11

I have something like this:

class Bar;

class Foo()
{
 public:
   Foo() : bar(new Bar());
   Bar& GetBar() { return *bar.get(); }
 private:
   std::unique_ptr<Bar> bar;
};

void main()
{
   Foo foo;
   auto bar1 = foo.GetBar();
   auto bar2 = foo.GetBar(); //address of bar2 != address of bar1. why?

   Bar& bar3 = foo.GetBar();
   Bar& bar4 = foo.GetBar(); //address of bar3 == address of bar4.
}

It seems the 'auto' variables are copies as I don't get Bars back with the same memory address. If I explicitly define the variables as Bar references (Bar&) then everything works as I would expect.

I should mention I'm compiling in vs2012. What's going on here?

Thanks.

13

auto works like template argument deduction. bar1 and bar2 have types Bar, so they are independent copies; bar3 and bar4 have type Bar & and are references to the same *foo.bar.

  • but GetBar() returns a Bar& and I would imagine that auto would set the variable to the return type of the function. In any event, I found the explanation here: cprogramming.com/c++11/… in the section headed: Auto, References, Pointers and Const. Kind of weird, that. – Aeluned Jan 25 '13 at 16:56
  • 8
    @Aeluned: You can imagine all you want, but the fact is that auto works like template argument deduction. When you have template <typename T> void f(T); and call f(foo.getBar());, you'll deduce T = Bar... – Kerrek SB Jan 25 '13 at 16:59
  • OK, fair enough. I get it now, thanks. – Aeluned Jan 25 '13 at 17:01
  • 11
    @Aeluned: There are many cases where you would not want that, for example when accessing a field in an object if the accessor returns a constant reference you want to get the value now, not a reference to a potentially changing value. The current specification allows you to select if you want a reference by adding & as in auto& bar3 =... – David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 25 '13 at 17:05
22

auto bar1 = … always declares a copy. auto &&bar1 selects the closest possible reference type, which is what you want.

auto && is the perfect forwarding idiom.

You can also use other compound types with auto, such as auto const & or auto * if you want to be specific.

  • +1, I didn't know auto did reference collapsing as well as template type arguments. – Seth Carnegie Jan 25 '13 at 17:02
  • 1
    @SethCarnegie Yep, a large proportion of all my variables are declared auto &&… it's pretty much my default :) – Potatoswatter Jan 25 '13 at 17:04
1

Code:

X& getter() {
    static X value;
    return value;
}

print("X:");
X x0 = getter();
auto x0a = getter();
x0.printAddress();
x0a.printAddress();

print("X&:");
X& x1 = getter();
auto& x1a = getter();
x1.printAddress();
x1a.printAddress();

print("const X&:");
const X& x2 = getter();
const auto& x2a = getter();
x2.printAddress();
x2a.printAddress();

print("X&&:");
print("Rvalue can't be bound to lvalue");
X&& x3 = getter();
auto&& x3a = getter();
x3.printAddress();
x3a.printAddress();

Result:

X:
0037F807
0037F7FB
X&:
00D595BA
00D595BA
const X&:
00D595BA
00D595BA
X&&:
Rvalue can't be bound to lvalue
00D595BA

Conclusion:

auto means: "replace me with type, unless I am auto&& then find the most suitable form".

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