80

Possible Duplicate:
Recursive lambda functions in c++0x

Here is a plain old recursive function:

int fak(int n)
{
    return (n <= 1) ? 1 : n * fak(n - 1);
}

How would I write such a recursive function as a lambda function?

[](int n) { return (n <= 1) ? 1 : n * operator()(n - 1); }
// error: operator() not defined

[](int n) { return (n <= 1) ? 1 : n * (*this)(n - 1); }
// error: this wasn't captured for this lambda function

Is there any expression that denotes the current lambda so it can call itself recursively?

marked as duplicate by Mooing Duck, Luchian Grigore, chris, ildjarn, Praetorian Jan 25 '13 at 23:45

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    possible with huge std::function overhead or with polymorphic lambdas. – ipc Jan 25 '13 at 23:36
  • @MichaelBurr, Great link you have there. – chris Jan 25 '13 at 23:40
  • 2
    Oops - I accidentally deleted my comment. here's the link back: blogs.msdn.com/b/vcblog/archive/2008/11/18/… – Michael Burr Jan 25 '13 at 23:44
  • @MichaelBurr, It's funny. I find the notion that you accidentally deleted your comment laughable, but I can relate to how easy it is to do something like that :p – chris Jan 25 '13 at 23:46
  • I'm just gonna leave this here slideshare.net/adankevich/c11-15621074 29 slide – innochenti Jan 29 '13 at 19:06
109

Yes, they can. You can store it in a variable and reference that variable (although you cannot declare the type of that variable as auto, you would have to use an std::function object instead). For instance:

std::function<int (int)> factorial = [&] (int i) 
{ 
    return (i == 1) ? 1 : i * factorial(i - 1); 
};

Otherwise, no, you cannot refer the this pointer from inside the body of the lambda.

  • 2
    I think factorial needs to be captured by reference, but I'm not 100% positive. – ildjarn Jan 25 '13 at 23:43
  • 27
    Also note that such a function cannot be returned safely. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 25 '13 at 23:50
  • 4
    @R.MartinhoFernandes: Good point, it would capture by reference a local object that is gone out of scope. You could still use a shared_ptr I guess (?), but that would be probably kind of fetish. – Andy Prowl Jan 25 '13 at 23:56
  • 1
    @rikimaru2013 returning it destroys the local variable, and the function has a reference to that local variable. – R. Martinho Fernandes May 12 '16 at 14:45
  • 1
    @rikimaru2013 also, just for completeness, note that the equivalent code using a dedicated struct type instead of a lambda would support that by the use of this. – R. Martinho Fernandes May 12 '16 at 15:43

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.