162

I am adding two numbers, but I don't get a correct value.

For example, doing 1 + 2 returns 12 and not 3

What am I doing wrong in this code?

function myFunction() {
  var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
  var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
  var x = y + z;
  document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
}
<p>
  Click the button to calculate x.
  <button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
</p>
<p>
  Enter first number:
  <input type="text" id="txt1" name="text1" value="1">
  Enter second number:
  <input type="text" id="txt2" name="text2" value="2">
</p>
<p id="demo"></p>

  • What type of values are you expecting as input? Integers or decimals? – Zorayr Jan 24 '13 at 8:20
  • 1
    A text input value will be string and strings will always concatenate instead of addition – hank Jan 24 '13 at 8:27
  • 1
    A good write-up on converting is in this Answer. – akTed Jan 24 '13 at 8:29
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of How to add two strings as if they were numbers? – Organic Advocate Jul 11 '17 at 18:59
  • If you have an <input type="number">, you can simply get its .valueAsNumber property directly. – Sebastian Simon Aug 30 '18 at 16:30

20 Answers 20

307

They are actually strings, not numbers. The easiest way to produce a number from a string is to prepend it with +:

var x = +y + +z;
  • 4
    out of curiousity (myself not a JavaScript programmer) (and I think this would improve the answer), what does the +-prefix do with strings? – Sebastian Mach Jan 24 '13 at 8:10
  • 27
    The above code is a bit bizarre and will confuse less seasoned developers. The code will also fail JSLint for confusing use of '+'. – Zorayr Jan 24 '13 at 8:23
  • 2
    @phresnel: unary + operators – akTed Jan 24 '13 at 8:28
  • 10
    @AKTed: Actually I wanted to provoke elclanrs to describe it a bit within his answer. Of course I am not unable to do the google search myself; but it would (imo) improve the quality of the answer, especially because using prefix-+ for string conversion is pretty uncommon in other programming languages and might confuse newbies. (however, thanks for sharing the link) – Sebastian Mach Jan 24 '13 at 8:37
  • 2
    I would discourage anyone from using this shortcut. I know that actually parsing a string into a number requires more code but at least the code clearly matches the intention. – Si Kelly May 10 '17 at 12:33
114

I just use Number():

var i=2;  
var j=3;  
var k = Number(i) + Number(j); // 5  
  • I kept making this mistake which always concats: var k += Number(i) – John Phelps May 29 at 18:43
28

You need to use javaScript's parseInt() method to turn the strings back into numbers. Right now they are strings so adding two strings concatenates them, which is why you're getting "12".

  • 1
    I'm not sure parseInt() is the best option here given that the OP's function is adding two user-entered "numbers", not two "integers". – nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:17
  • 2
    @nnnnnn I think, that could easily be amended with parseFloat should the OP provide more input. – Yoshi Jan 24 '13 at 8:25
  • 1
    @Yoshi - Yes, yes it could, but given that the answer doesn't actually say anywhere that parseInt() only returns integers, and doesn't explain any of parseInt()'s "quirks" - which could be a problem with user-entered data - I thought it was worth mentioning. (I didn't actually downvote or anything.) – nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:42
  • Yes, I had made an assumption that the input would be integers since they gave an example of 1 + 2, but you're right - parseFloat() may be better if they are just any 'numbers'. – mitim Jan 24 '13 at 9:23
22

Use parseInt(...) but make sure you specify a radix value; otherwise you will run into several bugs (if the string begins with "0", the radix is octal/8 etc.).

var x = parseInt(stringValueX, 10);
var y = parseInt(stringValueY, 10);

alert(x + y);

Hope this helps!

  • 5
    I'm not sure parseInt() is the best option here given that the OP's function is adding two user-entered "numbers", not two "integers". – nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:16
  • 1
    Unless he is expecting floating point values, I think using this approach still works great. – Zorayr Jan 24 '13 at 8:24
  • 1
    This is no longer a problem in ES6. The radix may be safely omitted. parseInt("012") works fine, returning 12. Of course, you still have to careful with things like [1,2].map(parseInt). – user663031 Sep 23 '16 at 19:07
5

Simple

var result = parseInt("1") + parseInt("2");
console.log(result ); // Outputs 3
5

Just add a simple type casting method as the input is taken in text. Use the following:

    var y = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt1").value);
    var z = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt2").value);
    var x = y + z;
4

This won't sum up the number; instead it will concatenate it:

var x = y + z;

You need to do:

var x = (y)+(z);

You must use parseInt in order to specify the operation on numbers. Example:

var x = parseInt(y) + parseInt(z); [final soulution, as everything us]
  • This should be the correct answer for addition and subtraction not the accepted one. – MR_AMDEV Apr 20 at 18:27
3

This code sums both the variables! Put it into your function

var y = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt1").value);
var z = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt2").value);
var x = (y +z);
document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;`
3

The following may be useful in general terms.

  • First, HTML form fields are limited to text. That applies especially to text boxes, even if you have taken pains to ensure that the value looks like a number.

  • Second, JavaScript, for better or worse, has overloaded the + operator with two meanings: it adds numbers, and it concatenates strings. It has a preference for concatenation, so even an expression like 3+'4' will be treated as concatenation.

  • Third, JavaScript will attempt to change types dynamically if it can, and if it needs to. For example '2'*'3' will change both types to numbers, since you can’t multiply strings. If one of them is incompatible, you will get NaN, Not a Number.

Your problem occurs because the data coming from the form is regarded as a string, and the + will therefore concatenate rather than add.

When reading supposedly numeric data from a form, you should always push it through parseInt() or parseFloat(), depending on whether you want an integer or a decimal.

Note that neither function truly converts a string to a number. Instead, it will parse the string from left to right until it gets to an invalid numeric character or to the end and convert what has been accepted. In the case of parseFloat, that includes one decimal point, but not two.

Anything after the valid number is simply ignored. They fail if the string doesn’t even start off as a number. Then you will get NaN.

A good general purpose technique for numbers from forms is something like this:

var data=parseInt(form['data'].value);  //  or parseFloat

If you’re prepared to coalesce an invalid string to 0, you can use:

var data=parseInt(form['data'].value) || 0;
1

You are missing the type conversion during the addition step...
var x = y + z; should be var x = parseInt(y) + parseInt(z);

 <!DOCTYPE html>

 <html>
 <body>
  <p>Click the button to calculate x.</p>
  <button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
  <br/>
  <br/>Enter first number:
  <input type="text" id="txt1" name="text1">Enter second number:
  <input type="text" id="txt2" name="text2">
  <p id="demo"></p>
 <script>
    function myFunction() 
    {
      var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
      var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
      var x = parseInt(y) + parseInt(z);
      document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
    }
 </script>
 </body>
 </html>
  • I added a clarification to your answer to point out where the issue was. – Stuart Siegler Feb 28 '15 at 20:02
1
  <input type="text" name="num1" id="num1" onkeyup="sum()">
  <input type="text" name="num2" id="num2" onkeyup="sum()">
  <input type="text" name="num2" id="result">

  <script>
     function sum()
     {

        var number1 = document.getElementById('num1').value;
        var number2 = document.getElementById('num2').value;

        if (number1 == '') {
           number1 = 0
           var num3 = parseInt(number1) + parseInt(number2);
           document.getElementById('result').value = num3;
        }
        else if(number2 == '')
        {
           number2 = 0;
           var num3 = parseInt(number1) + parseInt(number2);
           document.getElementById('result').value = num3;
        }
        else
        {
           var num3 = parseInt(number1) + parseInt(number2);
           document.getElementById('result').value = num3;
        }

     }
  </script>
  • 3
    Add some explanation with answer for how this answer help OP in fixing current issue – ρяσѕρєя K May 30 '17 at 5:33
1

It's very simple:

<html>

    <body>
        <p>Click the button to calculate x.</p>
        <button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
        <br/>
        <br/>Enter first number:
        <input type="text" id="txt1" name="text1">Enter second number:
        <input type="text" id="txt2" name="text2">
        <p id="demo"></p>

        <script>
            function myFunction() {
                var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
                var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
                var x = +y + +z;
                document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
            }
        </script>
    </body>
</html>
1

Try this:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>

    <body>
        <p>Add Section</p>

        <label>First Number:</label>
        <input id="txt1"  type="text"/><br />
        <label>Second Number:</label>
        <input id="txt2"  type="text"/><br />

        <input type="button" name="Add" value="Add" onclick="addTwoNumber()"/>
        <p id="demo"></p>

        <script>
            function myFunction() {
                document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = Date();
            }

            function addTwoNumber(){
                var a = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
                var b = document.getElementById("txt2").value;

                var x = Number(a) + Number(b);
                document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = "Add Value: " + x;
            }
        </script>
    </body>
</html>
1
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript">
            function addition()
            {
                var a = parseInt(form.input1.value);
                var b = parseInt(form.input2.value);
                var c = a+b
                document.write(c);
            }
        </script>
    </head>

    <body>
        <form name="form" method="GET">
        <input type="text" name="input1" value=20><br>
        <input type="text" name="input2" value=10><br>
        <input type="button" value="ADD" onclick="addition()">
        </form>
    </body>
</html>
  • 3
    Welcome to SO! Can you please explain a little bit more? Your answer is only code, so it might work, but the questioner (or other visitors!) might not understand why it works. – Chilion Dec 11 '15 at 9:32
1

If we have two input fields then get the values from input fields, and then add them using JavaScript.

$('input[name="yourname"]').keyup(function(event) {
    /* Act on the event */
    var value1 = $(this).val();
    var value2 = $('input[name="secondName"]').val();
    var roundofa = +value2+ +value1;

    $('input[name="total"]').val(addition);
});
0

You can do a precheck with regular expression wheather they are numbers as like

function myFunction() {
    var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
    var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
    if((x.search(/[^0-9]/g) != -1)&&(y.search(/[^0-9]/g) != -1))
      var x = Number(y)+ Number(z);
    else
      alert("invalid values....");
    document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
  }
  • Instead of regular expressions you could just use parseXX and check for NaN return. – hank Jan 24 '13 at 8:30
  • Validating user-entered data is always a good plan, but you still need to convert the input strings to numeric form before you can do a numeric addition. – nnnnnn Jan 24 '13 at 8:36
  • yeah thats right.. I should have used Number(value).. – Ram Jan 24 '13 at 9:01
0

Use parseFloat it will convert string to number including decimal values.

 function myFunction() {
      var y = document.getElementById("txt1").value;
      var z = document.getElementById("txt2").value;
      var x = parseFloat(y) + parseFloat(z);
      document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
    }


<p>
  Click the button to calculate x.
  <button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
</p>
<p>
  Enter first number:
  <input type="text" id="txt1" name="text1" value="1">
  Enter second number:
  <input type="text" id="txt2" name="text2" value="2">
</p>
<p id="demo"></p>
0

You can also write : var z = x - -y ; And you get correct answer.

<body>

<input type="text" id="number1" name="">
<input type="text" id="number2" name="">
<button type="button" onclick="myFunction()">Submit</button>

<p id="demo"></p>

    <script>
    function myFunction() {
        var x, y ;

        x = document.getElementById('number1').value;
        y = document.getElementById('number2').value;

        var z = x - -y ;

        document.getElementById('demo').innerHTML = z;
    }
    </script>
</body>
0

Here goes your code by parsing the variables in the function.

<html>
  <body>
    <p>Click the button to calculate x.</p>
    <button onclick="myFunction()">Try it</button>
    <br/>
    <br/>Enter first number:
    <input type="text" id="txt1" name="text1">
    <br>Enter second number:
    <input type="text" id="txt2" name="text2">
    <p id="demo"></p>
    <script>
      function myFunction() {
        var y = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt1").value);
        var z = parseInt(document.getElementById("txt2").value);
        var x = y + z;
        document.getElementById("demo").innerHTML = x;
      }
    </script>
  </body>
</html>

Answer

Enter image description here

-1

An alternative solution, just sharing :) :

var result=eval(num1)+eval(num2);

protected by Cody Gray Aug 16 '17 at 13:43

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