How can I in C language format a number from 1123456789 to 1,123,456,789? I tried using printf("%'10d\n", 1123456789); but that doesn't work.

Could you advise anything? The simpler the solution the better.

  • 1
    Just an FYI: the 'thousands separator' flag for the printf() family of formatted IO functions (the single-quote character: ') is a non-standard flag that's supported only in a few library implementations. It's too bad that it's not standard. – Michael Burr Sep 20 '09 at 0:55
  • It's locale-dependent. According to the Linux man page, it looks at LC_NUMERIC. However, I don't know what locale supports this. – Joey Adams Nov 4 '10 at 4:13
  • 1
    @Joey, setting the LC_NUMERIC locale to the current "" makes the ' work on my Mac and on a linux machine I just checked. – Carl Norum Jul 27 '12 at 20:32
  • Note that the POSIX 2008 (2013) versions of the printf() family of functions does standardize the use of the ' (single quote or apostrophe) character with the decimal number formatting conversion specifications to specify that the number should be formatted with thousands separators. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '15 at 18:09
  • 1
    Also note that in the default "C" locale, the non-monetary thousands separator is undefined, so the "%'d" won't produce commas in the "C" locale. You need to set a locale with an appropriate non-monetary thousand separator. Often, setlocale(LC_ALL, ""); will do the job — other values for the locale name (other than the empty string) are implementation defined. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '15 at 18:46

19 Answers 19

If your printf supports the ' flag, you can probably do it just by setting your locale appropriately. Example:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>

int main(void)
{
    setlocale(LC_NUMERIC, "");
    printf("%'d\n", 1123456789);
    return 0;
}

And build & run:

$ ./example 
1,123,456,789

Tested on Mac OS X & Linux (Ubuntu 10.10).

  • 1
    I've tested this on sprintf() in an embedded system and it doesn't work (obviously, because as you say, it won't support the ' flag. – gbmhunter May 8 '13 at 2:32
  • I'm sure you can find a C library that would support it without too much trouble. – Carl Norum May 8 '13 at 3:05
  • I had a quick look, didn't find anything suitable, and implemented my own using some of the ideas above. It would be great to find an actual library, so that you can use it on floats and strings with decimal places. – gbmhunter May 9 '13 at 10:40
  • FWIW AtmelStudio's embedded system printf() appears tragically not to support the ' modifier. From the header: Copyright ... 2007 Joerg Wunsch ... 1993 Regents of the University of California i.e. a BSD derivative. – Bob Stein Mar 7 '14 at 16:25
  • It works on Linux (ArchLinux). That's the solution I was looking for. Thanks! – David Guyon Jun 17 '14 at 7:55

You can do it recursively as follows (beware INT_MIN if you're using two's complement, you'll need extra code to manage that):

void printfcomma2 (int n) {
    if (n < 1000) {
        printf ("%d", n);
        return;
    }
    printfcomma2 (n/1000);
    printf (",%03d", n%1000);
}

void printfcomma (int n) {
    if (n < 0) {
        printf ("-");
        n = -n;
    }
    printfcomma2 (n);
}

A summmary:

  • User calls printfcomma with an integer, the special case of negative numbers is handled by simply printing "-" and making the number positive (this is the bit that won't work with INT_MIN).
  • When you enter printfcomma2, a number less than 1,000 will just print and return.
  • Otherwise the recursion will be called on the next level up (so 1,234,567 will be called with 1,234, then 1) until a number less than 1,000 is found.
  • Then that number will be printed and we'll walk back up the recursion tree, printing a comma and the next number as we go.

There is also the more succinct version though it does unnecessary processing in checking for negative numbers at every level (not that this will matter given the limited number of recursion levels). This one is a complete program for testing:

#include <stdio.h>

void printfcomma (int n) {
    if (n < 0) {
        printf ("-");
        printfcomma (-n);
        return;
    }
    if (n < 1000) {
        printf ("%d", n);
        return;
    }
    printfcomma (n/1000);
    printf (",%03d", n%1000);
}

int main (void) {
    int x[] = {-1234567890, -123456, -12345, -1000, -999, -1,
               0, 1, 999, 1000, 12345, 123456, 1234567890};
    int *px = x;
    while (px != &(x[sizeof(x)/sizeof(*x)])) {
        printf ("%-15d: ", *px);
        printfcomma (*px);
        printf ("\n");
        px++;
    }
    return 0;
}

and the output is:

-1234567890    : -1,234,567,890
-123456        : -123,456
-12345         : -12,345
-1000          : -1,000
-999           : -999
-1             : -1
0              : 0
1              : 1
999            : 999
1000           : 1,000
12345          : 12,345
123456         : 123,456
1234567890     : 1,234,567,890

An iterative solution for those who don't trust recursion (although the only problem with recursion tends to be stack space which will not be an issue here since it'll only be a few levels deep even for a 64-bit integer):

void printfcomma (int n) {
    int n2 = 0;
    int scale = 1;
    if (n < 0) {
        printf ("-");
        n = -n;
    }
    while (n >= 1000) {
        n2 = n2 + scale * (n % 1000);
        n /= 1000;
        scale *= 1000;
    }
    printf ("%d", n);
    while (scale != 1) {
        scale /= 1000;
        n = n2 / scale;
        n2 = n2  % scale;
        printf (",%03d", n);
    }
}

Both of these generate 2,147,483,647 for INT_MAX.

  • 2
    +1 for a recursive implementation! Well tought! – Vargas Sep 20 '09 at 0:05
  • +1, very sweet indeed – Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 20 '09 at 0:31
  • I think this should rather be solved iteratively, as the problem is more naturally iterative ("seperate every third digit") than recursive ("seperate the third digit from the rest, then repeat this on the rest"). – Joren Sep 20 '09 at 0:55
  • Suggested fix for MIN_INT: change printfcomma2 to take an unsigned int. That's it. Not very much "extra code" :-) – Steve Jessop Sep 20 '09 at 0:57
  • @Joren: I have added an iterative solution, and to some extent it shows why the recursive solution has merit. Although in many cases avoidance of recursion is a coding standards issue. – Clifford Sep 20 '09 at 8:15

Here's a very simple implementation. This function contains no error checking, buffer sizes must be verified by the caller. It also does not work for negative numbers. Such improvements are left as an exercise for the reader.

void format_commas(int n, char *out)
{
    int c;
    char buf[20];
    char *p;

    sprintf(buf, "%d", n);
    c = 2 - strlen(buf) % 3;
    for (p = buf; *p != 0; p++) {
       *out++ = *p;
       if (c == 1) {
           *out++ = ',';
       }
       c = (c + 1) % 3;
    }
    *--out = 0;
}
  • I like this one, it uses sprintf instead of printf, which is useful for embedded systems. – gbmhunter May 8 '13 at 2:04
  • 1
    Quite nice, but with needs some minor tweaks to work for negative numbers. – ideasman42 Jul 17 '14 at 4:36
  • (modified version for negative number support stackoverflow.com/a/24795133/432509) – ideasman42 Oct 8 '15 at 4:37
  • What does the magic number 2 mean? – stackptr Apr 8 '16 at 0:17

Egads! I do this all the time, using gcc/g++ and glibc on linux and yes, the ' operator may be non-standard, but I like the simplicity of it.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <locale.h>

int main()
{
    int bignum=12345678;

    setlocale(LC_ALL,"");

    printf("Big number: %'d\n",bignum);

    return 0;
}

Gives output of:

Big number: 12,345,678

Just have to remember the 'setlocale' call in there, otherwise it won't format anything.

  • 1
    Sadly, this doesn't seem to work in Windows/gcc 4.9.2. – rdtsc Mar 26 '17 at 22:09
  • Well Drat! I would have figured that gcc on any platform would give similar results regardless of OS. Good to know I suppose, wonder why though. Hmmmmm..... – lornix Mar 27 '17 at 5:37

Perhaps a locale-aware version would be interesting.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <locale.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <limits.h>

static int next_group(char const **grouping) {
    if ((*grouping)[1] == CHAR_MAX)
        return 0;
    if ((*grouping)[1] != '\0')
        ++*grouping;
    return **grouping;
}

size_t commafmt(char   *buf,            /* Buffer for formatted string  */
                int     bufsize,        /* Size of buffer               */
                long    N)              /* Number to convert            */
{
    int i;
    int len = 1;
    int posn = 1;
    int sign = 1;
    char *ptr = buf + bufsize - 1;

    struct lconv *fmt_info = localeconv();
    char const *tsep = fmt_info->thousands_sep;
    char const *group = fmt_info->grouping;
    char const *neg = fmt_info->negative_sign;
    size_t sep_len = strlen(tsep);
    size_t group_len = strlen(group);
    size_t neg_len = strlen(neg);
    int places = (int)*group;

    if (bufsize < 2)
    {
ABORT:
        *buf = '\0';
        return 0;
    }

    *ptr-- = '\0';
    --bufsize;
    if (N < 0L)
    {
        sign = -1;
        N = -N;
    }

    for ( ; len <= bufsize; ++len, ++posn)
    {
        *ptr-- = (char)((N % 10L) + '0');
        if (0L == (N /= 10L))
            break;
        if (places && (0 == (posn % places)))
        {
            places = next_group(&group);
            for (int i=sep_len; i>0; i--) {
                *ptr-- = tsep[i-1];
                if (++len >= bufsize)
                    goto ABORT;
            }
        }
        if (len >= bufsize)
            goto ABORT;
    }

    if (sign < 0)
    {
        if (len >= bufsize)
            goto ABORT;
        for (int i=neg_len; i>0; i--) {
            *ptr-- = neg[i-1];
            if (++len >= bufsize)
                goto ABORT;
        }
    }

    memmove(buf, ++ptr, len + 1);
    return (size_t)len;
}

#ifdef TEST
#include <stdio.h>

#define elements(x) (sizeof(x)/sizeof(x[0]))

void show(long i) {
    char buffer[32];

    commafmt(buffer, sizeof(buffer), i);
    printf("%s\n", buffer);
    commafmt(buffer, sizeof(buffer), -i);
    printf("%s\n", buffer);
}


int main() {

    long inputs[] = {1, 12, 123, 1234, 12345, 123456, 1234567, 12345678 };

    for (int i=0; i<elements(inputs); i++) {
        setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
        show(inputs[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}

#endif

This does have a bug (but one I'd consider fairly minor). On two's complement hardware, it won't convert the most-negative number correctly, because it attempts to convert a negative number to its equivalent positive number with N = -N; In two's complement, the maximally negative number doesn't have a corresponding positive number, unless you promote it to a larger type. One way to get around this is by promoting the number the corresponding unsigned type (but it's is somewhat non-trivial).

  • I asked a question directed more toward a cross platform implementation of the format '-flag here: stackoverflow.com/q/44523855/2642059 I think this answer perfectly addresses that, doing more testing now. If so I guess I should mark that question as a dupe huh? – Jonathan Mee Jun 13 '17 at 14:40
  • OK, first thing I've recognized, it doesn't adjust as the locale adjusts. Why maintain, tsep, place_str, and neg_str at all? Why not just directly use fmt_info's members? – Jonathan Mee Jun 13 '17 at 17:18
  • OK, number thing number 2, this code can't handle negative numbers... and I don't exactly know how it could, while (*ptr-- = *neg_str++) doesn't make much sense to me. You're inserting the negative string characters in reverse order. – Jonathan Mee Jun 13 '17 at 18:19
  • So... I've eliminated the memory leak, and corrected the bug with negative numbers: ideone.com/gTv8Z4 Unfortunately there's still an issue with multiple character separators or multiple character negative symbols being written to the string backwards. I'm going to try to solve that next... – Jonathan Mee Jun 13 '17 at 19:23
  • @JonathanMee: I've updated the code (and added at least a few more test cases, including negative numbers). – Jerry Coffin Jun 14 '17 at 6:07

Without recursion or string handling, a mathematical approach:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

void print_number( int n )
{
    int order_of_magnitude = (n == 0) ? 1 : (int)pow( 10, ((int)floor(log10(abs(n))) / 3) * 3 ) ;

    printf( "%d", n / order_of_magnitude ) ;

    for( n = abs( n ) % order_of_magnitude, order_of_magnitude /= 1000;
        order_of_magnitude > 0;
        n %= order_of_magnitude, order_of_magnitude /= 1000 )
    {
        printf( ",%03d", abs(n / order_of_magnitude) ) ;
    }
}

Similar in principle to Pax's recursive solution, but by calculating the order of magnitude in advance, recursion is avoided (at some considerable expense perhaps).

Note also that the actual character used to separate thousands is locale specific.

Edit:See @Chux's comments below for improvements.

  • 1
    Changing abs(n) to fabs(n) prevents 2's compliment error when performing print_number(INT_MIN). – chux Sep 5 '13 at 16:39
  • @chux: Good point, but in the % expression, the LHS would be cast back to an int and it would still be broken. It is simpler perhaps to just accept the marginally smaller range of acceptable input or add a test and output "-2,147,483,647" directly for INT_MIN (or whatever INT_MIN is on the platform in question - therein lies another can of worms. – Clifford Sep 6 '13 at 22:28
  • I did test it successfully before suggesting. Hmmm. I see my idea was only meant for the log10(abs(n)) and not elsewhere. Interestingly, your solution works with the single change to log10(fabs(n)) and print_number(INT_MIN) because of the printf(..., abs(n / order_of_magnitude)) which means n = abs(INT_MIN) % order_of_magnitude being negative is OK. If we give-up on INT_MIN, the printf(..., abs(n / order_of_magnitude)) can become printf(..., n / order_of_magnitude). But I suppose working with that worm called "abs(INT_MIN)" is usually a bad thing. – chux Sep 6 '13 at 23:07
  • New thought: suggest 3 changes log10(fabs(n)), n = abs(n% order_of_magnitude) and printf(",%03d", n/order_of_magnitude). BTW: I would not spend this effort unless I thought you solution was good. No UB, even for INT_MIN. – chux Sep 6 '13 at 23:44

Based on @Greg Hewgill's, but takes negative numbers into account and returns the string size.

size_t str_format_int_grouped(char dst[16], int num)
{
    char src[16];
    char *p_src = src;
    char *p_dst = dst;

    const char separator = ',';
    int num_len, commas;

    num_len = sprintf(src, "%d", num);

    if (*p_src == '-') {
        *p_dst++ = *p_src++;
        num_len--;
    }

    for (commas = 2 - num_len % 3; *p_src; commas = (commas + 1) % 3) {
        *p_dst++ = *p_src++;
        if (commas == 1) {
            *p_dst++ = separator;
        }
    }
    *--p_dst = '\0';

    return (size_t)(p_dst - dst);
}

Another iterative function

int p(int n) {
  if(n < 0) {
    printf("-");
    n = -n;
  }

  int a[sizeof(int) * CHAR_BIT / 3] = { 0 };
  int *pa = a;
  while(n > 0) {
    *++pa = n % 1000;
    n /= 1000;
  }
  printf("%d", *pa);
  while(pa > a + 1) {
    printf(",%03d", *--pa);
  }
}
  • I am intrigued by the expression used to determine the dimension of the array!? Is there at mathematical justification for that? – Clifford Sep 20 '09 at 13:19
  • ld(10) bits for each decimal digit. Round down to 3. we could divide 3 again (to account for the fact that we store up to 3 digit at once). But i wanted to keep it at an upper limit. – Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 20 '09 at 15:11

Here is the slimiest, size and speed efficient implementation of this kind of decimal digit formating:

const char *formatNumber (
    int value,
    char *endOfbuffer,
    bool plus)
{
    int savedValue;
    int charCount;

    savedValue = value;
    if (unlikely (value < 0))
        value = - value;
    *--endOfbuffer = 0;
    charCount = -1;
    do
    {
        if (unlikely (++charCount == 3))
        {
            charCount = 0;
            *--endOfbuffer = ',';
        }

        *--endOfbuffer = (char) (value % 10 + '0');
    }
    while ((value /= 10) != 0);

    if (unlikely (savedValue < 0))
        *--endOfbuffer = '-';
    else if (unlikely (plus))
        *--endOfbuffer = '+';

    return endOfbuffer;
}

Use as following:

char buffer[16];
fprintf (stderr, "test : %s.", formatNumber (1234567890, buffer + 16, true));

Output:

test : +1,234,567,890.

Some advantages:

  • Function taking end of string buffer because of reverse ordered formatting. Finally, where is no need in revering generated string (strrev).

  • This function produces one string that can be used in any algo after. It not depends nor require multiple printf/sprintf calls, which is terrible slow and always context specific.

  • Minimum number of divide operators (/, %).

another solution, by saving the result into an int array, maximum size if 7 because of the long long int can handle number in the range 9,223,372,036,854,775,807 to -9,223,372,036,854,775,807 note it is not an unsigned

non recursive printing function

static void printNumber (int numbers[8], int loc, int negative)
{
    if (negative)
    {
        printf("-");
    }
    if (numbers[1]==-1)//one number
    {
        printf("%d ", numbers[0]);
    }
    else
    {
        printf("%d,", numbers[loc]);
        while(loc--)
        {
            if(loc==0)
            {// last number
                printf("%03d ", numbers[loc]);
                break;
            }
            else
            { // number in between
                printf("%03d,", numbers[loc]);
            }
        }
    }
}

main function call

static void getNumWcommas (long long int n, int numbers[8])
{
    int i;
    int negative=0;
    if (n < 0)
    {
        negative = 1;
        n = -n;
    }
    for(i = 0; i<7; i++)
    {
        if (n < 1000)
        {
            numbers[i] = n;
            numbers[i+1] = -1;
            break;
        }
        numbers[i] = n%1000;
        n/=1000;
    }

    printNumber(numbers, i, negative);// non recursive print
}

testing output

-9223372036854775807: -9,223,372,036,854,775,807
-1234567890         : -1,234,567,890
-123456             : -123,456
-12345              : -12,345
-1000               : -1,000
-999                : -999
-1                  : -1
0                   : 0
1                   : 1
999                 : 999
1000                : 1,000
12345               : 12,345
123456              : 123,456
1234567890          : 1,234,567,890
9223372036854775807 : 9,223,372,036,854,775,807

in main() class

int numberSeperated[8];
long long int number = 1234567890LL;
getNumWcommas(number, numberSeperated );

if printing is all needed then move int numberSeperated[8]; inside the function getNumWcommas and call it this way getNumWcommas(number);

My answer does not format the result exactly like the illustration in the question, but may fulfill the actual need in some cases with a simple one-liner or macro. One can extend it to generate more thousand-groups as necessary.

The result will look for example as follows:

Value: 0'000'012'345

The code:

printf("Value: %llu'%03lu'%03lu'%03lu\n", (value / 1000 / 1000 / 1000), (value / 1000 / 1000) % 1000, (value / 1000) % 1000, value % 1000);

Secure format_commas, with negative numbers:

Because VS < 2015 doesn't implement snprintf, you need to do this

#if defined(_WIN32)
    #define snprintf(buf,len, format,...) _snprintf_s(buf, len,len, format, __VA_ARGS__)
#endif

And then

char* format_commas(int n, char *out)
{
    int c;
    char buf[100];
    char *p;
    char* q = out; // Backup pointer for return...

    if (n < 0)
    {
        *out++ = '-';
        n = abs(n);
    }


    snprintf(buf, 100, "%d", n);
    c = 2 - strlen(buf) % 3;

    for (p = buf; *p != 0; p++) {
        *out++ = *p;
        if (c == 1) {
            *out++ = '\'';
        }
        c = (c + 1) % 3;
    }
    *--out = 0;

    return q;
}

Example usage:

size_t currentSize = getCurrentRSS();
size_t peakSize = getPeakRSS();


printf("Current size: %d\n", currentSize);
printf("Peak size: %d\n\n\n", peakSize);

char* szcurrentSize = (char*)malloc(100 * sizeof(char));
char* szpeakSize = (char*)malloc(100 * sizeof(char));

printf("Current size (f): %s\n", format_commas((int)currentSize, szcurrentSize));
printf("Peak size (f): %s\n", format_commas((int)currentSize, szpeakSize));

free(szcurrentSize);
free(szpeakSize);

There's no real simple way to do this in C. I would just modify an int-to-string function to do it:

void format_number(int n, char * out) {
    int i;
    int digit;
    int out_index = 0;

    for (i = n; i != 0; i /= 10) {
        digit = i % 10;

        if ((out_index + 1) % 4 == 0) {
            out[out_index++] = ',';
        }
        out[out_index++] = digit + '0';
    }
    out[out_index] = '\0';

    // then you reverse the out string as it was converted backwards (it's easier that way).
    // I'll let you figure that one out.
    strrev(out);
}

A modified version of @paxdiablo solution, but using WCHAR and wsprinf:

static WCHAR buffer[10];
static int pos = 0;

void printfcomma(const int &n) {
    if (n < 0) {
        wsprintf(buffer + pos, TEXT("-"));
        pos = lstrlen(buffer);
        printfcomma(-n);
        return;
    }
    if (n < 1000) {
        wsprintf(buffer + pos, TEXT("%d"), n);
        pos = lstrlen(buffer);
        return;
    }
    printfcomma(n / 1000);
    wsprintf(buffer + pos, TEXT(",%03d"), n % 1000);
    pos = lstrlen(buffer);
}

void my_sprintf(const int &n)
{
    pos = 0;
    printfcomma(n);
}

I'm new in C programming. Here is my simple code.

int main()
{
    //  1223 => 1,223
    int n;
    int a[10];
    printf(" n: ");
    scanf_s("%d", &n);
    int i = 0;
    while (n > 0)
    {
        int temp = n % 1000;
        a[i] = temp;
        n /= 1000;
        i++;
    }
    for (int j = i - 1; j >= 0; j--)
    {
        if (j == 0) 
        {
            printf("%d.", a[j]);
        }
        else printf("%d,",a[j]);
    }
    getch();
    return 0;
}
#include <stdio.h>

void punt(long long n){
    char s[28];
    int i = 27;
    if(n<0){n=-n; putchar('-');} 
    do{
        s[i--] = n%10 + '0';
        if(!(i%4) && n>9)s[i--]='.';
        n /= 10;
    }while(n);
    puts(&s[++i]);
}


int main(){
    punt(2134567890);
    punt(987);
    punt(9876);
    punt(-987);
    punt(-9876);
    punt(-654321);
    punt(0);
    punt(1000000000);
    punt(0x7FFFFFFFFFFFFFFF);
    punt(0x8000000000000001); // -max + 1 ...
}

My solution uses a . instead of a , It is left to the reader to change this.

Can be done pretty easily...

//Make sure output buffer is big enough and that input is a valid null terminated string
void pretty_number(const char* input, char * output)
{
    int iInputLen = strlen(input);
    int iOutputBufferPos = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < iInputLen; i++)
    {
        if((iInputLen-i) % 3 == 0 && i != 0)
        {
            output[iOutputBufferPos++] = ',';
        }

        output[iOutputBufferPos++] = input[i];
    }

    output[iOutputBufferPos] = '\0';
}

Example call:

char szBuffer[512];
pretty_number("1234567", szBuffer);
//strcmp(szBuffer, "1,234,567") == 0
void printfcomma ( long long unsigned int n) 
{

    char nstring[100];
     int m;
      int ptr;
       int i,j;


    sprintf(nstring,"%llu",n);
      m=strlen(nstring);

     ptr=m%3;
       if (ptr)
        {   for (i=0;i<ptr;i++)       // print first digits before comma
              printf("%c", nstring[i]); 
           printf(",");
         }
     j=0; 
     for (i=ptr;i<m;i++)      // print the rest inserting commas
          {
            printf("%c",nstring[i]);
            j++;
            if (j%3==0)
              if(i<(m-1)) printf(",");
           }

}
  • 1
    At least use proper indentation when posting code. Also perhaps add some explanation on what this does that existing answers don't do yet. – EWit Jul 12 '14 at 15:20
  • This has the virtue of simplicity and is easily understood at a glance. – steve newman Jul 15 '14 at 4:10
  • 1
    Bogus solution, prints an extra , for numbers below 100, uses printf() where putchar() would fly, uses misleading names, chaotic indentation and far too much code. – chqrlie Apr 24 '15 at 23:03
        // separate thousands
        int digit;
        int idx = 0;
        static char buffer[32];
        char* p = &buffer[32];

        *--p = '\0';
        for (int i = fCounter; i != 0; i /= 10)
        {
            digit = i % 10;

            if ((p - buffer) % 4 == 0)
                *--p = ' ';

            *--p = digit + '0';
        }
  • 1
    This code has a variety of problems. The unused variable idx could go. The code doesn't produce anything for 0. It doesn't handle negative numbers. There's no obvious reason to make buffer a static variable (it limits the reentrancy of the code). There's no explanation of what it does, or mention that after the code is complete, the string pointed at by p contains the formatted string. The least serious problem is that it uses blank instead of comma as the thousands separator. The fact that it doesn't handle zero is the killer problem, though. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 26 '15 at 18:24

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