1

I have a dataframe, Call it A, that looks something like this:

GroupID  Dist1   Dist2 ...
1        4       4 
1        5       4 
1        3       16 
2        0       4 
2        7       2 
2        8       0 
2        6       4 
2        7       4 
2        8       2 
3        7       4 
3        5       6
...

GroupID is a factor, Dist1, Dist2 are integers.

I have a derived dataframe, SummaryA

GroupID  AveD1  AveD2 ...
1        4       8 
2        6       2
3        6       5
...

For each groupID, I need to find the ROW NUMBER that has the minimum, to do further manipulation, and to extract data to my summary set. For instance, I need:

GroupID  MinRowD1  
1        1 
2        4 
3        11 

On matches, it doesn't matter which I choose, but I'm stuck as to how I get this. I can't use which(), because it doesn't operate over factors nicely, I can't use ave(Fun=min), because I need the location, not the minimum value. If I do something with matching to the minimum for each group, I can have multiple matches, which screws stuff up.

Any suggestions for how to do this?

  • You'll have to convert to numeric via as.numeric(as.character(x)) to use which (which should a pretty safe bet). – Roman Luštrik Jan 24 '13 at 17:15
  • But that doesn't get me the row number. I can find the rows that are minimums, but I get multiple matches. – David Manheim Jan 24 '13 at 17:16
  • 1
    Give us some reproducible code to work with, and we'll sort out multiple matches as well. – Roman Luštrik Jan 24 '13 at 17:16
  • @James -Does which.min work over factors? It seems like it does not. – David Manheim Jan 24 '13 at 17:21
  • @DavidManheim Are Dist1 and Dist2 factors? – James Jan 24 '13 at 17:23
5

Here's a base R solution; the basic idea is to split the data by GroupID, get the row with the minimum value for each, and then put it back together. Some think the plyr functions are a more intuitive way to do this; I'm sure a solution using one of them will appear shortly...

A$row <- 1:nrow(A)
As <- split(A, A$GroupID)
sapply(As, function(Ai) {Ai$row[which.min(Ai$Dist1)]})

For large data sets, split is faster when performed on a scalar, not a data frame, like this.

rows <- split(1:nrow(A), A$GroupID)
sapply(rows, function(rowi) {rowi[which.min(A$Dist1[rowi])]})
  • 3
    I like this in theory, but split takes a very long time with 32,000 factor values. – David Manheim Jan 24 '13 at 17:58
  • In general, if you find yourself using split followed immediately by sapply or lapply, you're better off using by. – Señor O Jan 24 '13 at 18:28
  • 1
    @DavidManheim: Yes, it definitely would. Speed would depend on both how many total rows and how many unique factor values. Also, putting the size of the data frame in your question would give better answers. – Aaron left Stack Overflow Jan 24 '13 at 18:29
  • @SeñorO: Perhaps, yes. But it's one more syntax for me to remember, and I feel I have better control over the output this way. Perhaps my own idiosyncrasies, though; I really don't know by very well. – Aaron left Stack Overflow Jan 24 '13 at 18:31
  • Sure, it's a constant battle in R between sticking with things you know you have control over and trying to learn things that may or may not make tasks easier. by essentially splits up a data.frame by factors and passes those subsets on to a function, in the format: by(DF, DF$Factor, function(X) DoStuffTo(X)) and returns a list. – Señor O Jan 24 '13 at 18:36
7

Using by and rownames of your data

> dat$row <- 1:nrow(dat)
>  by(dat,dat$GroupID,FUN = function(x) rownames(x)[which.min(x$Dist1)])
dat$GroupID: 1
[1] "3"
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
dat$GroupID: 2
[1] "4"
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
dat$GroupID: 3
[1] "11"

here I assume dat

dat <- read.table(text = 'GroupID  Dist1   Dist2
1        4       4 
1        5       4 
1        3       16 
2        0       4 
2        7       2 
2        8       0 
2        6       4 
2        7       4 
2        8       2 
3        7       4 
3        5       6', header = T)

EDIT Another solution using data.table package

I think data.table offer more elegant solution :

library(data.table)

dat$row <- 1:nrow(dat)
dtb <- as.data.table (dat)
dtb [,.SD[which.min(Dist1)],by=c('GroupID')]
   GroupID Dist1 Dist2 row
1:       1     3    16   3
2:       2     0     4   4
3:       3     5     6  11

Edit1 row table without creating the row column (@Arun comment)

dtb[, {i = which.min(Dist1); list(Dist1=Dist1[i], 
    Dist2=Dist2[i], rowNew=.I[i])}, by=GroupID]

  GroupID Dist1 Dist2 rowNew
1:       1     3    16   3
2:       2     0     4   4
3:       3     5     6  11
  • 1
    @Arun good ! I will update my solution! You becomes a data.table proficient! – agstudy Jan 24 '13 at 18:41
3

Assuming dat from @agstudy's Answer, then aggregate() is a nice base function that can easily do what you want. (This Answer uses which.min(), which has interesting behaviour in the presence of more than one value that takes the minimum value within the input vector. See the Warning at the end!). For example

aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat, FUN = which.min)

> aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat, FUN = which.min)
  GroupID Dist1 Dist2
1       1     3     1
2       2     1     3
3       3     2     1

gets the rows ids, or to get the rownames we could do this (after adding some rownames to the example):

rownames(dat) <- letters[seq_len(nrow(dat))] ## add rownames for effect

## function, pull out for clarity
foo <- function(x, rn) rn[which.min(x)]
## apply via aggregate
aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat, FUN = foo,
          rn = rownames(dat))

which gives

>     rownames(dat) <- letters[seq_len(nrow(dat))] ## add rownames for effect
> 
>     ## function, pull out for clarity
>     foo <- function(x, rn) rn[which.min(x)]
>     ## apply via aggregate
>     aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat, FUN = foo,
+               rn = rownames(dat))
  GroupID Dist1 Dist2
1       1     c     a
2       2     a     c
3       3     b     a

I find aggregate() gives nicer output than by() and the formula interface (whilst not the most efficient way to use it) is certainly very intuitive.

Warning

which.min() is great if there aren't duplicate values at the minimum. If there are, which.min() selects the first of the values with minimum value. Alternatively, there is the which(x == min(x)) idiom, but then any solution needs to handle the fact that there are duplicate minimum values.

dat2 <- dat
dat2 <- rbind(dat2, data.frame(GroupID = 1, Dist1 = 3, Dist2 = 8))

aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat2, FUN = which.min)

which misses the duplicates.

> aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat2, FUN = which.min)
  GroupID Dist1 Dist2
1       1     3     1
2       2     1     3
3       3     2     1

Contrast that with the which(x == min(x)) idiom:

out <- aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat2,
          FUN = function(x) which(x == min(x)))
> (out <- aggregate(cbind(Dist1, Dist2) ~ GroupID, data = dat2,
+                   FUN = function(x) which(x == min(x))))
  GroupID Dist1 Dist2
1       1  3, 4  1, 2
2       2     1     3
3       3     2     1

Whilst thae output using which(x == min(x)) is appealing, the object itself is somewhat more complex, being a data frame with lists as components:

> str(out)
'data.frame':   3 obs. of  3 variables:
 $ GroupID: num  1 2 3
 $ Dist1  :List of 3
  ..$ 0: int  3 4
  ..$ 1: int 1
  ..$ 2: int 2
 $ Dist2  :List of 3
  ..$ 0: int  1 2
  ..$ 1: int 3
  ..$ 2: int 1
2

Assume dFrame contains your data

 install.packages('plyr')
 library('plyr')

try this:

 dFrame$GroupID<-as.numeric(dFrame$GroupID) ## casting to numeric type
 dFrame<-arrange(dFrame,Dist1) ## sorting the frame by Dist1 to find min by Dist1
 dFrame$row_name<-1:nrow(dFrame) ## will use this to pick out the index

 newFrame<-data.frame(GroupID = unique(dFrame$GroupID), MinRowD1 = as.numeric(tapply(dFrame$row_name,dFrame$GroupID,FUN = function(x){return (x[1])})
  • This looks promising. I will play around with it. Thanks! – David Manheim Jan 24 '13 at 17:27
  • You clearly needed to assign the row names before sorting, but otherwise this looks good so far. – David Manheim Jan 24 '13 at 17:32
  • @DavidManheim i did that to make code comprehension simpler. you could have simply done row.names(dFrame)<-1:nrow(dFrame); and then passed as.numeric(row.names(dFrame)) to the tapply call – Aditya Sihag Jan 24 '13 at 17:35
1

Slightly convoluted, but this should do the trick:

x <- data.frame(GroupID=rep(1:3,each=3),Dist1=rpois(9,5))
x
  GroupID Dist1
1       1    10
2       1     5
3       1     3
4       2     9
5       2     9
6       2    13
7       3    10
8       3    10
9       3     4
sapply(lapply(lapply(split(x,x$GroupID),
    function(y) y[order(y[2]),]),head,1),rownames)
  1   2   3 
"3" "4" "9"
0

This will return the rownames from both columns associated with the first minimum in each group. And it returns them as a dataframe with named columns:

do.call(rbind, 
   by(dat,dat$GroupID,FUN = function(x) c(
                               minD1=rownames(x)[which.min(x[['Dist1']])], 
                               minD2=rownames(x)[which.min(x[['Dist2']])] ) ) )
#-------------
  minD1 minD2
1 "3"   "1"  
2 "4"   "6"  
3 "11"  "10" 

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