282

Suppose I had a string:

string str = "1111222233334444";

How can I break this string into chunks of some size?

E.g., breaking this into sizes of 4 would return strings:

"1111"
"2222"
"3333"
"4444"
9
  • 19
    Why use LINQ or regexes when C#'s standard string manipulation functions can do this with less effort and more speed? Also, what happens if the string is an odd number of characters in length?
    – Ian Kemp
    Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 10:58
  • 8
    "I'd like to avoid loops" - why? Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 11:02
  • 12
    Using a simple loop is definitely what gives the best performance.
    – Guffa
    Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 11:23
  • 5
    nichesoftware.co.nz/blog/200909/linq-vs-loop-performance is a pretty good comparison between linq and actual looping over an array. I doubt you'll ever find linq faster than manually written code because it keeps calling run-time delegates that are hard to optimize away. Linq is more fun though :)
    – Blindy
    Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 11:26
  • 2
    Whether you're using LINQ or regexes, the loop is still there. Commented Sep 21, 2009 at 6:54

39 Answers 39

304
static IEnumerable<string> Split(string str, int chunkSize)
{
    return Enumerable.Range(0, str.Length / chunkSize)
        .Select(i => str.Substring(i * chunkSize, chunkSize));
}

Please note that additional code might be required to gracefully handle edge cases (null or empty input string, chunkSize == 0, input string length not divisible by chunkSize, etc.). The original question doesn't specify any requirements for these edge cases and in real life the requirements might vary so they are out of scope of this answer.

19
  • 3
    @Harry Good catch! This can be remedied with a drop-in ternary expression on the count parameter of substring. Something like: (i * chunkSize + chunkSize <= str.Length) ? chunkSize : str.Length - i * chunkSize. An additional problem is that this function doesn't account for str being null. This can be fixed by wrapping the whole return statement in another ternary expression: (str != null) ? ... : Enumerable.Empty<String>();. Commented Jul 4, 2012 at 16:49
  • 10
    This was close, but unlike the previous 30 upvoters, I had to change the loop count limit of Range from str.Length / chunkSize to double length = str.Length; double size = chunkSize; int count = (int)Math.Ceiling(length/size); return Enumerable.Range(0, count)...
    – gap
    Commented Aug 25, 2012 at 1:25
  • 8
    @KonstantinSpirin I agree if the code worked. It only handles the case where a string is a multiple of chunkSize, the rest of the string is lost. Please ammend. Also keep in mind that LINQ and it's magic is not as easy to understand to someone that just wants to look at a solution to this problem. A person must now understand what the Enumerable.Range() and .Select() functions do. I will not argue that you should have an understanding of that to write C#/.NET code as these functions have been in the BCL for many years now. Commented Jan 2, 2013 at 22:33
  • 6
    Topic starter said in comments that StringLength % 4 will always be 0. If Linq is not as easy to understand then there are other answers that use loops and yields. Anyone is free to choose the solution she likes best. You can post your code as an answer and people will happily vote for it. Commented Jan 3, 2013 at 1:42
  • 9
    Enumerable.Range(0, (str.Length + chunkSize - 1) / chunkSize) .Select(i => str.Substring(i * chunkSize, Math.Min(str.Length - i * chunkSize, chunkSize))) Commented Nov 9, 2017 at 19:11
180

In a combination of dove's and Konstatin's answers...

static IEnumerable<string> WholeChunks(string str, int chunkSize) {
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i += chunkSize)
        yield return str.Substring(i, chunkSize);
}

This will work for all strings that can be split into a whole number of chunks, and will throw an exception otherwise.

If you want to support strings of any length you could use the following code:

static IEnumerable<string> ChunksUpto(string str, int maxChunkSize) {
    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i += maxChunkSize)
        yield return str.Substring(i, Math.Min(maxChunkSize, str.Length-i));
}

However, the the OP explicitly stated he does not need this; it's somewhat longer and harder to read, slightly slower. In the spirit of KISS and YAGNI, I'd go with the first option: it's probably the most efficient implementation possible, and it's very short, readable, and, importantly, throws an exception for nonconforming input.

13
  • 4
    +1 worth a nod. kinda hits nail upon head. he's looking for succinct sytnax and you're also giving the (probably) better performance.
    – dove
    Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 20:28
  • 9
    And if you make it "static ... Chunk(this string str, int chunkSize) {" you even have one more "new" C#-Feature into it. Then you can write "1111222233334444".Chunk(4). Commented Sep 21, 2009 at 7:25
  • 1
    @MartinStettner: That's certainly a decent idea if this is a common operation. Commented Sep 21, 2009 at 8:05
  • You should only include the latter code. The former requires that you understand and test for the string being a multiple of chunk size prior to using, or understand that it will not return the remainder of the string. Commented Jan 2, 2013 at 22:37
  • The OP's question doesn't make it clear whether he needs that functionality. The first solution is simpler, faster and reliably fails with an exception iff the string cannot be evenly split into the specified chunk size. I agree that returning "wrong" results would be bad, but that not what it does - it just throws an exception, so I'd be OK with using it if you can live with the limitation. Commented Jan 3, 2013 at 10:08
64

Use loops. Here's something that would do it quite well:

string str = "111122223333444455";
int chunkSize = 4;
int stringLength = str.Length;
for (int i = 0; i < stringLength ; i += chunkSize)
{
    if (i + chunkSize > stringLength) chunkSize = stringLength  - i;
    Console.WriteLine(str.Substring(i, chunkSize));
}

Console.ReadLine();

I don't know how you'd deal with case where the string is not factor of 4, but I am not saying you're idea is not possible, just wondering the motivation for it if a simple for loop does it very well. Obviously the above could be cleaned up and even put in as an extension method.

Or as mentioned in comments, you know it's /4 then

str = "1111222233334444";
for (int i = 0; i < stringLength; i += chunkSize)
{
    Console.WriteLine(str.Substring(i, chunkSize));
}
6
  • 1
    You can pull int chunkSize = 4 outside of the loop. It will only be modified on the final pass. Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 11:15
  • +1 for a simple and effective solution - this is how I would have done it, although I would've used i += chunkSize instead.
    – Ian Kemp
    Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 13:19
  • Probably a minor quibble, but you should probably also pull the str.Length out of the loop and into a local variable. The C# optimizer may be able to inline array length, but I think the code as written will do a method call on every loop, which is not efficient, since the size of str never changes. Commented Sep 21, 2009 at 0:47
  • @Daniel, put your idea in there. though I'm not sure that this wouldn't be calculated at runtime, but that's another question ;)
    – dove
    Commented Sep 21, 2009 at 6:46
  • @Daniel coming back to this, pretty sure the that this optimisation would be extracted by the compiler.
    – dove
    Commented Oct 29, 2009 at 0:09
50

Starting with .NET 6, we can also use the Chunk method:

var result = str
    .Chunk(4)
    .Select(x => new string(x))
    .ToList();
0
49

This is based on dove's solution, but implemented as an extension method.

Benefits:

  • Extension method
  • Covers corner cases
  • Splits string with any chars: numbers, letters, other symbols

Code

public static class EnumerableEx
{
    public static IEnumerable<string> SplitBy(this string str, int chunkLength)
    {
        if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(str)) throw new ArgumentException();
        if (chunkLength < 1) throw new ArgumentException();

        for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i += chunkLength)
        {
            if (chunkLength + i > str.Length)
                chunkLength = str.Length - i;

            yield return str.Substring(i, chunkLength);
        }
    }
}

Usage

var result = "bobjoecat".SplitBy(3); // bob, joe, cat

Unit tests removed for brevity (see the previous revision).

4
  • Interesting solution, but for the sake of avoiding checks beyond null on the input, it seems more logical to allow an empty string to just return a single empty-string part: if (str.Length == 0) yield return String.Empty; else { for... }
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 9:47
  • I mean, that's how the normal String.Split handles empty strings; it returns one empty-string entry.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 10:00
  • Side note: your usage example is wrong. You can't just cast IEnumerable to array, especially not implicitly.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 10:12
  • I personally like to call that method Chunkify.. It's not mine, I don't remember where I have seen that name, but it felt very nice to me Commented Feb 14, 2018 at 11:52
46

Using regular expressions and LINQ:

List<string> groups = (from Match m in Regex.Matches(str, @"\d{4}")
                       select m.Value).ToList();

I find this to be more readable, but it's just a personal opinion. It can also be a one-liner : ).

4
  • 7
    Change the pattern to @"\d{1,4}" and it works for any string length. :)
    – Guffa
    Commented Sep 20, 2009 at 18:08
  • 3
    +1 Though this is slower than the other solutions, it's definitely very readable. It's not clear to me whether the OP requires digits or arbitrary characters; it'd probably be wise to replace the \d character class with a . and to specify RegexOptions.Singleline. Commented Sep 23, 2009 at 14:27
  • 4
    or just Regex.Matches(s, @"\d{1,4}").Select(m => m.Value).ToList(); I never got the point of this alternative syntax that serves only to obfuscate that we're using extension methods.
    – The Dag
    Commented Dec 1, 2015 at 6:56
  • FYI, regexes have gotten way faster in recent versions of .NET Commented Apr 18 at 19:00
27

Use this for a one-liner:

List<string> result = new List<string>(Regex.Split(target, @"(?<=\G.{4})", RegexOptions.Singleline));

With this regex it doesn't matter if the last chunk is less than four characters, because it only ever looks at the characters behind it.

I'm sure this isn't the most efficient solution, but I just had to toss it out there.

1
  • in case of target.Lenght % ChunckSize == 0 that returns a additional empty row e.g List<string> result = new List<string>(Regex.Split("fooo", @"(?<=\G.{4})", RegexOptions.Singleline));
    – fubo
    Commented Sep 4, 2015 at 7:28
9

It's not pretty and it's not fast, but it works, it's a one-liner and it's LINQy:

List<string> a = text.Select((c, i) => new { Char = c, Index = i }).GroupBy(o => o.Index / 4).Select(g => new String(g.Select(o => o.Char).ToArray())).ToList();
2
  • Is it guaranteed that GroupBy preserves order of elements? Commented Sep 21, 2009 at 1:21
  • ToCharArray is unnecessary since string is IEnumerable<char>.
    – juharr
    Commented Nov 17, 2015 at 16:11
8

I recently had to write something that accomplishes this at work, so I thought I would post my solution to this problem. As an added bonus, the functionality of this solution provides a way to split the string in the opposite direction and it does correctly handle Unicode characters as previously mentioned by Marvin Pinto. So, here it is:

using System;
using Extensions;

namespace TestCSharp
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string asciiStr = "This is a string.";
            string unicodeStr = "これは文字列です。";

            string[] array1 = asciiStr.Split(4);
            string[] array2 = asciiStr.Split(-4);

            string[] array3 = asciiStr.Split(7);
            string[] array4 = asciiStr.Split(-7);

            string[] array5 = unicodeStr.Split(5);
            string[] array6 = unicodeStr.Split(-5);
        }
    }
}

namespace Extensions
{
    public static class StringExtensions
    {
        /// <summary>Returns a string array that contains the substrings in this string that are seperated a given fixed length.</summary>
        /// <param name="s">This string object.</param>
        /// <param name="length">Size of each substring.
        ///     <para>CASE: length &gt; 0 , RESULT: String is split from left to right.</para>
        ///     <para>CASE: length == 0 , RESULT: String is returned as the only entry in the array.</para>
        ///     <para>CASE: length &lt; 0 , RESULT: String is split from right to left.</para>
        /// </param>
        /// <returns>String array that has been split into substrings of equal length.</returns>
        /// <example>
        ///     <code>
        ///         string s = "1234567890";
        ///         string[] a = s.Split(4); // a == { "1234", "5678", "90" }
        ///     </code>
        /// </example>
        public static string[] Split(this string s, int length)
        {
            System.Globalization.StringInfo str = new System.Globalization.StringInfo(s);

            int lengthAbs = Math.Abs(length);

            if (str == null || str.LengthInTextElements == 0 || lengthAbs == 0 || str.LengthInTextElements <= lengthAbs)
                return new string[] { str.ToString() };

            string[] array = new string[(str.LengthInTextElements % lengthAbs == 0 ? str.LengthInTextElements / lengthAbs: (str.LengthInTextElements / lengthAbs) + 1)];

            if (length > 0)
                for (int iStr = 0, iArray = 0; iStr < str.LengthInTextElements && iArray < array.Length; iStr += lengthAbs, iArray++)
                    array[iArray] = str.SubstringByTextElements(iStr, (str.LengthInTextElements - iStr < lengthAbs ? str.LengthInTextElements - iStr : lengthAbs));
            else // if (length < 0)
                for (int iStr = str.LengthInTextElements - 1, iArray = array.Length - 1; iStr >= 0 && iArray >= 0; iStr -= lengthAbs, iArray--)
                    array[iArray] = str.SubstringByTextElements((iStr - lengthAbs < 0 ? 0 : iStr - lengthAbs + 1), (iStr - lengthAbs < 0 ? iStr + 1 : lengthAbs));

            return array;
        }
    }
}

Also, here is an image link to the results of running this code: https://i.sstatic.net/Fh3Ym.png

3
  • 1
    I noticed a problem with this code. You have {str.ToString()} at the end of your first IF statement. Are you sure you didn't mean str.String? I had a problem with the code above, made that change, and everything worked.
    – gunr2171
    Commented Jun 19, 2012 at 20:53
  • @gunr2171 It seems that if str == null, that line will also give a NullReferenceException. Commented Apr 9, 2020 at 16:32
  • Re "by Marvin Pinto": Do you mean "by Seth"? Commented Nov 2, 2023 at 16:14
6

You can use morelinq by Jon Skeet. Use Batch like:

string str = "1111222233334444";
int chunkSize = 4;
var chunks = str.Batch(chunkSize).Select(r => new String(r.ToArray()));

This will return 4 chunks for the string "1111222233334444". If the string length is less than or equal to the chunk size Batch will return the string as the only element of IEnumerable<string>

For output:

foreach (var chunk in chunks)
{
    Console.WriteLine(chunk);
}

and it will give:

1111
2222
3333
4444
1
  • 2
    Among the authors of MoreLINQ I see Jonathan Skeet, but no Jon Skeet. So did you mean the Jon Skeet, or what? ;-) Commented Jul 23, 2017 at 8:21
6

Personally I prefer my solution :-)

It handles:

  • String lengths that are a multiple of the chunk size.
  • String lengths that are not a multiple of the chunk size.
  • String lengths that are smaller than the chunk size.
  • NULL and empty strings (throws an exception).
  • Chunk sizes smaller than 1 (throws an exception).

It is implemented as a extension method, and it calculates the number of chunks is going to generate beforehand. It checks the last chunk because in case the text length is not a multiple it needs to be shorter. Clean, short, easy to understand... and works!

public static string[] Split(this string value, int chunkSize)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
        throw new ArgumentException("The string cannot be null.");
    if (chunkSize < 1)
        throw new ArgumentException("The chunk size should be equal or greater than one.");

    int remainder;
    int divResult = Math.DivRem(value.Length, chunkSize, out remainder);

    int numberOfChunks = remainder > 0 ? divResult + 1 : divResult;
    var result = new string[numberOfChunks];

    int i = 0;
    while (i < numberOfChunks - 1)
    {
        result[i] = value.Substring(i * chunkSize, chunkSize);
        i++;
    }

    int lastChunkSize = remainder > 0 ? remainder : chunkSize;
    result[i] = value.Substring(i * chunkSize, lastChunkSize);

    return result;
}
0
5

This should be much faster and more efficient than using LINQ or other approaches used here.

public static IEnumerable<string> Splice(this string s, int spliceLength)
{
    if (s == null)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("s");
    if (spliceLength < 1)
        throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("spliceLength");

    if (s.Length == 0)
        yield break;
    var start = 0;
    for (var end = spliceLength; end < s.Length; end += spliceLength)
    {
        yield return s.Substring(start, spliceLength);
        start = end;
    }
    yield return s.Substring(start);
}
1
  • 1
    This looks like it does early checking, but it doesn't. You don't get an error until you begin enumerating the enumerable. You need to break up your function into two parts, where the first part does the argument checking, and then returns the results of the second, private part that does the enumeration.
    – ErikE
    Commented Oct 27, 2015 at 1:32
5

Simple and short:

// This means match a space or not a space
// (anything) up to 4 characters
var lines =
    Regex.Matches(
        str, 
        @"[\s\S]{0,4}").Cast<Match>().Select(x => x.Value);
1
  • Why not use .?
    – marsze
    Commented Sep 21, 2017 at 11:20
5

Here is an Rx implementation. It handles the length % chunkSize != 0 problem out of the box:

public static IEnumerable<string> Chunkify(this string input, int size)
{
    if(size < 1)
        throw new ArgumentException("size must be greater than 0");

    return input.ToCharArray()
        .ToObservable()
        .Buffer(size)
        .Select(x => new string(x.ToArray()))
        .ToEnumerable();
}
2
4
static IEnumerable<string> Split(string str, int chunkSize)
{
   IEnumerable<string> retVal = Enumerable.Range(0, str.Length / chunkSize)
        .Select(i => str.Substring(i * chunkSize, chunkSize))

   if (str.Length % chunkSize > 0)
        retVal = retVal.Append(str.Substring(str.Length / chunkSize * chunkSize, str.Length % chunkSize));

   return retVal;
}

It correctly handles input string length not divisible by chunkSize.

Please note that additional code might be required to gracefully handle edge cases (null or empty input string, chunkSize == 0).

0
4

The best, easiest and generic answer :).

string originalString = "1111222233334444";
List<string> test = new List<string>();
int chunkSize = 4; // Change 4 with the size of strings you want.
for (int i = 0; i < originalString.Length; i = i + chunkSize)
{
    if (originalString.Length - i >= chunkSize)
        test.Add(originalString.Substring(i, chunkSize));
    else
        test.Add(originalString.Substring(i,((originalString.Length - i))));
}
3
  • Calculating the length in the last line is redundant, simply use the Substring overload that doesn't require the length parameter originalString.Substring(i). Also you can use > instead of >= in your check. Commented Aug 11, 2018 at 6:03
  • @RacilHilan I will test the code changes with your suggestion and update the answer. I am glad somebody with such good reputation got time to review my code. :) Thanks, Sandeep Commented Aug 12, 2018 at 19:55
  • Straight forward answer. Simple and easy to understand.
    – Joseph
    Commented Nov 14, 2021 at 19:01
3
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> SplitEvery<T>(this IEnumerable<T> values, int n)
{
    var ls = values.Take(n);
    var rs = values.Skip(n);
    return ls.Any() ?
        Cons(ls, SplitEvery(rs, n)) : 
        Enumerable.Empty<IEnumerable<T>>();
}

public static IEnumerable<T> Cons<T>(T x, IEnumerable<T> xs)
{
    yield return x;
    foreach (var xi in xs)
        yield return xi;
}
2
3

Six years later o_O

Just because

    public static IEnumerable<string> Split(this string str, int chunkSize, bool remainingInFront)
    {
        var count = (int) Math.Ceiling(str.Length/(double) chunkSize);
        Func<int, int> start = index => remainingInFront ? str.Length - (count - index)*chunkSize : index*chunkSize;
        Func<int, int> end = index => Math.Min(str.Length - Math.Max(start(index), 0), Math.Min(start(index) + chunkSize - Math.Max(start(index), 0), chunkSize));
        return Enumerable.Range(0, count).Select(i => str.Substring(Math.Max(start(i), 0),end(i)));
    }

or

    private static Func<bool, int, int, int, int, int> start = (remainingInFront, length, count, index, size) =>
        remainingInFront ? length - (count - index) * size : index * size;

    private static Func<bool, int, int, int, int, int, int> end = (remainingInFront, length, count, index, size, start) =>
        Math.Min(length - Math.Max(start, 0), Math.Min(start + size - Math.Max(start, 0), size));

    public static IEnumerable<string> Split(this string str, int chunkSize, bool remainingInFront)
    {
        var count = (int)Math.Ceiling(str.Length / (double)chunkSize);
        return Enumerable.Range(0, count).Select(i => str.Substring(
            Math.Max(start(remainingInFront, str.Length, count, i, chunkSize), 0),
            end(remainingInFront, str.Length, count, i, chunkSize, start(remainingInFront, str.Length, count, i, chunkSize))
        ));
    }

AFAIK all edge cases are handled.

Console.WriteLine(string.Join(" ", "abc".Split(2, false))); // ab c
Console.WriteLine(string.Join(" ", "abc".Split(2, true))); // a bc
Console.WriteLine(string.Join(" ", "a".Split(2, true))); // a
Console.WriteLine(string.Join(" ", "a".Split(2, false))); // a
1
  • 1
    What about the "input is an empty string" edge case? I'd expect that, just like with Split, to return an IEnumerable with a single empty-string containing entry.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 9:58
3

Use:

List<string> SplitString(int chunk, string input)
{
    List<string> list = new List<string>();
    int cycles = input.Length / chunk;

    if (input.Length % chunk != 0)
        cycles++;

    for (int i = 0; i < cycles; i++)
    {
        try
        {
            list.Add(input.Substring(i * chunk, chunk));
        }
        catch
        {
            list.Add(input.Substring(i * chunk));
        }
    }
    return list;
}
2
  • 1
    I like this answer a lot, but maybe you should use if ((i+1) * chunk >= input.Length) instead of try/catch as exceptions are for exceptional cases. Commented Apr 2, 2018 at 22:23
  • An explanation would be in order. E.g., what is the idea/gist? From the Help Center: "...always explain why the solution you're presenting is appropriate and how it works". Please respond by editing (changing) your answer, not here in comments (but *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** without *** *** *** *** *** "Edit:", "Update:", or similar - the answer should appear as if it was written today). Commented Nov 2, 2023 at 16:45
3
static IEnumerable<string> Split(string str, double chunkSize)
{
    // use integer division to determine how many chunks
    return Enumerable.Range(0, (int) Math.Ceiling(str.Length/chunkSize))
       // use the index of the item (thus 'i' param) to:
       .Select(i => new string(str
           // a: skip iterated chunks given
           .Skip(i * (int)chunkSize)
           // b: take the current chunk
           .Take((int)chunkSize)
           // force execution of select
           .ToArray()));
}

and another approach:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
                    
public class Program
{
    public static void Main()
    {
        
        var x = "Hello World";
        foreach(var i in x.ChunkString(2)) Console.WriteLine(i);
    }
}

public static class Ext{
    public static IEnumerable<string> ChunkString(this string val, int chunkSize){
        // iterate over every character in the string
        return val.Select((x,i) => new {Index = i, Value = x})
                  // group those characters by chunk size using
                  // integer division
                  .GroupBy(x => x.Index/chunkSize, x => x.Value)
                  // reassemble grouped chars into strings
                  .Select(x => string.Join("",x));
                  // after looking at this solution
                  // .Select(x => new string(x));
                  // may be more efficient than the .Join operation
                  // i have not tested this
    }
}
0
2

An important tip if the string that is being chunked needs to support all Unicode characters.

If the string is to support international characters like 𠀋, then split up the string using the System.Globalization.StringInfo class. Using StringInfo, you can split up the string based on number of text elements.

string internationalString = '𠀋';

The above string has a Length of 2, because the String.Length property returns the number of Char objects in this instance, not the number of Unicode characters.

2
static List<string> GetChunks(string value, int chunkLength)
{
    var res = new List<string>();
    int count = (value.Length / chunkLength) + (value.Length % chunkLength > 0 ? 1 : 0);
    Enumerable.Range(0, count).ToList().ForEach(f => res.Add(value.Skip(f * chunkLength).Take(chunkLength).Select(z => z.ToString()).Aggregate((a,b) => a+b)));
    return res;
}

demo

1
  • this one keeps the remainder of the string (post split) even it is shorter than "chunkLenght", thanks Commented Feb 13, 2020 at 5:16
2

Here's my 2 cents:

  IEnumerable<string> Split(string str, int chunkSize)
  {
     while (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(str))
     {
        var chunk = str.Take(chunkSize).ToArray();
        str = str.Substring(chunk.Length);
        yield return new string(chunk);

     }

  }//Split
0
2

Changed slightly to return parts whose size is not equal to chunkSize:

public static IEnumerable<string> Split(this string str, int chunkSize)
{
    var splits = new List<string>();
    if (str.Length < chunkSize) 
    { 
        chunkSize = str.Length;
    }
    splits.AddRange(Enumerable.Range(0, str.Length / chunkSize).Select(i => str.Substring(i * chunkSize, chunkSize)));
    splits.Add(str.Length % chunkSize > 0 ? str.Substring((str.Length / chunkSize) * chunkSize, str.Length - ((str.Length / chunkSize) * chunkSize)) : string.Empty);
    return (IEnumerable<string>)splits;
}
1
  • Not sure I see the use of back-casting that List to IEnumerable; all that does is hiding List-specific functions you might want to use. There is no downside whatsoever to just returning the List.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 9:52
2

I think this is an straightforward answer:

public static IEnumerable<string> Split(this string str, int chunkSize)
    {
        if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(str) || chunkSize<1)
            throw new ArgumentException("String can not be null or empty and chunk size should be greater than zero.");
        var chunkCount = str.Length / chunkSize + (str.Length % chunkSize != 0 ? 1 : 0);
        for (var i = 0; i < chunkCount; i++)
        {
            var startIndex = i * chunkSize;
            if (startIndex + chunkSize >= str.Length)
                yield return str.Substring(startIndex);
            else
                yield return str.Substring(startIndex, chunkSize);
        }
    }

And it covers edge cases.

2

I took this to another level. Chunking is an easy one-liner, but in my case I needed whole words as well.

static IEnumerable<string> Split(string orgString, int chunkSize, bool wholeWords = true)
{
    if (wholeWords)
    {
        List<string> result = new List<string>();
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();

        if (orgString.Length > chunkSize)
        {
            string[] newSplit = orgString.Split(' ');
            foreach (string str in newSplit)
            {
                if (sb.Length != 0)
                    sb.Append(" ");

                if (sb.Length + str.Length > chunkSize)
                {
                    result.Add(sb.ToString());
                    sb.Clear();
                }

                sb.Append(str);
            }

            result.Add(sb.ToString());
        }
        else
            result.Add(orgString);

        return result;
    }
    else
        return new List<string>(Regex.Split(orgString, @"(?<=\G.{" + chunkSize + "})", RegexOptions.Singleline));
}

Results based on a comment below:

string msg = "336699AABBCCDDEEFF";
foreach (string newMsg in Split(msg, 2, false))
{
    Console.WriteLine($">>{newMsg}<<");
}

Console.ReadKey();

Results:

>>33<<
>>66<<
>>99<<
>>AA<<
>>BB<<
>>CC<<
>>DD<<
>>EE<<
>>FF<<
>><<

Another way to pull it:

List<string> splitData = (List<string>)Split(msg, 2, false);

for (int i = 0; i < splitData.Count - 1; i++)
{
    Console.WriteLine($">>{splitData[i]}<<");
}

Console.ReadKey();

New Results:

>>33<<
>>66<<
>>99<<
>>AA<<
>>BB<<
>>CC<<
>>DD<<
>>EE<<
>>FF<<
5
  • One thing I noticed with your expression for the else-branch (not whole words) - when I use that expression with a chunk size of 2 for a string "336699AABBCCDDEEFF", the return is of size 10, where the last string (item 9) is null. That is, the return should be 9 strings of length 2, not 10 strings. What am I missing?
    – GTAE86
    Commented Dec 10, 2020 at 17:09
  • 1
    Thats because of the new string added to the end of each line, (RegexOptions.Singleline).
    – user1853517
    Commented Dec 11, 2020 at 20:02
  • 1
    Added demo code to show it's results above.
    – user1853517
    Commented Dec 11, 2020 at 20:12
  • 1
    Re "Chucking": Do you mean "Chunking"? Commented Nov 2, 2023 at 17:12
  • Fixed, thanks. Sometimes my fingers just type what they want, without a care in the world what my brain is saying. ha.
    – user1853517
    Commented Nov 6, 2023 at 18:04
1

I've slightly build up on João's solution.

What I've done differently is in my method you can actually specify whether you want to return the array with remaining characters or whether you want to truncate them if the end characters do not match your required chunk length. I think it's pretty flexible and the code is fairly straightforward:

using System;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

namespace SplitFunction
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string text = "hello, how are you doing today?";
            string[] chunks = SplitIntoChunks(text, 3,false);
            if (chunks != null)
            {
                chunks.ToList().ForEach(e => Console.WriteLine(e));
            }

            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        private static string[] SplitIntoChunks(string text, int chunkSize, bool truncateRemaining)
        {
            string chunk = chunkSize.ToString();
            string pattern = truncateRemaining ? ".{" + chunk + "}" : ".{1," + chunk + "}";

            string[] chunks = null;
            if (chunkSize > 0 && !String.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
                chunks = (from Match m in Regex.Matches(text,pattern)select m.Value).ToArray();

            return chunks;
        }
    }
}
1

I can't remember who gave me this, but it works great. I speed tested a number of ways to break Enumerable types into groups. The usage would just be like this...

List<string> Divided = Source3.Chunk(24).Select(Piece => string.Concat<char>(Piece)).ToList();

The extension code would look like this...

#region Chunk Logic
private class ChunkedEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<T>
{
    class ChildEnumerator : IEnumerator<T>
    {
        ChunkedEnumerable<T> parent;
        int position;
        bool done = false;
        T current;


        public ChildEnumerator(ChunkedEnumerable<T> parent)
        {
            this.parent = parent;
            position = -1;
            parent.wrapper.AddRef();
        }

        public T Current
        {
            get
            {
                if (position == -1 || done)
                {
                    throw new InvalidOperationException();
                }
                return current;

            }
        }

        public void Dispose()
        {
            if (!done)
            {
                done = true;
                parent.wrapper.RemoveRef();
            }
        }

        object System.Collections.IEnumerator.Current
        {
            get { return Current; }
        }

        public bool MoveNext()
        {
            position++;

            if (position + 1 > parent.chunkSize)
            {
                done = true;
            }

            if (!done)
            {
                done = !parent.wrapper.Get(position + parent.start, out current);
            }

            return !done;

        }

        public void Reset()
        {
            // Per http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.collections.ienumerator.reset.aspx
            throw new NotSupportedException();
        }
    }

    EnumeratorWrapper<T> wrapper;
    int chunkSize;
    int start;

    public ChunkedEnumerable(EnumeratorWrapper<T> wrapper, int chunkSize, int start)
    {
        this.wrapper = wrapper;
        this.chunkSize = chunkSize;
        this.start = start;
    }

    public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new ChildEnumerator(this);
    }

    System.Collections.IEnumerator System.Collections.IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }

}
private class EnumeratorWrapper<T>
{
    public EnumeratorWrapper(IEnumerable<T> source)
    {
        SourceEumerable = source;
    }
    IEnumerable<T> SourceEumerable { get; set; }

    Enumeration currentEnumeration;

    class Enumeration
    {
        public IEnumerator<T> Source { get; set; }
        public int Position { get; set; }
        public bool AtEnd { get; set; }
    }

    public bool Get(int pos, out T item)
    {

        if (currentEnumeration != null && currentEnumeration.Position > pos)
        {
            currentEnumeration.Source.Dispose();
            currentEnumeration = null;
        }

        if (currentEnumeration == null)
        {
            currentEnumeration = new Enumeration { Position = -1, Source = SourceEumerable.GetEnumerator(), AtEnd = false };
        }

        item = default(T);
        if (currentEnumeration.AtEnd)
        {
            return false;
        }

        while (currentEnumeration.Position < pos)
        {
            currentEnumeration.AtEnd = !currentEnumeration.Source.MoveNext();
            currentEnumeration.Position++;

            if (currentEnumeration.AtEnd)
            {
                return false;
            }

        }

        item = currentEnumeration.Source.Current;

        return true;
    }

    int refs = 0;

    // Needed for dispose semantics
    public void AddRef()
    {
        refs++;
    }

    public void RemoveRef()
    {
        refs--;
        if (refs == 0 && currentEnumeration != null)
        {
            var copy = currentEnumeration;
            currentEnumeration = null;
            copy.Source.Dispose();
        }
    }
}
/// <summary>Speed Checked.  Works Great!</summary>
public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Chunk<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int chunksize)
{
    if (chunksize < 1)
        throw new InvalidOperationException();

    var wrapper = new EnumeratorWrapper<T>(source);

    int currentPos = 0;
    T ignore;
    try
    {
        wrapper.AddRef();
        while (wrapper.Get(currentPos, out ignore))
        {
            yield return new ChunkedEnumerable<T>(wrapper, chunksize, currentPos);
            currentPos += chunksize;
        }
    }
    finally
    {
        wrapper.RemoveRef();
    }
}
#endregion
1

Modified (now it accepts any nonnull string and any positive chunkSize) Konstantin Spirin's solution:

public static IEnumerable<String> Split(String value, int chunkSize) {
  if (null == value)
    throw new ArgumentNullException("value");
  else if (chunkSize <= 0)
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("chunkSize", "Chunk size should be positive");

  return Enumerable
    .Range(0, value.Length / chunkSize + ((value.Length % chunkSize) == 0 ? 0 : 1))
    .Select(index => (index + 1) * chunkSize < value.Length
      ? value.Substring(index * chunkSize, chunkSize)
      : value.Substring(index * chunkSize));
}

Tests:

  String source = @"ABCDEF";

  // "ABCD,EF"
  String test1 = String.Join(",", Split(source, 4));
  // "AB,CD,EF"
  String test2 = String.Join(",", Split(source, 2));
  // "ABCDEF"
  String test3 = String.Join(",", Split(source, 123));
1

Use:

public static List<string> SplitByMaxLength(this string str, int maxLength)
{
    List<string> splitString = new List<string>();

    for (int index = 0; index < str.Length; index += maxLength)
    {
        splitString.Add(str.Substring(index, 
                                      Math.Min(maxLength, 
                                      str.Length - index)));
    }

    return splitString;
}
1
  • You, eh, forgot the MaxLength parameter.
    – Nyerguds
    Commented Nov 10, 2016 at 9:55