19

Can we use multiple variables in foreach

foreach (var item1 in collection1;var items2 in collection2)
{

}

I want to do this because I need to fetch two collections from a database and append both of them to a ComboBox.

11
  • Care to describe in more detail how you'd expect this to work? Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:31
  • @MichaelPetrotta I have two collection where i like to append two result for the combobox
    – Anish
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:32
  • 1
    What I mean is, how would you expect this construct to actually function? Given your sample code above, and assuming that collection1 and collection2 are of different lengths, what would you want this to actually do? Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:34
  • I don't know who reduce the mark...............
    – Anish
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:42
  • 5
    This is an XY problem. You're asking about a detailed (incorrect) solution, rather than about the actual issue you're facing. Please state the intention of what you want to do.
    – J. Steen
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:42

10 Answers 10

16

Use LINQ to join the arrays putting the result into an anonymous type, then iterate over the resulting collection.

var col = collection1.Join(collection2, x => x, y => y, (x, y) => new { X = x, Y = y });
foreach (var entry in col) {
    // entry.X, entry.Y
}

Edit:

When posting the answer I assumed that collection1 and collection2 contained different types. If they contain both the same type or share a common base type, there are alternatives:

If you want to allow duplicates:

collection1.Concat(collection2); // same type
collection1.select(x => (baseType)x).Concat(collection2.select(x => (baseType)x)); // shared base type

No duplicates:

collection1.Union(collection2); // same type
collection1.select(x => (baseType)x).Union(collection2.select(x => (baseType)x)); // shared base type

Form framework 4.0 onwards Zip can replace the original solution:

collection1.Zip(collection2, (x, y) => new { X = x, Y = y });

For an overview over most of the available LINQ funktions please refer to 101 LINQ Samples.

Without LINQ use two hierarchical foreach loops (increasing the number of interations) or one foreach loop to create an inermediate type and a second to iterate over the collection of intermediates or if the types in the collections are the same add them to a list (using AddRange) and then iterate over this new list.

Many roads lead to one goal ... its up to you to chose one.

5
  • I am not getting this result guys
    – Anish
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:46
  • What result, exactly, are you not getting, Anish? Be specific. Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:49
  • @MichaelPetrotta I will get back to you once i try it
    – Anish
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:58
  • 1
    Use Zip instead: var col = collection1.Zip(collection2, (X, Y) => new {X, Y}); foreach (var entry in col) //...
    – phoog
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:19
  • @Anish: Added a mor complete review of the topic. Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 10:57
7

You can Zip the collections

foreach (var item in collection1.Zip(collection2, (a, b) => new {  A = a, B = b }))
{
  var a = item.A;
  var b = item.B;
  // ...
}

This assumes that the elements match at the same position (e.g. the first element from collection1 joins the first element of collecion2). It is quite efficient.

3

No, you cannot use multiple variables in a foreach, in loop. Check the language reference. What would happen if each collection had a different number of items?

If you want to iterate over both collections, try using a union:

foreach (var item1 in collection1.Union(collection2))
{
   ...
}
3
  • What can we do then in php we can use two variables why not in dot net
    – Anish
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 6:33
  • @Anish in Visual Basic, we can create exception filters. Why not in C#?
    – phoog
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:29
  • @Anish you misinterpret my comment. Let me rephrase: In the farmer's market, we can buy spinach. Why not in the bookstore?
    – phoog
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:41
2

You can do it using a newer syntax:

    var collection1 = new List<int>(){1,2,3,4};
    var collection2 = new List<int>(){5,6,7,8};
    
    var zip = collection1.Zip(collection2, (i,j) => (i,j));
    
    foreach (var (item1, item2) in zip)
    {
        Console.WriteLine($"item1:{item1} item2:{item2}");
    }

    // outputs:
    //item1:1 item2:5
    //item1:2 item2:6
    //item1:3 item2:7
    //item1:4 item2:8
1

foreach is used to enumerate individual items in a collection. So no you can't. You have to use it one after the other. It would be better to use:

void myfunc()
{}

foreach(var item1 in collection1){myfunc();}
foreach(var item2 in collection2){myfunc();}

than

foreach(var item1 in collection1)
foreach(var item2 in collection2)
{
    myfunc();
}

This would run for n*m times. Whereas previous example would run for only n+m times.

1

Judging by your comments I think what you're really trying to do is not get the Cartesian product of the two collections, but a [SQL] UNION of the two sets. You have two options:

  1. Concat the two collections:

    foreach(var items in collection1.Concat(collection2)) {}
    
  2. Just add them both separately, assuming you don't need to do anything fancy by iterating (probably the best/simplest):

    myComboBox.Items.AddRange(collection1);
    myComboBox.Items.AddRange(collection2);
    

If, however, you do want the n*m Cartesian product of [SQL pseudocode] collection1 CROSS JOIN collection2, you would use two nested foreach statements:

foreach(var item1 in collection1)
foreach(var item2 in collection2)
{
}

Or, you can join the two in LINQ and iterate over the joined collection:

foreach(var items in (from i1 in collection1 
                      from i2 in collection2 
                      select Tuple.Create(i1, i2)))
{
}
5
  • From the comments provided, it would seem that example 2, the small, two-line example of code, would be the best bet at an appropriate, uncomplicated, working answer. =)
    – J. Steen
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:00
  • @J.Steen Agreed. I didn't see the new comments. Edited and reordered my answer. (Thanks for your comment edit as well :))
    – lc.
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:03
  • @lc. You kept me on my toes! =)
    – J. Steen
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:06
  • @Ic. System.Collections.ArrayList' does not contain a definition for 'Concat' this error is shown
    – Anish
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:14
  • @Anish Did you forget a using System.Linq;?
    – lc.
    Commented Jan 25, 2013 at 7:15
0

Do you want to pair the items from one collection with corresponding items of the other?

foreach (var pair in col1.Zip(col2, (Item1, Item2) => new { Item1, Item2 })
{
    //do something with pair.Item1 and pair.Item2
}

Note: if the first collection has 10 items and the second has 8, you will get 8 pairs; the last two items in the first collection will be dropped because there's nothing to match them with in the second collection. More generally, the number of iterations will be Min(col1.Count(), col2.Count()).

Do you want to iterate all of the items in one collection and then all of the items in the second?

foreach (var element in col1.Concat(col2))
{
    //do something with element
}

Note: if the first collection has 10 elements and the second has 8, this loop will execute 18 times, or, more generally, the number of iterations will be col1.Count() + col2.Count().

Do you want to pair each item in one collection with each item in the other?

foreach (var item1 in col1)
    foreach (var item2 in col2)
    {
         //do something with item1 and item2
    }

Note: this is the cartesian product, so, not surprisingly, the number of iterations is the product of the collections' sizes. If we have 10 and 8 items, the loop will execute 80 times. For consistency's sake, that's col1.Count() * col2.Count().

0

You could use an iterator:

IEnumerator <Item2Type> item2Itt = Collection2.GetEnumerator();
item2Itt.MoveNext(); // The iterator returned above is BEFORE the first element in the collection.
foreach (Item1Type item1 in collection1)
{
    item1.blahblahblah;
    item2Itt.Current.blahBlahBlah;
    item2Itt.MoveNext();
}
0

I think this way can be used:

List<Type> allOfThem = new List<Type>(); //use proper type for collection
allOfThem.AddRange(collection1);
allOfThem.AddRange(collection2);

foreach (Type item in allOfThem)
{
...
} 
0

Using enumerator is the simplest way to do it. You can use either of the two collection to get the enumerator and run foreach on the other one.


    public void MatchSentences() {
                string[] OrigSentences = { "hello you", "what are you doing", "hope things are fine" };
                string[] CompareSentences = { "hello you", "what are you doing", "hope things are fine" };
                // Get enumerator on the second collection
                var outputStrEnum = CompareSentences.GetEnumerator();
    
                // Run foreach on the first collection
                foreach (var sentence in OrigSentences) {
                    outputStrEnum.MoveNext();
                    string testAgainst = outputStrEnum.Current.ToString();
                    bool result = sentence.Equals(testAgainst);
                    
                    Assert.IsTrue(result,
                        String.Format(" Expected for '{0}': {1}; Actual: '{2}'",
                                testAgainst, result,sentence) );
                }
    
            }

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