101

I have a Windows Forms application VS2010 C# which displays a MessageBox with an OK button.

How can I make it so that, if the user walks away, the message box automatically closes after a timeout of, say, 5 seconds?

2

12 Answers 12

139

Try the following approach:

AutoClosingMessageBox.Show("Text", "Caption", 1000);

Where the AutoClosingMessageBox class implemented as following:

public class AutoClosingMessageBox {
    System.Threading.Timer _timeoutTimer;
    string _caption;
    AutoClosingMessageBox(string text, string caption, int timeout) {
        _caption = caption;
        _timeoutTimer = new System.Threading.Timer(OnTimerElapsed,
            null, timeout, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);
        using(_timeoutTimer)
            MessageBox.Show(text, caption);
    }
    public static void Show(string text, string caption, int timeout) {
        new AutoClosingMessageBox(text, caption, timeout);
    }
    void OnTimerElapsed(object state) {
        IntPtr mbWnd = FindWindow("#32770", _caption); // lpClassName is #32770 for MessageBox
        if(mbWnd != IntPtr.Zero)
            SendMessage(mbWnd, WM_CLOSE, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero);
        _timeoutTimer.Dispose();
    }
    const int WM_CLOSE = 0x0010;
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern IntPtr FindWindow(string lpClassName, string lpWindowName);
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = System.Runtime.InteropServices.CharSet.Auto)]
    static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, UInt32 Msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);
}

Update: If you want to get the return value of the underlying MessageBox when user selects something before the timeout you can use the following version of this code:

var userResult = AutoClosingMessageBox.Show("Yes or No?", "Caption", 1000, MessageBoxButtons.YesNo);
if(userResult == System.Windows.Forms.DialogResult.Yes) { 
    // do something
}
...
public class AutoClosingMessageBox {
    System.Threading.Timer _timeoutTimer;
    string _caption;
    DialogResult _result;
    DialogResult _timerResult;
    AutoClosingMessageBox(string text, string caption, int timeout, MessageBoxButtons buttons = MessageBoxButtons.OK, DialogResult timerResult = DialogResult.None) {
        _caption = caption;
        _timeoutTimer = new System.Threading.Timer(OnTimerElapsed,
            null, timeout, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);
        _timerResult = timerResult;
        using(_timeoutTimer)
            _result = MessageBox.Show(text, caption, buttons);
    }
    public static DialogResult Show(string text, string caption, int timeout, MessageBoxButtons buttons = MessageBoxButtons.OK, DialogResult timerResult = DialogResult.None) {
        return new AutoClosingMessageBox(text, caption, timeout, buttons, timerResult)._result;
    }
    void OnTimerElapsed(object state) {
        IntPtr mbWnd = FindWindow("#32770", _caption); // lpClassName is #32770 for MessageBox
        if(mbWnd != IntPtr.Zero)
            SendMessage(mbWnd, WM_CLOSE, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero);
        _timeoutTimer.Dispose();
        _result = _timerResult;
    }
    const int WM_CLOSE = 0x0010;
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
    static extern IntPtr FindWindow(string lpClassName, string lpWindowName);
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = System.Runtime.InteropServices.CharSet.Auto)]
    static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, UInt32 Msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);
}

Yet another Update

I have checked the @Jack's case with YesNo buttons and discovered that the approach with sending the WM_CLOSE message does not work at all.
I will provide a fix in the context of the separate AutoclosingMessageBox library. This library contains redesigned approach and, I believe, can be useful to someone.
It also available via NuGet package:

Install-Package AutoClosingMessageBox

Release Notes (v1.0.0.2):

  • New Show(IWin32Owner) API to support most popular scenarios (in the context of #1 );
  • New AutoClosingMessageBox.Factory() API to provide full control on MessageBox showing;

Release Notes (v1.0.0.3):

  • New Count-Down feature (in the context of #4);
  • NET.6 migration;
15
  • Better use System.Threading.Timer or System.Timers.Timer (like @Jens answer) ? SendMessage vs PostMessage ?
    – Kiquenet
    Jan 28, 2013 at 8:47
  • @Kiquenet I believe there are no significant differences in this specific situation.
    – DmitryG
    Jan 28, 2013 at 9:12
  • 1
    @GeorgeBirbilis Thanks, it can make a sense... In this case you can use #32770 value as a class name
    – DmitryG
    Sep 2, 2015 at 15:13
  • 2
    It does not work for me if buttons are System.Windows.Forms.MessageBoxButtons.YesNo
    – Jack
    Nov 23, 2016 at 16:18
  • 1
    @Jack Sorry for late reply, I have checked the case with YesNo buttons - you are absolutely correct - it does not work. I will provide a fix in the context the separate AutoclosingMessageBox library. The contains the redesigned approach and, I believe can be useful. Thanks!
    – DmitryG
    Apr 24, 2017 at 10:45
46

A solution that works in WinForms:

var w = new Form() { Size = new Size(0, 0) };
Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10))
    .ContinueWith((t) => w.Close(), TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext());

MessageBox.Show(w, message, caption);

Based on the effect that closing the form that owns the message box will close the box as well.

Windows Forms controls have a requirement that they must be accessed on the same thread that created them. Using TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext() will ensure that, assuming that the example code above is executed on the UI thread, or an user-created thread. The example will not work correctly if the code is executed on a thread from a thread pool (e.g. a timer callback) or a task pool (e.g. on a task created with TaskFactory.StartNew or Task.Run with default parameters).

7
  • What's version .NET ? What's it TaskScheduler ?
    – Kiquenet
    Oct 17, 2014 at 11:07
  • 1
    @Kiquenet .NET 4.0 and up. Task and TaskScheduler are from namespace System.Threading.Tasks in mscorlib.dll so no additional assembly references are needed.
    – BSharp
    Oct 17, 2014 at 22:17
  • 2
    Great solution! One addition... this worked well in a Winforms app, AFTER adding BringToFront for the new form, right after creating it. Otherwise, the dialog boxes sometimes showed behind the current active form, i.e., did not appear to the user. var w = new Form() { Size = new Size(0, 0) }; w.BringToFront(); Aug 1, 2017 at 22:03
  • @Developer63 I could not reproduce your experience. Even when calling w.SentToBack() right before MessageBox.Show(), the dialog box still showed on top of the main form. Tested on .NET 4.5 and 4.7.1.
    – BSharp
    Feb 28, 2018 at 22:59
  • This solution could be nice, but it is only available from .NET 4.5 and up, not 4.0 (because of Task.Delay) see: stackoverflow.com/questions/17717047/…
    – KwentRell
    Apr 27, 2018 at 8:09
19

AppActivate!

If you don't mind muddying your references a bit, you can include Microsoft.Visualbasic, and use this very short way.

Display the MessageBox

    (new System.Threading.Thread(CloseIt)).Start();
    MessageBox.Show("HI");

CloseIt Function:

public void CloseIt()
{
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(2000);
    Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.AppActivate( 
         System.Diagnostics.Process.GetCurrentProcess().Id);
    System.Windows.Forms.SendKeys.SendWait(" ");
}

Now go wash your hands!

11

You could try this:

[DllImport("user32.dll", EntryPoint="FindWindow", SetLastError = true)]
static extern IntPtr FindWindowByCaption(IntPtr ZeroOnly, string lpWindowName);

[DllImport("user32.Dll")]
static extern int PostMessage(IntPtr hWnd, UInt32 msg, int wParam, int lParam);

private const UInt32 WM_CLOSE = 0x0010;

public void ShowAutoClosingMessageBox(string message, string caption)
{
    var timer = new System.Timers.Timer(5000) { AutoReset = false };
    timer.Elapsed += delegate
    {
        IntPtr hWnd = FindWindowByCaption(IntPtr.Zero, caption);
        if (hWnd.ToInt32() != 0) PostMessage(hWnd, WM_CLOSE, 0, 0);
    };
    timer.Enabled = true;
    MessageBox.Show(message, caption);
}
3
11

The System.Windows.MessageBox.Show() method has an overload which takes an owner Window as the first parameter. If we create an invisible owner Window which we then close after a specified time, it's child message box would close as well.

Window owner = CreateAutoCloseWindow(dialogTimeout);
MessageBoxResult result = MessageBox.Show(owner, ...

So far so good. But how do we close a window if the UI thread is blocked by the message box and UI controls can't be accessed from a worker thread? The answer is - by sending a WM_CLOSE windows message to the owner window handle:

Window CreateAutoCloseWindow(TimeSpan timeout)
{
    Window window = new Window()
    {
        WindowStyle = WindowStyle.None,
        WindowState = System.Windows.WindowState.Maximized,
        Background =  System.Windows.Media.Brushes.Transparent, 
        AllowsTransparency = true,
        ShowInTaskbar = false,
        ShowActivated = true,
        Topmost = true
    };

    window.Show();

    IntPtr handle = new WindowInteropHelper(window).Handle;

    Task.Delay((int)timeout.TotalMilliseconds).ContinueWith(
        t => NativeMethods.SendMessage(handle, 0x10 /*WM_CLOSE*/, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero));

    return window;
}

And here is the import for the SendMessage Windows API method:

static class NativeMethods
{
    [DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    public static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, UInt32 Msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);
}
4
  • Window type is for Windows Forms ?
    – Kiquenet
    Nov 20, 2013 at 19:25
  • Why do you need to send a message to the hidden parent window to close it? Can't you just call some "Close" method on it or dispose it otherways? Sep 2, 2015 at 13:31
  • To answer my own question, the OwnedWindows property of that WPF Window seems to show 0 windows and Close doesn't close the messagebox child Sep 2, 2015 at 13:53
  • 2
    Briliant solution. There is some naming overlap in System.Windows and System.Windows.Forms that took me some time to figure out. You will need the following: System, System.Runtime.InteropServices, System.Threading.Tasks, System.Windows, System.Windows.Interop, System.Windows.Media
    – m3tikn0b
    Dec 9, 2015 at 20:31
11

I know this question is 8 year old, however there was and is a better solution for this purpose. It's always been there, and still is: User32.dll!MessageBoxTimeout.

This is an undocumented function used by Microsoft Windows, and it does exactly what you want and even more. It supports different languages as well.

C# Import:

[DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
public static extern int MessageBoxTimeout(IntPtr hWnd, String lpText, String lpCaption, uint uType, Int16 wLanguageId, Int32 dwMilliseconds);

[DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true)]
public static extern IntPtr GetForegroundWindow();

How to use it in C#:

uint uiFlags = /*MB_OK*/ 0x00000000 | /*MB_SETFOREGROUND*/  0x00010000 | /*MB_SYSTEMMODAL*/ 0x00001000 | /*MB_ICONEXCLAMATION*/ 0x00000030;

NativeFunctions.MessageBoxTimeout(NativeFunctions.GetForegroundWindow(), $"Kitty", $"Hello", uiFlags, 0, 5000);

Work smarter, not harder.

1
  • 2
    This solution worked for me immediately and within a single class. I removed the reference to NativeFunctions since it was all kept local. This seems easier than the other answers since I didn't need to download any other software and is dependable. Mar 17, 2023 at 17:26
10

RogerB over at CodeProject has one of the slickest solutions to this answer, and he did that back in '04, and it's still bangin'

Basically, you go here to his project and download the CS file. In case that link ever dies, I've got a backup gist here. Add the CS file to your project, or copy/paste the code somewhere if you'd rather do that.

Then, all you'd have to do is switch

DialogResult result = MessageBox.Show("Text","Title", MessageBoxButtons.CHOICE)

to

DialogResult result = MessageBoxEx.Show("Text","Title", MessageBoxButtons.CHOICE, timer_ms)

And you're good to go.

1
  • 2
    You missed the .Show extension in your examples... Should read: DialogResult result = MessageBoxEx.Show("Text","Title", MessageBoxButtons.CHOICE, timer_ms)
    – Edd
    Dec 7, 2018 at 15:57
3

A message box will be destroyed when its parent form is removed. We can use this to our advantage by creating a dummy form, showing the message box as a child of this form, and then closing the form when we no longer require the message box, after 30 seconds, for example.

This is how I did it:

var owner = new Form { TopMost = true };
Task.Delay(30000).ContinueWith(t => {
owner.Invoke(new Action(()=>
{
      if (!owner.IsDisposed)
      {
          owner.Close();
      }
   }));
});
var dialogRes =  MessageBox.Show(owner, msg, "Info", MessageBoxButtons.YesNo, MessageBoxIcon.Information);
1
  • This answer could be improved by briefly explaining the basic approach to the code before showing it. Mar 11 at 16:34
2

DMitryG's code to "get the return value of the underlying MessageBox" has a bug so the timerResult is never actually correctly returned (MessageBox.Show call returns AFTER OnTimerElapsed completes). My fix is below:

public class TimedMessageBox {
    System.Threading.Timer _timeoutTimer;
    string _caption;
    DialogResult _result;
    DialogResult _timerResult;
    bool timedOut = false;

    TimedMessageBox(string text, string caption, int timeout, MessageBoxButtons buttons = MessageBoxButtons.OK, DialogResult timerResult = DialogResult.None)
    {
        _caption = caption;
        _timeoutTimer = new System.Threading.Timer(OnTimerElapsed,
            null, timeout, System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite);
        _timerResult = timerResult;
        using(_timeoutTimer)
            _result = MessageBox.Show(text, caption, buttons);
        if (timedOut) _result = _timerResult;
    }

    public static DialogResult Show(string text, string caption, int timeout, MessageBoxButtons buttons = MessageBoxButtons.OK, DialogResult timerResult = DialogResult.None) {
        return new TimedMessageBox(text, caption, timeout, buttons, timerResult)._result;
    }

    void OnTimerElapsed(object state) {
        IntPtr mbWnd = FindWindow("#32770", _caption); // lpClassName is #32770 for MessageBox
        if(mbWnd != IntPtr.Zero)
            SendMessage(mbWnd, WM_CLOSE, IntPtr.Zero, IntPtr.Zero);
        _timeoutTimer.Dispose();
        timedOut = true;
    }

    const int WM_CLOSE = 0x0010;
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", SetLastError = true, CharSet = System.Runtime.InteropServices.CharSet.Auto)]
    static extern IntPtr FindWindow(string lpClassName, string lpWindowName);
    [System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImport("user32.dll", CharSet = System.Runtime.InteropServices.CharSet.Auto)]
    static extern IntPtr SendMessage(IntPtr hWnd, UInt32 Msg, IntPtr wParam, IntPtr lParam);
}
1

use EndDialog instead of sending WM_CLOSE:

[DllImport("user32.dll")]
public static extern int EndDialog(IntPtr hDlg, IntPtr nResult);
1
  • This is the way to go if you have a message box with yes / no buttons
    – Bruno
    Jan 31, 2023 at 8:54
1

Vb.net library has a simple solution using interaction class for this:

void MsgPopup(string text, string title, int secs = 3)
{
    dynamic intr = Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.CreateObject("WScript.Shell");
    intr.Popup(text, secs, title);
}

bool MsgPopupYesNo(string text, string title, int secs = 3)
{
    dynamic intr = Microsoft.VisualBasic.Interaction.CreateObject("WScript.Shell");
    int answer = intr.Popup(text, secs, title, (int)Microsoft.VisualBasic.Constants.vbYesNo + (int)Microsoft.VisualBasic.Constants.vbQuestion);
    return (answer == 6);
}
1

Use a timer and start in when the MessageBox appears. If your MessageBox only listens to the OK Button (only 1 possibility) then use the OnTick-Event to emulate an ESC-Press with SendKeys.Send("{ESC}"); and then stop the timer.


There is also a codeproject project available HERE that provides the functionality you ask for.

1
  • 1
    Timer concept is a simple way... but have to ensure the sent keys hit your app if it doesn't have or loses the focus. That would require SetForegroundWindow and the the answer starts to include more code, but see 'AppActivate' below.
    – FastAl
    Jan 25, 2013 at 16:10

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.