminates a function is reached, and the value of the function call is used by the caller, the behavior is undefined.

So your code has questionable style, but is well-defined.

The C++ standard changes the rule and remarks on that change in [diff.stat]. It says that the C version of the rule is to support code that was written back in the days when C didn't distinguish between int return and void return. So the reason your code has defined behavior in the first place is "legacy". That said, AFAIK C has always distinguished between double return and int return, so it could probably have made it UB for a function returning double to fall off the end, had it been done at the right time.

Leaving aside whether the return value is used, consider a tricker function:

double f() {
    if (g()) exit();
}

This function also contains no return statements, but doesn't reach the end of the function if in fact g always returns a true value or doesn't return at all. So this function should be accepted even if its return value is used, on the general C standard principle that you're expected to know what you're doing and mean what you say. If g is defined in a different TU then you probably know more about it than the compiler does.

Even if it weren't for the legacy reasons, I'm pretty sure that the standard simply cannot be bothered adding text in order to define what non-return scenarios compilers are required to detect. It's left to quality of implementation -- if it can be determined at compile time that your function cannot possibly avoid UB then maybe the compiler will warn anyway despite no diagnostic being required. For that matter, it will occasionally warn when behavior is defined on the general C implementer's principle that some things are so daft that no user could reasonably mean them.

7
  • 2
    Is reaching the end without returning UB by itself? Even if the return value is not accessed?
    – Jon
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:38
  • @Jon: good point. No, in C it's not. In C++ it is (6.6.3/2). I say this as the reason for my error, not an excuse ;-) Jan 23, 2013 at 15:41
  • And I was asking merely to make sure that I didn't have the wrong impression :-). On another point, the compiler could demand that you either add a sane return 0; at the end or else make it void f() -- either one or the other makes more sense no matter what g() does at runtime. But it's certainly not in the C-spirit of que sera, sera.
    – Jon
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:44
  • @Jon: the compiler could certainly warn if you don't add return 0 (or perhaps some implementation-defined __unreachable). But it has to accept conforming code or else it's not a conforming C implementation, so it will only go so far to prevent you doing something stupid. Jan 23, 2013 at 15:47
  • Of course, my point was that if you wrote the standard today it wouldn't be unreasonable to demand this. But for C it's as if written in stone, changing this today would probably break more programs than there are grains of sand on a beach.
    – Jon
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:52
0

Because the compiler can not tell if the function returns at runtime or not.

4
  • 2
    The question may be confusingly worded. I think the OP was trying to ask why he didn't get a compiler error when his function is supposed to return a double but has no path which actually returns anything.
    – simonc
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:33
  • But it can tell there is no return while the function asserts that it returns a double. That's a pretty serious contradiction.
    – Jon
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:33
  • @Jon It can tell that no return keyword occurs. Telling if all paths actually hit a return is much, much harder.
    – user395760
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:36
  • According to my experience compilers issue a warning if a path without return value is found, but maybe it's not standardized.
    – junix
    Jan 23, 2013 at 15:37

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