5

This link doesn't answer my question so I'll ask it here:

Basically I want to write a template function

template <typename Out, typename In>
Out f(In x);

Here I always need to specify Out when calling f. I don't want to do it every time, so I basically want

template <typename Out = In, typename In>
Out f(In x);

Which means if I don't specify Out, it will default to In. However, this is not possible in C++11.

So my question is, is there any way to achieve the effect:

  1. calling f(t) will instantiate f<T,T>(t) or more generally f<typename SomeThing<T>::type, T>
  2. calling f<U>(t) will instantiate f<U, T>(t)
3
  • What is the difference between <typename Out = In, typename In> and <typename Out, typename In = Out>? Jan 24 '13 at 19:09
  • @AlexChamberlain the first order does not know how to set the default of Out to In because it hasn't seen In yet at that point. Jan 24 '13 at 19:21
  • @icando why is reversing the order of template arguments not an option for you? see my answer. (other answers that proposed this are gone so I missed the arguments why they were not satisfactory) Jan 24 '13 at 19:32
8

You probably never want to specify In but rather have it deduced, right?

In this case you need to overload the function:

template <typename Out, In>
Out f(In x);

template <typename T>
T f(T x);

Call it:

f(42);
f<float>(42);

… but unfortunately that’s ambiguous for f<int>(42). No matter, we can use SFINAE to disable one of the overloads appropriately:

template <
    typename Out,
    typename In,
    typename = typename std::enable_if<not std::is_same<Out, In>::value>::type
>
Out f(In x);

template <typename T>
T f(T x);

In order to avoid redundancy in the implementation, let both functions dispatch to a common implementation, f_impl.

Here’s a working example:

template <typename Out, typename In>
Out f_impl(In x) {
    std::cout << "f<" << typeid(Out).name() <<
                 ", " << typeid(In).name() <<
                 ">(" << x << ")\n";
    return x;
}

template <
    typename Out,
    typename In,
    typename = typename std::enable_if<not std::is_same<Out, In>::value>::type
>
Out f(In x) {
    std::cout << "f<Out, In>(x):\t ";
    return f_impl<Out, In>(x);
}

template <typename T>
T f(T x) {
    std::cout << "f<T>(x):\t ";
    return f_impl<T, T>(x);
}


int main() {
    f(42);
    f<float>(42);
    f<int>(42);
}
12
  • What happens if I call f<int>(4.2)?
    – K-ballo
    Jan 24 '13 at 19:15
  • 2
    @K-ballo The correct thing. Try it. Jan 24 '13 at 19:17
  • This generally looks good with a little drawback: f<int>(5) will cause compiler error: ambiguous overload. Anyway to solve the issue?
    – Kan Li
    Jan 24 '13 at 19:22
  • 1
    @icando I can’t point to the section but one of the overloads requires an implicit conversion of 42 to float while the other is an exact match so there’s no ambiguity. Jan 24 '13 at 19:27
  • 2
    You can replace the second prototype of f with template <bool=true,typename T> T f(T x) so it is ignored when you specify a template parameter (then you can remove the enable_if). Jan 24 '13 at 21:20
4

You may not need it here, but here is a classical technique:

struct Default
{
  template <typename Argument, typename Value>
    struct Get {
      typedef Argument type;
    };

  template <typename Value>
    struct Get <Default, Value> {
      typedef Value type;
    };
};

template <typename Out = Default, typename In>
typename Default::Get<Out, In>::type f(In x);
3
  • This still requires the existance of a type that you can't put as Out. For example, calling f<Default>(5) will still goes to f<int, int> instead of f<Default, int>. This is not what I want. If there exists such type that I can't put into the parameter list, then I can do a lot of things, e.g. disable_if. But such requirement makes it imperfect.
    – Kan Li
    Jan 24 '13 at 19:31
  • If I make Default non-movable, you won't be able to declare a function that returns it anyway, so there is no loss here. Jan 24 '13 at 19:47
  • You could even use a preexisting non-movable type like std::mutex as the dummy type. f<std::mutex,whatever> is already meaningless, nothing to lose. Jan 24 '13 at 20:00
2

I have a PERFECT solution here! f<const int&> won't work because a function can't return a reference to a temporary, not related to the techniques used here.

[hidden]$ cat a.cpp
#include <iostream>
#include <type_traits>
#include <typeinfo>
using namespace std;

template <typename Out, typename In>
Out f_impl(In x) {
  cout << "Out=" << typeid(Out).name() << " " << "In=" << typeid(In).name() << endl;
  return Out();
}

template <typename T, typename... Args>
struct FirstOf {
  typedef T type;
};

template <typename T, typename U>
struct SecondOf {
  typedef U type;
};

template <typename... Args, typename In>
typename enable_if<sizeof...(Args) <= 1, typename FirstOf<Args..., In>::type>::type f(In x) {
  typedef typename FirstOf<Args..., In>::type Out;
  return f_impl<Out, In>(x);
}

template <typename... Args, typename In>
typename enable_if<sizeof...(Args) == 2, typename FirstOf<Args...>::type>::type f(In x) {
  typedef typename FirstOf<Args...>::type Out;
  typedef typename SecondOf<Args...>::type RealIn;
  return f_impl<Out, RealIn>(x);
}

int main() {
  f(1);
  f(1.0);
  f<double>(1);
  f<int>(1.0);
  f<int>(1);
  f<const int>(1);
  f<int, double>(1);
  f<int, int>(1);
  f<double, double>(1);
}
[hidden]$ g++ -std=c++11 a.cpp
[hidden]$ ./a.out
Out=i In=i
Out=d In=d
Out=d In=i
Out=i In=d
Out=i In=i
Out=i In=i
Out=i In=d
Out=i In=i
Out=d In=d
2
  • I'm a bit surprised template <typename... Args, typename In> is legal. :) And shouldn't you use perfect forwarding on f(In x) when forwarding to f_impl? Jan 25 '13 at 1:11
  • I am surprised too. I am very surprised that by using varadic template one can actually tell whether you are calling with f(x) or f<T>(x) or f<T,U>(x), etc.
    – Kan Li
    Jan 25 '13 at 3:19

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