153

Is there a way to cast an object to return value of a method? I tried this way but it gave a compile time exception in "instanceof" part:

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(Object o) {
    if (o instanceof T) {
        return (T) o;
    } else {
        return null;
    }
}

I also tried this one but it gave a runtime exception, ClassCastException:

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(Object o) {
    try {
        T rv = (T)o;
        return rv;
    } catch(java.lang.ClassCastException e) {
        return null;
    }
}

Is there a possible way of doing this easily:

String s = convertInstanceOfObject("string");
System.out.println(s); // should print "string"
Integer i = convertInstanceOfObject(4);
System.out.println(i); // should print "4"
String k = convertInstanceOfObject(345435.34);
System.out.println(k); // should print "null"

EDIT: I wrote a working copy of the correct answer:

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(Object o, Class<T> clazz) {
    try {
        return clazz.cast(o);
    } catch(ClassCastException e) {
        return null;
    }
}

public static void main(String args[]) {
    String s = convertInstanceOfObject("string", String.class);
    System.out.println(s);
    Integer i = convertInstanceOfObject(4, Integer.class);
    System.out.println(i);
    String k = convertInstanceOfObject(345435.34, String.class);
    System.out.println(k);
}
2
  • why the last one should print null? and, why don't you return an Object? Java erasure will anyway translate your generic into an Object, so why don't you write directly public static Object convertInstanceOfObject? Jan 25 '13 at 15:20
  • I can decide the later one later, but I wanted to catch ClassCastException :) The thing I wanted to know is that an object is an instance of another object before casting, where I don't know its actual type.
    – sedran
    Jan 25 '13 at 15:37
233

You have to use a Class instance because of the generic type erasure during compilation.

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(Object o, Class<T> clazz) {
    try {
        return clazz.cast(o);
    } catch(ClassCastException e) {
        return null;
    }
}

The declaration of that method is:

public T cast(Object o)

This can also be used for array types. It would look like this:

final Class<int[]> intArrayType = int[].class;
final Object someObject = new int[]{1,2,3};
final int[] instance = convertInstanceOfObject(someObject, intArrayType);

Note that when someObject is passed to convertToInstanceOfObject it has the compile time type Object.

3
  • 67
    I know it's from the OP, but really { catch(ClassCastException e) { return null; } is unforgiveable
    – artbristol
    Jan 25 '13 at 16:38
  • 1
    @SpaceTrucker, thanks. I'm wondering, would be any way to use .isArray() inside convertInstanceOfObject() in the someObject and extract the class (as the intArrayType) from it by reflection and then call an internal private method passing those? But even doing this, I must to create an empty array and pass it in the public method, right?
    – Cristiano
    Jun 16 '16 at 12:09
  • 4
    It should be mentioned that type erasure actually happens at compilation, not runtime. Aug 26 '16 at 4:36
24

I stumble upon this question and it grabbed my interest. The accepted answer is completely correct, but I thought I do provide my findings at JVM byte code level to explain why the OP encounter the ClassCastException.

I have the code which is pretty much the same as OP's code:

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(Object o) {
    try {
       return (T) o;
    } catch (ClassCastException e) {
        return null;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    String k = convertInstanceOfObject(345435.34);
    System.out.println(k);
}

and the corresponding byte code is:

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(java.lang.Object);
    Code:
       0: aload_0
       1: areturn
       2: astore_1
       3: aconst_null
       4: areturn
    Exception table:
       from    to  target type
           0     1     2   Class java/lang/ClassCastException

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: ldc2_w        #3                  // double 345435.34d
       3: invokestatic  #5                  // Method java/lang/Double.valueOf:(D)Ljava/lang/Double;
       6: invokestatic  #6                  // Method convertInstanceOfObject:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
       9: checkcast     #7                  // class java/lang/String
      12: astore_1
      13: getstatic     #8                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      16: aload_1
      17: invokevirtual #9                  // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      20: return

Notice that checkcast byte code instruction happens in the main method not the convertInstanceOfObject and convertInstanceOfObject method does not have any instruction that can throw ClassCastException. Because the main method does not catch the ClassCastException hence when you execute the main method you will get a ClassCastException and not the expectation of printing null.

Now I modify the code to the accepted answer:

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(Object o, Class<T> clazz) {
        try {
            return clazz.cast(o);
        } catch (ClassCastException e) {
            return null;
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String k = convertInstanceOfObject(345435.34, String.class);
        System.out.println(k);
    }

The corresponding byte code is:

public static <T> T convertInstanceOfObject(java.lang.Object, java.lang.Class<T>);
    Code:
       0: aload_1
       1: aload_0
       2: invokevirtual #2                  // Method java/lang/Class.cast:(Ljava/lang/Object;)Ljava/lang/Object;
       5: areturn
       6: astore_2
       7: aconst_null
       8: areturn
    Exception table:
       from    to  target type
           0     5     6   Class java/lang/ClassCastException

  public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
    Code:
       0: ldc2_w        #4                  // double 345435.34d
       3: invokestatic  #6                  // Method java/lang/Double.valueOf:(D)Ljava/lang/Double;
       6: ldc           #7                  // class java/lang/String
       8: invokestatic  #8                  // Method convertInstanceOfObject:(Ljava/lang/Object;Ljava/lang/Class;)Ljava/lang/Object;
      11: checkcast     #7                  // class java/lang/String
      14: astore_1
      15: getstatic     #9                  // Field java/lang/System.out:Ljava/io/PrintStream;
      18: aload_1
      19: invokevirtual #10                 // Method java/io/PrintStream.println:(Ljava/lang/String;)V
      22: return

Notice that there is an invokevirtual instruction in the convertInstanceOfObject method that calls Class.cast() method which throws ClassCastException which will be catch by the catch(ClassCastException e) bock and return null; hence, "null" is printed to console without any exception.

21

If you do not want to depend on throwing exception (which you probably should not) you can try this:

public static <T> T cast(Object o, Class<T> clazz) {
    return clazz.isInstance(o) ? clazz.cast(o) : null;
}
2
  • 1
    Much better. I hate exception-based program flows. In my case, I wanted to check whether the object in question implements an interface. For that, I used isAssignableFrom.
    – haslo
    Aug 2 '19 at 9:50
  • Why not add a type bound to the generic argument instead? public static <T extends Foo> T cast(....) instead of checking whether it is a Foo
    – Patrick
    Apr 6 at 11:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.