I have a data frame with a hierarchical index in axis 1 (columns) (from a groupby.agg operation):

     USAF   WBAN  year  month  day  s_PC  s_CL  s_CD  s_CNT  tempf       
                                     sum   sum   sum    sum   amax   amin
0  702730  26451  1993      1    1     1     0    12     13  30.92  24.98
1  702730  26451  1993      1    2     0     0    13     13  32.00  24.98
2  702730  26451  1993      1    3     1    10     2     13  23.00   6.98
3  702730  26451  1993      1    4     1     0    12     13  10.04   3.92
4  702730  26451  1993      1    5     3     0    10     13  19.94  10.94

I want to flatten it, so that it looks like this (names aren't critical - I could rename):

     USAF   WBAN  year  month  day  s_PC  s_CL  s_CD  s_CNT  tempf_amax  tmpf_amin   
0  702730  26451  1993      1    1     1     0    12     13  30.92          24.98
1  702730  26451  1993      1    2     0     0    13     13  32.00          24.98
2  702730  26451  1993      1    3     1    10     2     13  23.00          6.98
3  702730  26451  1993      1    4     1     0    12     13  10.04          3.92
4  702730  26451  1993      1    5     3     0    10     13  19.94          10.94

How do I do this? (I've tried a lot, to no avail.)

Per a suggestion, here is the head in dict form

{('USAF', ''): {0: '702730',
  1: '702730',
  2: '702730',
  3: '702730',
  4: '702730'},
 ('WBAN', ''): {0: '26451', 1: '26451', 2: '26451', 3: '26451', 4: '26451'},
 ('day', ''): {0: 1, 1: 2, 2: 3, 3: 4, 4: 5},
 ('month', ''): {0: 1, 1: 1, 2: 1, 3: 1, 4: 1},
 ('s_CD', 'sum'): {0: 12.0, 1: 13.0, 2: 2.0, 3: 12.0, 4: 10.0},
 ('s_CL', 'sum'): {0: 0.0, 1: 0.0, 2: 10.0, 3: 0.0, 4: 0.0},
 ('s_CNT', 'sum'): {0: 13.0, 1: 13.0, 2: 13.0, 3: 13.0, 4: 13.0},
 ('s_PC', 'sum'): {0: 1.0, 1: 0.0, 2: 1.0, 3: 1.0, 4: 3.0},
 ('tempf', 'amax'): {0: 30.920000000000002,
  1: 32.0,
  2: 23.0,
  3: 10.039999999999999,
  4: 19.939999999999998},
 ('tempf', 'amin'): {0: 24.98,
  1: 24.98,
  2: 6.9799999999999969,
  3: 3.9199999999999982,
  4: 10.940000000000001},
 ('year', ''): {0: 1993, 1: 1993, 2: 1993, 3: 1993, 4: 1993}}
  • 4
    can you add the output of df[:5].to_dict() as an example for others to read in your dataset? – Zelazny7 Jan 24 '13 at 18:18
  • Good idea. Did it above since it was too long for the comment. – Ross R Jan 24 '13 at 18:37
  • There is a suggestion on the pandas issue tracker to implement a dedicated method for this. – Joel Ostblom Jul 10 at 1:29

12 Answers 12

up vote 255 down vote accepted

I think the easiest way to do this would be to set the columns to the top level:

df.columns = df.columns.get_level_values(0)

Note: if the to level has a name you can also access it by this, rather than 0.

.

If you want to combine/join your MultiIndex into one Index (assuming you have just string entries in your columns) you could:

df.columns = [' '.join(col).strip() for col in df.columns.values]

Note: we must strip the whitespace for when there is no second index.

In [11]: [' '.join(col).strip() for col in df.columns.values]
Out[11]: 
['USAF',
 'WBAN',
 'day',
 'month',
 's_CD sum',
 's_CL sum',
 's_CNT sum',
 's_PC sum',
 'tempf amax',
 'tempf amin',
 'year']
  • 3
    df.reset_index(inplace=True) could be an alternative solution. – Tobias Jun 7 '17 at 6:15
  • 3
    one minor comment... if you want to use _ for the combine column multilevels.. you could use this... df.columns = ['_'.join(col).strip() for col in df.columns.values] – ihightower Jul 3 '17 at 16:05
  • 11
    minor modification to maintain underscore for joined cols only: ['_'.join(col).rstrip('_') for col in df.columns.values] – Seiji Armstrong Feb 13 at 19:02
pd.DataFrame(df.to_records()) # multiindex become columns and new index is integers only
  • 2
    This works, but leaves behind column names which are difficult to access programmatically and are not queriable – dmeu Jun 29 '17 at 8:53
  • This will not work with the latest version of pandas. It works with 0.18 but not with 0.20 (latest as of now) – TH22 Oct 10 '17 at 20:59
  • @dmeu to preserve column names pd.DataFrame(df.to_records(), columns=df.index.names + list(df.columns)) – Teoretic Aug 3 at 10:13
  • 1
    @TH22 it workes for me with 0.23.3 version – Teoretic Aug 3 at 10:16

Andy Hayden's answer is certainly the easiest way -- if you want to avoid duplicate column labels you need to tweak a bit

In [34]: df
Out[34]: 
     USAF   WBAN  day  month  s_CD  s_CL  s_CNT  s_PC  tempf         year
                               sum   sum    sum   sum   amax   amin      
0  702730  26451    1      1    12     0     13     1  30.92  24.98  1993
1  702730  26451    2      1    13     0     13     0  32.00  24.98  1993
2  702730  26451    3      1     2    10     13     1  23.00   6.98  1993
3  702730  26451    4      1    12     0     13     1  10.04   3.92  1993
4  702730  26451    5      1    10     0     13     3  19.94  10.94  1993


In [35]: mi = df.columns

In [36]: mi
Out[36]: 
MultiIndex
[(USAF, ), (WBAN, ), (day, ), (month, ), (s_CD, sum), (s_CL, sum), (s_CNT, sum), (s_PC, sum), (tempf, amax), (tempf, amin), (year, )]


In [37]: mi.tolist()
Out[37]: 
[('USAF', ''),
 ('WBAN', ''),
 ('day', ''),
 ('month', ''),
 ('s_CD', 'sum'),
 ('s_CL', 'sum'),
 ('s_CNT', 'sum'),
 ('s_PC', 'sum'),
 ('tempf', 'amax'),
 ('tempf', 'amin'),
 ('year', '')]

In [38]: ind = pd.Index([e[0] + e[1] for e in mi.tolist()])

In [39]: ind
Out[39]: Index([USAF, WBAN, day, month, s_CDsum, s_CLsum, s_CNTsum, s_PCsum, tempfamax, tempfamin, year], dtype=object)

In [40]: df.columns = ind




In [46]: df
Out[46]: 
     USAF   WBAN  day  month  s_CDsum  s_CLsum  s_CNTsum  s_PCsum  tempfamax  tempfamin  \
0  702730  26451    1      1       12        0        13        1      30.92      24.98   
1  702730  26451    2      1       13        0        13        0      32.00      24.98   
2  702730  26451    3      1        2       10        13        1      23.00       6.98   
3  702730  26451    4      1       12        0        13        1      10.04       3.92   
4  702730  26451    5      1       10        0        13        3      19.94      10.94   




   year  
0  1993  
1  1993  
2  1993  
3  1993  
4  1993
  • 1
    thanks Theodros! This is the only correct solution which handles all the cases! – CanCeylan Jul 31 '17 at 13:57
  • You're a legend! Thanks for the nicely explained solution! – Wael Hussein Apr 13 at 21:59
df.columns = ['_'.join(tup).rstrip('_') for tup in df.columns.values]

And if you want to retain any of the aggregation info from the second level of the multiindex you can try this:

In [1]: new_cols = [''.join(t) for t in df.columns]
Out[1]:
['USAF',
 'WBAN',
 'day',
 'month',
 's_CDsum',
 's_CLsum',
 's_CNTsum',
 's_PCsum',
 'tempfamax',
 'tempfamin',
 'year']

In [2]: df.columns = new_cols
  • new_cols isn't defined. – samthebrand Oct 7 '15 at 23:36
  • Also, this didn't work for me. – samthebrand Oct 7 '15 at 23:56

After reading through all the answers, I came up with this:

def __my_flatten_cols(self, how="_".join, reset_index=True):
    how = (lambda iter: list(iter)[-1]) if how == "last" else how
    self.columns = [how(filter(None, map(str, levels))) for levels in self.columns.values] \
                    if isinstance(self.columns, pd.MultiIndex) else self.columns
    return self.reset_index() if reset_index else self
pd.DataFrame.my_flatten_cols = __my_flatten_cols

Usage:

Given a data frame:

df = pd.DataFrame({"grouper": ["x","x","y","y"], "val1": [0,2,4,6], 2: [1,3,5,7]}, columns=["grouper", "val1", 2])

  grouper  val1  2
0       x     0  1
1       x     2  3
2       y     4  5
3       y     6  7
  • Single aggregation method: resulting variables named the same as source:

    df.groupby(by="grouper").agg("min").my_flatten_cols()
    
    • Same as df.groupby(by="grouper", as_index=False) or .agg(...).reset_index()
    • ----- before -----
                 val1  2
        grouper         
      
      ------ after -----
        grouper  val1  2
      0       x     0  1
      1       y     4  5
      
  • Single source variable, multiple aggregations: resulting variables named after statistics:

    df.groupby(by="grouper").agg({"val1": [min,max]}).my_flatten_cols("last")
    
    • Same as a = df.groupby(..).agg(..); a.columns = a.columns.droplevel(0); a.reset_index().
    • ----- before -----
                  val1    
                 min max
        grouper         
      
      ------ after -----
        grouper  min  max
      0       x    0    2
      1       y    4    6
      
  • Multiple variables, multiple aggregations: resulting variables named (varname)_(statname):

    df.groupby(by="grouper").agg({"val1": min, 2:[sum, "size"]}).my_flatten_cols()
    # you can combine the names in other ways too, e.g. use a different delimiter:
    #df.groupby(by="grouper").agg({"val1": min, 2:[sum, "size"]}).my_flatten_cols(" ".join)
    
    • Runs a.columns = ["_".join(filter(None, map(str, levels))) for levels in a.columns.values] under the hood (since this form of agg() results in MultiIndex on columns).
    • If you don't have the my_flatten_cols helper, it might be easier to type in the solution suggested by @Seigi: a.columns = ["_".join(t).rstrip("_") for t in a.columns.values], which works similarly in this case (but fails if you have numeric labels on columns)
    • To handle the numeric labels on columns, you could use the solution suggested by @jxstanford and @Nolan Conaway (a.columns = ["_".join(tuple(map(str, t))).rstrip("_") for t in a.columns.values]), but I don't understand why the tuple() call is needed, and I believe rstrip() is only required if some columns have a descriptor like ("colname", "") (which can happen if you reset_index() before trying to fix up .columns)
    • ----- before -----
                 val1           2     
                 min       sum    size
        grouper              
      
      ------ after -----
        grouper  val1_min  2_sum  2_size
      0       x         0      4       2
      1       y         4     12       2
      
  • You want to name the resulting variables manually: (this is deprecated since pandas 0.20.0 with no adequate alternative as of 0.23)

    df.groupby(by="grouper").agg({"val1": {"sum_of_val1": "sum", "count_of_val1": "count"},
                                       2: {"sum_of_2":    "sum", "count_of_2":    "count"}}).my_flatten_cols("last")
    
    • Other suggestions include: setting the columns manually: res.columns = ['A_sum', 'B_sum', 'count'] or .join()ing multiple groupby statements.
    • ----- before -----
                         val1                      2         
                count_of_val1 sum_of_val1 count_of_2 sum_of_2
        grouper                                              
      
      ------ after -----
        grouper  count_of_val1  sum_of_val1  count_of_2  sum_of_2
      0       x              2            2           2         4
      1       y              2           10           2        12
      

Cases handled by the helper function

  • level names can be non-string, e.g. Index pandas DataFrame by column numbers, when column names are integers, so we have to convert with map(str, ..)
  • they can also be empty, so we have to filter(None, ..)
  • for single-level columns (i.e. anything except MultiIndex), columns.values returns the names (str, not tuples)
  • depending on how you used .agg() you may need to keep the bottom-most label for a column or concatenate multiple labels
  • (since I'm new to pandas?) more often than not, I want reset_index() to be able to work with the group-by columns in the regular way, so it does that by default
  • really great answer, can you please explain the working on of '["".join(tuple(map(str, t))).rstrip("") for t in a.columns.values]', thanks in advance – Vineet Jul 26 at 13:05
  • @Vineet I updated my post to indicate that I mentioned that snippet to suggest it has a similar effect to my solution. If you want details on why tuple() is needed, you might want to comment on jxstanford's post. Otherwise, it might be helpful to inspect the .columns.values in the provided example: [('val1', 'min'), (2, 'sum'), (2, 'size')]. 1) for t in a.columns.values loops over the columns, for the second column t == (2, 'sum'); 2) map(str, t) applies str() to each "level", resulting in ('2', 'sum'); 3) "_".join(('2','sum')) results in "2_sum", – Nickolay Jul 26 at 17:07

In case you want to have a separator in the name between levels, this function works well.

def flattenHierarchicalCol(col,sep = '_'):
    if not type(col) is tuple:
        return col
    else:
        new_col = ''
        for leveli,level in enumerate(col):
            if not level == '':
                if not leveli == 0:
                    new_col += sep
                new_col += level
        return new_col

df.columns = df.columns.map(flattenHierarchicalCol)
  • 1
    I like it. Leaving out the case where the columns are not hierarchical this can be simplified a lot: df.columns = ["_".join(filter(None, c)) for c in df.columns] – Gigo Oct 19 '16 at 22:41

A bit late maybe, but if you are not worried about duplicate column names:

df.columns = df.columns.tolist()
  • For me, this changes the columns' names to be tuple-like: (year, ) and (tempf, amax) – Nickolay May 28 at 7:44

A general solution that handles multiple levels and mixed types:

df.columns = ['_'.join(tuple(map(str, t))) for t in df.columns.values]
  • In case there are non-hierarchical columns as well: df.columns = ['_'.join(tuple(map(str, t))).rstrip('_') for t in df.columns.values] – Nolan Conaway Aug 10 '17 at 20:30

Following @jxstanford and @tvt173, I wrote a quick function which should do the trick, regardless of string/int column names:

def flatten_cols(df):
    df.columns = [
        '_'.join(tuple(map(str, t))).rstrip('_') 
        for t in df.columns.values
        ]
    return df

You could also do as below. Consider df to be your dataframe and assume a two level index (as is the case in your example)

df.columns = [(df.columns[i][0])+'_'+(datadf_pos4.columns[i][1]) for i in range(len(df.columns))]
  • 1
    This would read better if you formatted it better. – Ding Oct 27 '16 at 23:37

The most pythonic way to do this to use map function.

df.columns = df.columns.map(' '.join).str.strip()

Output print(df.columns):

Index(['USAF', 'WBAN', 'day', 'month', 's_CD sum', 's_CL sum', 's_CNT sum',
       's_PC sum', 'tempf amax', 'tempf amin', 'year'],
      dtype='object')

protected by coldspeed Aug 25 '17 at 9:57

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