3

Does anyone have example code of TDictionary<TKey, TValue> being populated during its constructor?

3

You need to call the dictionary constructor overload that receives a Collection parameter of type TEnumerable<TPair<TKey, TValue>>.

For example, suppose that we have TDictionary<string, Integer>. Then we could pass to the constructor an instance of TEnumerable<TPair<string, Integer>>. An example of such a thing is TList<TPair<string, Integer>>.

List := TList<TPair<string, Integer>>.Create;
List.Add(TPair<string, Integer>.Create('Foo', 42));
List.Add(TPair<string, Integer>.Create('Bar', 666));
Dictionary := TDictionary<string, Integer>.Create(List);

This is very unwieldy and you would never prefer this option over a simple Create followed by a series of calls to Add. You would only use the option of passing in an existing collection if you happened to a ready-made one at hand.

Another example of a class that derives from TEnumerable<T> is TDictionary itself:

type
  TDictionary<TKey,TValue> = class(TEnumerable<TPair<TKey,TValue>>)

So if you already had one instance of the dictionary, you could create another one and initialise it with the contents of the first:

Dict2 := TDictionary<string, Integer>.Create(Dict1);
  • I may be confused, but I thought that:constructor Create(Collection: TEnumerable<TPair<TKey,TValue>>); overload; was telling me that I could populate the TDictionary with multiple pairs of <key,value> during the create method. Am I misreading the notation? – SysJames Jan 23 '13 at 22:43
  • 1
    There are only two constructor overloads that allow you to populate during construction. They both receive an instance of a class of type TEnumerable<TPair<TKey,TValue>>. You can write a helper function to create one of those that would allow inline coding. It's a long way from the Python version: Dictionary = {'Foo': 42, 'Bar': 666} – David Heffernan Jan 23 '13 at 22:49
  • 1
    Actually you can't even readily write a helper function here since you need to free the temp container that you pass to the constructor. So, yes, the design of this class is against you. This is a situation where some of the other container libraries may be more flexible. I don't know it, but I hear lots of good things about the containers in the Delphi spring library. – David Heffernan Jan 23 '13 at 22:51
  • 1
    @David too bad it doesn't also take an IEnumerable<> – Cosmin Prund Jan 24 '13 at 8:28
  • 1
    @David, as demonstrated in my answer, an open array of pairs is very hard to instantiate in a readable way. That's why I used the with operator, so I can use the helper P class function. There's no syntax in Delphi to initialize a record with a nice one-liner, you need to call a constructor. – Cosmin Prund Jan 24 '13 at 8:33
4

Apparently you just want a one-liner, so I gave this a try, implemented a TDictHelper that allows creating AND populating the dictionary using a one-liner.


The problem with initializing the Dictionary using any form of one-liner is that it needs pairs of values, and we don't have the required nice syntax to pass those pairs. For example, if one would be required to use the TPair<Key, Value>.Create(A, B) syntax for each pair of values added to the dictionary, that would be one ugly one liner.

I did figure out a couple of good-looking alternatives; The first one is used like this:

  with TDictHelper<Integer, string> do
    Dict := Make([P(1, 'one'), P(2, 'two')]);

The use of the with is required because the TDictHelper class I implemented has a Make routine that takes an array of TPair<Key, Value> as parameter; This would be unusable if I wrote it as:

Dict := TDictHelper<Integer, string>.Make(TPair<Integer, string>.Create(1, 'one'), TPair<Integer, string>.Create(2, 'two'));

It would work, but it would be very, very ugly!

Since the use of the with can be problematic (especially if you'd like to use two kinds of dictionaries), I included an alternative syntax; Unfortunately this one does not scale, it gets real ugly real fast:

  Dict := TDictHelper<Integer, string>.Make([1, 2], ['one', 'two']);

This alternative takes two separate arrays for Keys and Values, combines them inside the Make method. Looks ok for 2-3 elements, but would not scale: what if you have 10 elements and need to remove the 7th pair? You'd need to COUNT the elements and that's error-prone.

Here's the complete code, not much to it:

program Project25;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

uses
  SysUtils, Generics.Collections;

type
  TDictHelper<Key, Value> = class
  public
    class function P(const K:Key; const V:Value): TPair<Key, Value>;
    class function Make(init: array of TPair<Key, Value>): TDictionary<Key, Value>;overload;
    class function Make(KeyArray: array of Key; ValueArray: array of Value): TDictionary<Key, Value>;overload;
  end;

{ TDictHelper<Key, Value> }

class function TDictHelper<Key, Value>.Make(init: array of TPair<Key, Value>): TDictionary<Key, Value>;
var P: TPair<Key, Value>;
begin
  Result := TDictionary<Key, Value>.Create;
  for P in init do
    Result.AddOrSetValue(P.Key, P.Value);
end;

class function TDictHelper<Key, Value>.Make(KeyArray: array of Key;
  ValueArray: array of Value): TDictionary<Key, Value>;
var i:Integer;
begin
  if Length(KeyArray) <> Length(ValueArray) then
    raise Exception.Create('Number of keys does not match number of values.');
  Result := TDictionary<Key, Value>.Create;
  for i:=0 to High(KeyArray) do
    Result.AddOrSetValue(KeyArray[i], ValueArray[i]);
end;

class function TDictHelper<Key, Value>.P(const K: Key;
  const V: Value): TPair<Key, Value>;
begin
  Result := TPair<Key, Value>.Create(K, V);
end;

// ============================== TEST CODE FOLLOWS

var Dict: TDictionary<Integer, string>;
    Pair: TPair<Integer, string>;

begin
  try
    try
      // Nice-looking but requires "with" and you can't work with two kinds of DictHelper at once
      with TDictHelper<Integer, string> do
        Dict := Make([P(1, 'one'), P(2, 'two')]);
      // Use the array
      for Pair in Dict do
        WriteLn(Pair.Key, ' = ', Pair.Value);
      Dict.Free;

      // Passing the Keys and the Values in separate arrays; Works without "with" but it would
      // be difficult to maintain for larger number of key/value pairs
      Dict := TDictHelper<Integer, string>.Make([1, 2], ['one', 'two']);
      // Use the array
      for Pair in Dict do
        WriteLn(Pair.Key, ' = ', Pair.Value);
      Dict.Free;

    except on E:Exception do
      WriteLn(E.ClassName, #13#10, E.Message);
    end;
  finally ReadLn;
  end;
end.
  • 1
    This is neat. Note that it never does precisely what the question asked, namely to populate the dict in its constructor. Anyway, when the dict constructor does so using TEnumerable, it calls AddOrSetValue which you may wish to mimic here. – David Heffernan Jan 24 '13 at 8:10
  • @David, I took the question as asking for a one-liner way of populating the TDictionary<>. I might be wrong, of course. – Cosmin Prund Jan 24 '13 at 8:30
  • No, that's fair enough. I'm happy with a bit of creative interpretation. I was being literal in my answer. Yours is worth +1. – David Heffernan Jan 24 '13 at 8:31
0

In the following example an array of keys and values is passed to the custom constructor. The keys and the values are placed in the same array using the pattern: key1, value1, key2, value2, ...., keyN, valueN. The array has to contain an even number of items.

unit MainUnit;

interface

uses
  Winapi.Windows, Winapi.Messages, System.SysUtils, System.Variants, System.Classes, Vcl.Graphics,
  Vcl.Controls, Vcl.Forms, Vcl.Dialogs, System.Generics.Collections, System.Rtti;


type
  TForm3 = class(TForm)
  private
    { Private declarations }
  public
    { Public declarations }
  end;

  TMyDictionary<TK, TV> = class(TDictionary<TK,TV>)
    constructor Create(const values: array of variant);
  end;

var
  Form3: TForm3;
  extensions: TMyDictionary<string, integer>;

implementation

constructor TMyDictionary<TK, TV>.Create(const values: array of variant);
var
  I: Integer;
  k, v: TValue;
  kt: TK;
  vt: TV;
begin
  inherited Create(Length(values) div 2);
  I := Low(values);
  while i <= High(values)  do
  begin
    k := TValue.FromVariant(values[i]);
    v := TValue.FromVariant(values[i + 1]);
    kt := k.AsType<TK>;
    vt := v.AsType<TV>;
    Add(kt, vt);
    Inc(I, 2);
  end;

end;

{$R *.dfm}
begin

 extensions := TMyDictionary<string, integer>.Create(['1', 1, '3', 3]);

 OutputDebugString(PChar(IntToStr(extensions['1'])));
end.

I am not too sure about the performance of the TValue methods, but if you have a few items I think it is negligible.

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