55

It seems that the set_xticks is not working in log scale:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()
ax1.plot([10, 100, 1000], [1,2,3])
ax1.set_xscale('log')
ax1.set_xticks([20, 200, 500])
plt.show()

is it possible?

60
import matplotlib
from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()
ax1.plot([10, 100, 1000], [1,2,3])
ax1.set_xscale('log')
ax1.set_xticks([20, 200, 500])
ax1.get_xaxis().set_major_formatter(matplotlib.ticker.ScalarFormatter())

or

ax1.get_xaxis().get_major_formatter().labelOnlyBase = False
plt.show()

resulting plot

  • 9
    Hi, Could you add some explanation as well as a plot of what this outcome looks like? – Joel Jan 7 '16 at 1:12
  • the second option will keep the logarithmic notation in the ticks, ie 20 is going to be 10^1.3 – grasshopper Sep 1 '16 at 17:07
  • This is fine if the labels match their numeric value, but what if you want them to be some other strings? – asmeurer Mar 20 '17 at 21:08
  • I am a big fan of matplotlib.org/api/… which lets you wring a function mapping value -> string. Else use matplotlib.org/api/… + matplotlib.org/api/… – tacaswell Mar 20 '17 at 22:47
  • @tacaswell: The exponential notation 3x10^1 etc. still remains! How do I remove it ? – ThePredator Jan 16 '18 at 2:21
13

I'm going to add a few plots and show how to remove the minor ticks:

The OP:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt

fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()
ax1.plot([10, 100, 1000], [1,2,3])
ax1.set_xscale('log')
ax1.set_xticks([20, 300, 500])
plt.show()

enter image description here

To add some specific ticks, as tcaswell pointed out, you can use matplotlib.ticker.ScalarFormatter:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker

fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()
ax1.plot([10, 100, 1000], [1,2,3])
ax1.set_xscale('log')
ax1.set_xticks([20, 300, 500])
ax1.get_xaxis().set_major_formatter(matplotlib.ticker.ScalarFormatter())
plt.show()

enter image description here

To remove the minor ticks, you can use matplotlib.rcParams['xtick.minor.size']:

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker

matplotlib.rcParams['xtick.minor.size'] = 0
matplotlib.rcParams['xtick.minor.width'] = 0

fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()
ax1.plot([10, 100, 1000], [1,2,3])
ax1.set_xscale('log')
ax1.set_xticks([20, 300, 500])
ax1.get_xaxis().set_major_formatter(matplotlib.ticker.ScalarFormatter())

plt.show()

enter image description here

You could use instead ax1.get_xaxis().set_tick_params, it has the same effect (but only modifies the current axis, not all future figures unlike matplotlib.rcParams):

from matplotlib import pyplot as plt
import matplotlib.ticker

fig1, ax1 = plt.subplots()
ax1.plot([10, 100, 1000], [1,2,3])
ax1.set_xscale('log')
ax1.set_xticks([20, 300, 500])
ax1.get_xaxis().set_major_formatter(matplotlib.ticker.ScalarFormatter())

ax1.get_xaxis().set_tick_params(which='minor', size=0)
ax1.get_xaxis().set_tick_params(which='minor', width=0) 

plt.show()

enter image description here

  • The exponential notation 3x10^1 etc. still remains! How do I remove it ? – ThePredator Jan 16 '18 at 2:22
4

set_xticks works, if you look closely it puts major ticks at 20, 200, 500 (the ticks are longer than the others). Compare with the same plot without the call to set_xticks.

The point is that set_xticks set the ticks, not the ticklabels. If you want the labels add

ax1.set_xticklabels(["20", "200", "500"])

before plt.show()

  • 8
    This isn't strictly correct. The labels are generated by formatter, which in the case of the log scale is a LogForamtter which apparently does not play nice with non- 10 ** x values. By using set_xticklabels you are using a indexformatter (which if you note the mouse no gives you a valid x value in the figure). This is a work around, but doesn't address the real problem. – tacaswell Jan 25 '13 at 21:38
  • 5
    Saw this question again and would add that this solution is actively dangerous. If the view limits are changed by any method the ticklabels will not change and they will be incorrect. – tacaswell Apr 8 '14 at 16:25

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