61

I'm writing a console program in C++ to download a large file. I have known the file size, and I start a work thread to download. I want to show a progress indicator to make it look cooler.

How to display different strings at different times, but at the same position, in cout or printf?

49

You can use a "carriage return" (\r) without a line-feed (\n), and hope your console does the right thing.

  • 27
    + manual flush, otherwise it will not be shown immediately because the output is buffered. – leemes Jan 26 '13 at 18:06
  • And if the user accidentaly hits the enter it breaks down :( Apart from that, it is perhaps the most portable solution, +1. – Ali Jan 26 '13 at 19:00
  • @Ali To avoid that, you would have to disable echoing (see man termios) – leemes Jan 26 '13 at 23:27
  • 1
    @leemes #include <termios.h>, try that on M$ Windows :) Anyway, thanks for the tip, I will probably try that on Linux. – Ali Jan 27 '13 at 8:47
  • 1
    @Ali There might be an equivalent for W1ndOw$, but I don't know it. ;) – leemes Jan 27 '13 at 14:00
96

With a fixed width of your output, use something like the following:

float progress = 0.0;
while (progress < 1.0) {
    int barWidth = 70;

    std::cout << "[";
    int pos = barWidth * progress;
    for (int i = 0; i < barWidth; ++i) {
        if (i < pos) std::cout << "=";
        else if (i == pos) std::cout << ">";
        else std::cout << " ";
    }
    std::cout << "] " << int(progress * 100.0) << " %\r";
    std::cout.flush();

    progress += 0.16; // for demonstration only
}
std::cout << std::endl;

http://ideone.com/Yg8NKj

[>                                                                     ] 0 %
[===========>                                                          ] 15 %
[======================>                                               ] 31 %
[=================================>                                    ] 47 %
[============================================>                         ] 63 %
[========================================================>             ] 80 %
[===================================================================>  ] 96 %

Note that this output is shown one line below each other, but in a terminal emulator (I think also in Windows command line) it will be printed on the same line.

At the very end, don't forget to print a newline before printing more stuff.

If you want to remove the bar at the end, you have to overwrite it with spaces, to print something shorter like for example "Done.".

Also, the same can of course be done using printf in C; adapting the code above should be straight-forward.

  • How would you do it if you're reading from a file? – Mohsin Nov 26 '16 at 22:30
22

For a C solution with an adjustable progress bar width, you can try the following:

#define PBSTR "||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||"
#define PBWIDTH 60

void printProgress (double percentage)
{
    int val = (int) (percentage * 100);
    int lpad = (int) (percentage * PBWIDTH);
    int rpad = PBWIDTH - lpad;
    printf ("\r%3d%% [%.*s%*s]", val, lpad, PBSTR, rpad, "");
    fflush (stdout);
}

It will output something like this:

 75% [||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||||               ]
  • Watch out, there should be no ';' at the end of the first #define! – Robb1 May 6 '17 at 9:01
  • @Robb1 Thankx for pointing that out, it's fixed now. – razzak May 6 '17 at 10:25
  • This is the simplest and best solution I have found so far – horro Nov 23 '17 at 8:03
13

Take a look at boost progress_display

http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/libs/timer/doc/original_timer.html#Class%20progress_display

I think it may do what you need and I believe it is a header only library so nothing to link

9

You can print a carriage return character (\r) to move the output "cursor" back to the beginning of the current line.

For a more sophisticated approach, take a look at something like ncurses (an API for console text-based interfaces).

  • 4
    + manual flush, otherwise it will not be shown immediately because the output is buffered. – leemes Jan 26 '13 at 18:07
  • 3
    + '\b' for moving the cursor one position left. – Alexey Frunze Jan 26 '13 at 18:10
  • 1
    +1 for ncurses. Definitely the way to go if you want to do anything a bit more complex. – Leo Jan 27 '13 at 9:11
3

I know I am a bit late in answering this question, but I made a simple class that does exactly what you want. (keep in mind that I wrote using namespace std; before this.):

class pBar {
public:
    void update(double newProgress) {
        currentProgress += newProgress;
        amountOfFiller = (int)((currentProgress / neededProgress)*(double)pBarLength);
    }
    void print() {
        currUpdateVal %= pBarUpdater.length();
        cout << "\r" //Bring cursor to start of line
            << firstPartOfpBar; //Print out first part of pBar
        for (int a = 0; a < amountOfFiller; a++) { //Print out current progress
            cout << pBarFiller;
        }
        cout << pBarUpdater[currUpdateVal];
        for (int b = 0; b < pBarLength - amountOfFiller; b++) { //Print out spaces
            cout << " ";
        }
        cout << lastPartOfpBar //Print out last part of progress bar
            << " (" << (int)(100*(currentProgress/neededProgress)) << "%)" //This just prints out the percent
            << flush;
        currUpdateVal += 1;
    }
    std::string firstPartOfpBar = "[", //Change these at will (that is why I made them public)
        lastPartOfpBar = "]",
        pBarFiller = "|",
        pBarUpdater = "/-\\|";
private:
    int amountOfFiller,
        pBarLength = 50, //I would recommend NOT changing this
        currUpdateVal = 0; //Do not change
    double currentProgress = 0, //Do not change
        neededProgress = 100; //I would recommend NOT changing this
};

An example on how to use:

int main() {
    //Setup:
    pBar bar;
    //Main loop:
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++) { //This can be any loop, but I just made this as an example
        //Update pBar:
        bar.update(1); //How much new progress was added (only needed when new progress was added)
        //Print pBar:
        bar.print(); //This should be called more frequently than it is in this demo (you'll have to see what looks best for your program)
        sleep(1);
    }
    cout << endl;
    return 0;
}

Note: I made all of the classes' strings public so the bar's appearance can be easily changed.

3

Another way could be showing the "Dots" or any character you want .The below code will print progress indicator [sort of loading...]as dots every after 1 sec.

PS : I am using sleep here. Think twice if performance is concern.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int count = 0;
    cout << "Will load in 10 Sec " << endl << "Loading ";
    for(count;count < 10; ++count){
        cout << ". " ;
        fflush(stdout);
        sleep(1);
    }
    cout << endl << "Done" <<endl;
    return 0;
}
0

Here is a simple one I made:

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>

using namespace std;

int barl = 20;

int main() {
   system("color 0e");  
   cout << "[";     
   for (int i = 0; i < barl; i++) {         
      Sleep(100);       
      cout << ":";  
   }
   cout << "]";
}

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