3

I want to make a CSS3 gradient that consists of a 1px line.

How can I do this?

I have tried the following code, but the gradient that is produced is too thick:

background-image: linear-gradient(left , rgb(255,255,255) 50%, rgb(209,209,209) 50%, rgb(255,255,255) 51%);

(see here)

How can I make the line smaller, so its only 1px wide? The percentage values seem to control the positioning of the line, but no matter how much I adjust them, I can't get it to 1px wide!

(Essentially, I am using the line to act as a 'faux columns' background [i.e. to visually separate a left and right column. (Although, to keep the jsFiddle simple, I have removed the columns)] I know there are other ways of doing columns, but this method is the best for my situation)

EDIT: Just to clarify, this is for a slightly odd use case, where the width has to be 100% and no psudeo-elements can be used.

2
  • have you tried using a pseudo element, 1px wide absolutely positioned? – Scott Simpson Jan 25 '13 at 14:35
  • @ScottSimpson: Thanks for the reply. My use case is slightly odd, so the width has to be 100% and I cannot use pseudo elements. The gradient seems to be the best solution, if I only I could get it to be 1px wide! – big_smile Jan 25 '13 at 14:56
3
.style {        
    background-image: -o-linear-gradient(left , rgb(255,255,255) 50%, rgb(209,209,209) 50%, rgb(255,255,255) 50.5%);
    background-image: -moz-linear-gradient(left , rgb(255,255,255) 50%, rgb(209,209,209) 50%, rgb(255,255,255) 50.5%);
    background-image: -webkit-linear-gradient(left , rgb(255,255,255) 50%, rgb(209,209,209) 0%, rgb(255,255,255) 50.5%);
    background-image: linear-gradient(left , rgb(255,255,255) 50%, rgb(209,209,209) 50%, rgb(255,255,255) 50.5%);
}

You are not dealing with pixels, you are using percentages. So 1% of your width, which must be 200 is 2px. (I think that is why this works, maybe I'm wrong.) You can use percentages decimals, so .5% == 1px.

2
  • Your link to JS fiddle is broken – Simon Aug 9 '16 at 5:00
  • @Simon I changed my user name since I posted this. Its fixed now. – smulholland2 Aug 10 '16 at 23:28
7
/* Opera Mobile */
background: -o-linear-gradient(left, #d1d1d1 1px, white 1px);
/* Firefox for Android */
background: -moz-linear-gradient(left, #d1d1d1 1px, white 1px);
/* WebKit browsers */
background: -webkit-linear-gradient(left, #d1d1d1 1px, white 1px);
/* new syntax: IE10, Firefox, Opera */
background: linear-gradient(90deg, #d1d1d1 1px, white 1px);
background-position: 100% 0;
background-repeat: repeat-y;
background-size: 50%;

demo

[I used 2px instead of 1px in the demo as 1px was not visible. I only tested in Chrome though.]

You should always put the unprefixed version last. There is no need for -ms-linear-gradient. IE10 now supports the standard syntax with no prefix and IE9 doesn't support gradients at all.

1
  • this is the only answer that worked. the others "dont work" – qodeninja Jun 16 '18 at 21:14
6

If you don't care about IE8 (which you probably don't if you're using gradients) you can use calc().

background-image: linear-gradient(left, transparent 50%, rgb(255,255,255) 50%, rgb(255,255,255) calc(50% + 1px), transparent calc(50% + 1px));

This is will work with any width element, whereas just using percentages will break down on smaller and wider elements.

0

I had use this earlier, change it according to your need. I mean change colors and angle as you want

background-image: liner-gradient(to bottom, white, white 14%,blue 1%,white 15%);

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.