41
SELECT col1,
       col2,
       col3,

EXEC GetAIntFromStoredProc(T.col1) AS col4
     FROM Tbl AS T
     WHERE (col2 = @parm) 

How to write this SQL query in SQL Server 2008?

  • 6
    You should look at functions, you cannot call a stored procedure from within a select query. – twoleggedhorse Jan 24 '13 at 17:13
  • 1
    select col1, col2, col3, EXEC GetAIntFromStoredProc(t.col1) as col4 FROM tbl as t where (col2 = @parm) IS NOT select col1, col2 FROM EXEC MyStoredProc 'param1', 'param2'. this is not a duplicate, tried editing but was rejected, the answer in this post is correct – Iván Quiñones Apr 9 '16 at 14:43
38

Thanks @twoleggedhorse.

Here is the solution.

  1. First we created a function

    CREATE FUNCTION GetAIntFromStoredProc(@parm Nvarchar(50)) RETURNS INTEGER
    
    AS
    BEGIN
       DECLARE @id INTEGER
    
       set @id= (select TOP(1) id From tbl where col=@parm)
    
       RETURN @id
    END
    
  2. then we do the select query

    Select col1, col2, col3,
    GetAIntFromStoredProc(T.col1) As col4
    From Tbl as T
    Where col2=@parm
    
  • 52
    But that is not storedd procedure anymore... – levi Feb 11 '15 at 11:07
  • 22
    Exactly. The correct answer should have been "not possible". – Tundey Apr 15 '16 at 12:12
  • 3
    This is not the answer to the literal question posed regarding procedures. It's an alternate solution with huge limitations. See my actual answer. – BuvinJ May 12 '17 at 21:57
  • 1
    How can this be a solution to your question you just converted the stored proc to a function :/ – univ May 31 '17 at 21:47
  • What if the store procedure has the dynamic queries to execute? It wont work with function. – Mahavir Kumbharvadia Apr 17 at 9:51
28

Functions are easy to call inside a select loop, but they don't let you run inserts, updates, deletes, etc. They are only useful for query operations. You need a stored procedure to manipulate the data.

So, the real answer to this question is that you must iterate through the results of a select statement via a "cursor" and call the procedure from within that loop. Here's an example:

DECLARE @myId int;
DECLARE @myName nvarchar(60);
DECLARE myCursor CURSOR FORWARD_ONLY FOR
    SELECT Id, Name FROM SomeTable;
OPEN myCursor;
FETCH NEXT FROM myCursor INTO @myId, @myName;
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0 BEGIN
    EXECUTE dbo.myCustomProcedure @myId, @myName;
    FETCH NEXT FROM myCursor INTO @myId, @myName;
END;
CLOSE myCursor;
DEALLOCATE myCursor;

Note that @@FETCH_STATUS is a standard variable which gets updated for you. The rest of the object names here are custom.

4

As long as you're not doing any INSERT or UPDATE statements in your stored procedure, you will probably want to make it a function.

Stored procedures are for executing by an outside program, or on a timed interval.

The answers here will explain it better than I can:

Function vs. Stored Procedure in SQL Server

  • A stored procedure CAN be used "for executing by an outside program, or on a timed interval.", but they are in no way limited to that, or intended only for those purposes. Scripts are written all the time to be run in a stand alone, on demand context for data manipulation. – BuvinJ Feb 23 '18 at 15:49
0

You can create a temp table matching your proc output and insert into it.

CREATE TABLE #Temp (
    Col1 INT
)

INSERT INTO #Temp
    EXEC MyProc

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